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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 07/13/11

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

LUMBERJACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS FROM HAYWARD, WISCONSIN!





   With a rich history in the forestry industry that spans more than 60 years, leading forestry equipment manufacturer John Deere will be a featured sponsor of this year's competition.
    John Deere is proud to be a Title Sponsor of the Lumberjack World Championships," said Nate Clark, Forestry Marketing Manager for John Deere Construction and Forestry. "The Lumberjack World Championships provides all of us at John Deere with a rewarding opportunity to feature and celebrate the hard work and dedication found in the logging community and epitomized by the competition's athletes."
   In the 52 years since the inaugural event, tens of thousands of spectators have come to the small town of Hayward, Wisconsin from all over the globe to watch the world's finest compete in the "Granddaddy" of all timber sports competitions: Lumberjack World Championships®. It is three days of challenge, determination and pure strength for both men and women competing in events that began in the forests of America.
The thunder of chainsaws, the quick feet of log rollers, the brute strength of the sawyers and choppers, plus the amazing agility and speed of the pole climbers, will not allow your heart to stop pounding throughout this amazing world championship event.







   The Lumberjack World Championships® is recognized as the premier timber sporting event in the nation where lumberjacks and lumberjills from around the world including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Czech Republic come to compete for the gold.
   Fifty-two years ago, Hayward businessman Tony Wise picked up the phone late one evening and began assembling competitors like Dave Geer for an event called the Lumberjack World Championships®.
   Early in its history, the Lumberjack World Championships® were featured in LIFE Magazine, leading to coverage by ABC's Wide World of Sports in 1965. Since that time, numerous national publications and television coverage by ESPN and OLN have covered the event.







   Lumberjack World Championships® was first held at Historyland, a historical theme park in Hayward commemorating the heritage of the region's fur trade, Indian culture and logging industry. Historyland no longer stands, but Lumberjack Bowl, were all the events are held, still does. Lumberjack Bowl was once a giant holding pond for the North Wisconsin Lumber Company, and today it still showcases over 100 competitors each July in events ranging from sawing and chopping to speed climbing, log rolling and boom running.
   The Lumberjack World Championships® began in 1960 as a way to acknowledge the rich history of the logging industry across the United States. Work day skills that were perfected in the forests of the nation became a past-time and soon grew into an exciting and growing sporting event. From the Lumberjack World Championships®, now trademarked in Hayward, Wisconsin, to the ESPN's Great Outdoor Games, lumberjack sports has increased in popularity with loyal fans and competitors from across the globe.
   Hayward, Wisconsin, rich in both history and natural beauty, holds its lumberjack championships in what was once a giant holding pond for logs of Weyerhaeuser's North Wisconsin Lumber Company. The people of Hayward embrace this rich history each summer with hundreds of volunteers and community support making this a world class event for thousands of visitors.







   The Lumberjack World Championships® showcases over 21 unique competitions and world records in events ranging from men's and women's logrolling, to chopping and the exciting pole climb. Over 100 plus competitors vie for more than $50,000 in prize money, making this one of the largest purses for lumberjack competition in the world.




   The Lumberjack World Championships® is a leader in the recognition and support of the women's events in the timber sports arena. The women's competitions have proven to be one of the most popular crowd-pleasers with some of the most incredible female athletes competing in a variety of events.
   The pure strength and skill of the various chopping and sawing events, the agility and grace as well as the endurance, of logrolling and the exhilaration of 90-foot tree climbing makes this an exciting family events each summer for over 12,000 spectators.

Competitions

Women's Single Buck

   Sixteen-inch white pine logs are used, and all cross-cut sawing events are against time. A starting cut arc is allowed in the competition. Timing begins when the signal "Go" is called, and ends when the log is completely severed. The world record is currently held by Nancy Zalewski since 2006 with a time of 11.61 seconds.

Women's Underhand Chop

   The contest is against time. Using a single bit pinned axe, competitors chop through a horizontal aspen log, 11 inches in diameter and 15-28 inches long. Nancy Zalewski set a new world record in 2009 with a time of 29.24 seconds








Underhand Block Chop

   Using a five-pound single-bit axe, competitors chop through a horizontal aspen log 12 inches in diameter and 28 inches long. Timing begins on the signal "Go" and ends when the log is severed. A new world record was set in 2006 by Jason Wynyard with a time of 15.94. New in 2007, competitors moved from the Underhand Chop to the Standing Block Chop for one continuous timed event known as the Endurance Event.

Standing Block Chop

   Using a five-pound single-bit axe, competitors chop through a vertical standing aspen log 12 inches in diameter and 28 inches long. Timing begins on the "GO" signal and ends when the log is severed. This event was combined with the Men"s Underhand Chop as the Endurance or Combination event in 2007. Competitors moved from the Underhand Chop to the Standing Block Chop for one continuous timed event. The World Record for the Standing Block Chop is held by Jason Wynyard set in 1998 with a time of: 18.33.

Springboard Chop

   This event combines the skills of the chopper and the high climber. Out in the forest this technique enables a working lumberjack to reach softer wood above the tough and knotty base of a tree marked for cutting. Contestants climb a height of nine feet using two springboard placements and chop through a 12-inch diameter aspen log mounted on the top of the spar pole. Dave Bolstad set a new world record of: 41.15 in 2003 besting his previous world record time of: 41.63 in 2001.








Men's Logrolling

   In competition opponents step onto a floating log, cuff it to start the roll, spin it rapidly in the water with their feet, stop or snub it suddenly by digging into the log with special caulked birling shoes and a reverse motion to maneuver their adversaries off balance and into the water, a feat called 'wetting'. Dislodging an opponent constitutes a fall. The cardinal rule of logrolling is 'never take your eyes off your opponent's feet'. The referee starts each match. Competing birlers step off a dock onto a floating log, grasping pike poles held by attendants for balance. As they push off from the dock, the referee instructs the birlers to steady the log. When he is certain both birlers have equal control, he says, 'Throw your poles'. The match is on and continues to a fall or to expiration of the time limit set for each log. When the time limit is reached, the same match continues onto the next smaller log. In the semi-finals and the finals, the contest is decided by the best three out of five falls. Men start on 15-inch logs.

Women's Logrolling

   In competition opponents step onto a floating log, cuff it to start the roll, spin it rapidly in the water with their feet, stop or snub it suddenly by digging into the log with special caulked birling shoes and a reverse motion to maneuver their adversaries off balance and into the water, a feat called 'wetting'. Dislodging an opponent constitutes a fall. The cardinal rule of logrolling is 'never take your eyes off your opponent's feet'. The referee starts each match. Competing birlers step off a dock onto a floating log, grasping pike poles held by attendants for balance. As they push off from the dock, the referee instructs the birlers to steady the log. When he is certain both birlers have equal control, he says, 'Throw your poles'. The match is on and continues to a fall or to expiration of the time limit set for each log. When the time limit is reached, the same match continues onto the next smaller log. In the semi-finals and the finals, the contest is decided by the best three out of five falls. Women start on 14-inch logs. In 2003 Tina Bosworth set a new world record of 10 wins.






Single Buck

   A single sawyer uses a one-man bucking saw to cut through a 20-inch diameter white pine log. Dion Lane set a new world record in 2006 with a time of 10.78 seconds.

Double Buck

   Two sawyers working as a team use a two-man bucking saw to cut through a 20-inch diameter white pine log. Double buck team consists of two men. A starting cut arc is allowed. Timing begins for both competitions when the signal to 'GO' is called, and ends when the log is completely severed. Jason Wynyard and Dion Lane hold the world record with a time of 4.77 seconds set in 2005.

Jack and Jill Sawing

   Jack and Jill bucking contests consist of a man and woman and are against time. Starting cuts of no more than one-half inch deep, in order to set the teeth of the saw, are allowed. Logs must be cut completely through. Timing starts on the signal 'GO' and ends when the block is severed. The wood is 20' white pine. The world record for this event was set in 2005 by Jason and Karmyn Wynyard with a time of 6.17 seconds.







Hot Saw

   A single sawyer using a single-cylinder, single-motor power saw makes three vertical cuts- down, up and down'through a 20-inch diameter white pine log. This one-man contest is strictly against time. Chainsaws may be warmed up prior to the contest, but must be turned off before the contest begins. Neither self starting nor impulse-type push button starters nor twin motors are allowed. A starter gives the countdown and on the signal 'GO', competitors start their saws and make the three cuts. The contest ends when the third slice is severed. All cuts must be complete. Dave Bolstad of New Zealand holds the world record with a time of 5s.55 seconds set in 2007.

90 ft. Speed Climb

   Contestant scales an 90 foot tall cedar spar pole and returns to the ground against time. Contestants compete on twin spar poles. Contestant must climb within the front 240 degrees of the sparring pole, as marked. Timing begins on the signal 'GO' and ends when the contestant touches the ground after ringing one of the two bells on top of the spar pole. At the starting signal, contestants must have one foot on the ground and the other foot below the orange line as marked on the sparring pole. On the descent climbers are required to touch inside each section. Contestants use spurred climbers and steel-core climbing ropes to scale the spar poles. In this climb Brian Bartow of Oregon holds the world record with a time of 19.87 set in 2006.

60 ft. Speed Climb

   Competitor scales a 60 foot tall cedar spar pole and returns to the ground. Contestants perform on twin spar poles and they must climb within 240 degrees of the sparring pole, as marked. Event is strictly against time and begins when the signal 'GO' is given and ends when the contestant touches the ground after climbing to the 60 foot mark. At the starting signal, contestants must have one foot on the ground and the other foot below the orange line as marked on the sparring pole. The contestant must touch the pole every 15 feet on the descent. The two climbers use spurred climbers and steel-core climbing ropes to scale the spar poles. Only traditional spurs are allowed. Brian Bartow of Grants Pass, Oregon holds the world record of 12.33 seconds in this event.




One of the awards



Men's Boom Run

   Starting on the log-rolling dock, two competitors run head to head on adjacent booms. Each competitor must step off the logrolling dock, running across a chain of logrolling logs to the chopping dock, circling a specified competition station and cross the pond on the boom logs back to the logrolling dock. The competitor must step onto the logrolling dock and touch the starting point. This is a timed event and is timed to the tenths of a second. Anyone leaving before the word 'GO' will be accessed a 10 second penalty.

Women's Boom Run

   Starting on the log-rolling dock, two competitors run head to head on adjacent booms. Each competitor must step off the logrolling dock, running across a chain of logrolling logs to the chopping dock, circling a specified competition station and cross the pond on the boom logs back to the logrolling dock. The competitor must step onto the logrolling dock and touch the starting point. This is a timed event and is timed to the tenths of a second. Anyone leaving before the word 'GO' will be accessed a 10 second penalty.

Relay Event

   In this timed event there are 2 teams competing. Each team consist of a 60 foot climber, 2 boom runners (1 male- 1 female), a hot sawyer, a women's single buck sawyer and a standing block chopper. First a climber must climb and descend the 60 foot pole, when their feet touch the pad it is the signal for the male boom runner stationed on the chopping dock to run the logs to the logrolling dock; when he touches the dock it is then the female boom runner's turn to run the logs over to the chopping dock, once touching there the hot saws then cut through a 20 inch log and when the log drops the women commence the single buck, with the standing block chop the anchor event in this relay. Whichever team finishes first with the best time is the winner of the event. This event is the combination of the best of all the lumberjack skills ' power, strength and sheer determination.






Amateur Logrolling

   Once there were only a few schools teaching logrolling in the land, Hayward and La Crosse, Wisconsin being two of them. Nowadays there are more and more springing up from Hudson to the East Coast with universities and high schools even adding the sport to their water sport curriculum. Children from age 4 and up are eligible to learn the sport that combines balance, agility and mental toughness and enter into competitions. All children enrolled in amateur categories from 6 & under, up to the Semi-Pros, roll in tennis shoes. At the Semi-Pro category they must roll in spikes and those that win move up into the pro ranks the following year. The Hayward Log Rolling School is proud to be the training ground of many world champion log rollers, including such multi- year greats as Brian Duffy, Fred and Judy Scheer, Bonnie Pendleton and Tina Bosworth and JR Salzman.

All-Around Lady Jill

   The All-Around Lady Jill Champion is awarded each year to the Lumber Jill who scores the most points. The key to the All Around title is endurance and the ability to compete in as many events as possible. The top contestants in every event receive points each day of the competition, making it important to make it through early qualifying rounds in as many events as possible. Points are given each day for the top six places in each event, with a first place being awarded 6 points, second 5 points and so on. Logrollers will receive triple points for their final place4ment. This is because the final standings are the only opportunity for logrollers to earn points. Women's All-Around events are the Underhand Chop, Single Buck, Jack and Jill, Logrolling and the Boom Run. Last year's winner is Nancy Zalewski of Wisconsin, who has now taken home the crown 3 times.






Tony Wise All-Around

   The Tony Wise All Around Champion, named after the founder of the Lumberjack World Championships', is awarded each year to the Lumberjack who scores the most points. The key to the All-Around title is endurance and the ability to compete in as many events as possible. The top contestants in every event receive points each day of competition, making it important to make it through early qualifying rounds in as many events as possible. Points are given each day for the top six places in each event, with a first place being awarded 6 points, second 5 points and so on. There are two exceptions to this. Due to the nature of the Springboard Chop and Logrolling, the all-around points for these two events will be scored differently. For the Springboard, the sixth fastest competitor's form Friday's and Saturday's heats will receive double the points. This is because Springboard competitors only get one opportunity to earn all around points. 5th and 6th placements will be awarded triple points for their final placement. This is because the final standings are the only opportunity for logrollers to earn points. The Tony Wise All-Around Events are: Underhand Chop, Standing Chop, Springboard Chop, Double Buck, Single Buck, Hot Saw, Jack & Jill, Logrolling, Boom Run, 60 foot Climb and 90 Foot Climb. Jason Wynyard, who was the 2007 winner, has taken home the crown for 9.








Master's Underhand Chop

   Using a 5 single-bit axe, competitors over the age of 50 chop through a vertical standing aspen log 12 inches in diameter and 28 inches long. Timing begins on the signal “GO” and ends when the log is severed.
years in a row.

Master's Double Buck

   Two sawyers over the age of 50 working as a team, use a two-man bucking saw to cut through a 20-inch diameter white pine log. A starting cut is allowed. Timing begins for both competitors when the signal “GO” is called and ends when the log is completely severed.




GEORGE A. ROMERO-FATHER OF THE ZOMBIE MOVIE CULT!




   It's important to first note that there is a difference between what a zombie originally was meant to represent and what history has actually made it out to be. The term "zombie" comes from the Haitian culture and folklore (called a "zombi") in which a Bokor, or voodoo priest, used a white powder coup padre and black magic to resurrect the deceased of someone who had annoyed his or her family or community. The 1932 film White Zombie is one of the earliest productions to utilize this but it wouldn't be the last. There were many early productions that focused on the traditional image of the zombie such as The Voodoo Man (1944), I Walk With A Zombie (1943), Revolt of the Zombies (1936), Plague of Zombies (1965), and I Eat Your Skin (1961), to name a few, but it wasn't until writers John Russo and George A. Romero conjured up their 1968 production of Night of the Living Dead that the face of the zombie and horror genre would forever be changed.






   Night of the Living Dead (NOTLD) marked Russo and Romero's first feature production after having toiled in the commercial and shorts arena. This would also be Romero's debut feature as director. It's interesting to note that in numerous early interviews that because Romero's "undead" were not those of traditional zombies that he referred to them as "ghouls" a much more accurate term considering that the film wanted to give a more supernatural reason for the reason behind the undead uprising. The word "ghoul" has many meanings but the most accurate in terms of how Romero uses it would be that a ghoul is a someone who feasts on flesh or a cannibal, which is exactly how Romeo depicts his ghouls. They are themselves undead that hunger for the flesh of the living.






    NOTLD became an instant success having survived from word of mouth and underground and drive-in cinemas across the country. It was a realistically depicted apocalypse of an all too human kind. Romero's film inadvertently re-invented what the term "zombie" meant and in turn redefined how audiences saw horror films. At the time of its release NOTLD was one of very few films in cinemas that wasn't mimicking the success of the British Hammer studio films especially in terms of their own zombie films Plague of Zombies and I Eat Your Skin, which were famous for their gothic settings and almost dreamlike allure. NOTLD played everything straight as if its events could happen in the real world. NOTLD was released in a time when audiences were growing tired of the Hammer studio model and wanted something different.







   The success of NOTLD was something that Romero could not live up to in his early career. He would then go on to direct several non-genre titles including There's Always Vanilla (1971), Hungry Wives (aka Season of the Witch, 1972), and The Crazies (1973), before he tackled the vampire genre with Martin (1977). None of these productions were a significant boost to his career and eventually he decided to return to the film that made him a household name with the NOTLD sequel Dawn of the Dead (1978). With ten years inbetween the two films Romero had set to craft a film far removed from that of NOTLD.








   Dawn of the Dead (DOTD) was a film not associated with his previous partner Russo (who would go off to write and produce the NOTLD spin-off Return of the Living Dead in 1985 with writer/director Dan O'Bannon). Instead, Romero teamed up with Italian horror master Dario (Suspiria, Deep Red) Argento in a grand adventure of gore-ific excess that would further entrench Romero into the sub-genre. DOTD was an international success that inspired imitators all over the world. In Italy and many other European countries the film was simply titled Zombi, for which has had four sequels of its own (although none of them have anything to do with Romero's original film).









Romero was now deemed the father of the zombie film (although he still never calls them zombies in his films). Romero's trilogy would be complete with Day of the Dead (1985) but by this time audiences were growing weary of his version of the zombie and latched onto Russo and O'Bannon's 1985 release Return of the Living Dead. Although credited to both Russo and O'Bannon it is clear that Return is definitely a product of O'Bannon's choosing. O'Bannon had previously written the comic-sci-fi spoof Dark Star (1974), for which he collaborated with John (Halloween, The Thing) Carpenter, Alien (1979), and Dead & Buried (1981). He decided to pay homage to Romero's classic but also steer clear away from Romero's example. O'Bannon's zombies (and he does call them that) can talk and have a conscious and can think and react. They are neither slow moving nor eat the living flash; they simply claim "brains" as sustenance and cannot be destroyed by shooting them in the head. These are a whole different type of zombie for a new generation.







   Romero would not abandon the universe that made him famous. He would explore the nature of the zombie in several other films including Creepshow (1982) and Creepshow 2 (1987), which he did not direct but did write the original screenplay for which features his the story " The Hitchhiker", and Two Evil Eyes (1990), with his segment "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemare." These films allowed him to stray from his tried and true formula with mixed results. In 1990 Romero decided to try his hand at his "ghouls" once again by writing the screenplay to the remake of his own NOTLD. This 1990 version would be directed by frequent collaborator and make up effects artist Tom Savini and would not go over well with audiences. Its opening numbers were a mere $2.9 million with an estimated total domestic gross of just under $6 million (www.boxofficemojo.com). Audiences and critics were indifferent with the film especially in a year fueled with such heavy psychological films as Misery, Flatliners, Jacob's Ladder, and The Exorcist III. The only other genre offerings of the year were Arachnophobia, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Darkman, and Predator 2. NOTLD 1990 did not fit anywhere within that year's offerings.








   After Two Evil Eyes, Romero would toil away on the studio debacle The Dark Half (1993) before disappearing into obscurity. Although he had given birth to the modern day "zombie" film time had passed him by and audiences had forgotten about him.
Although Romero was nowhere to be found, the zombie genre did not disappear. It was kept alive with films such as Re-Animator (1985), Dead Heat (1988), The Evil Dead (1983), The Evil Dead II (1987), Zombie High (1987), Dead Alive (1993), My Boyfriend's Back (1995), Pet Sematary (1989), Resident Evil (2002), and 28 Days Later (2005), to name a few. These films changed the face of the zombie from zombies that talked to zombies that craved brains (among other things) to fast moving zombies, among other things. These were zombies for a more savvy age (that had no problem calling them zombies) influenced by the success of Resident Evil, 28 Days Later, and the Dawn of the Dead remake (2004). How fitting it is that just as the remake of        Romero's DOTD hits screens that he decides to make a comeback to the series that made his career with the forth part in his zombie apocalypse Land of the Dead (2005).






Not only battling the popularity of the modern day (as in 2004 version) zombies inhabiting Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004), Land of the Dead (LOTD) also was released to a market crowed with other zombie films Shaun of the Dead and Undead, among others, that paid homage to Romero's films while also offering something different to audiences. LOTD's worldwide gross was over $46 million, triple its $15 million production budget. Although Romero clashed with Universal Studios who produced the film, the experience re-awakened the filmmaker that had been buried underneath years of compromise and disappointment due to Hollywood studio interference with his previous films.








   With LOTD Romero did not change the way he looked at his "ghouls" but what he did do and which very few other films have ever tried to do is to evolve his "ghouls." This was something he experimented with in Day of the Dead where Bub was being conditioned by the doctors to find a way to domesticate them. In LOTD, this evolution is further explored through Big Daddy who leads the undead horde into the city for vengeance. A new undead being was born and Romero finally decided that it was time to go back to the beginning.







   In 2006, Romero started production on a new series of films that would happen parallel to events depicted in his original 1968 version of NOTLD. This film would be Diary of the Dead (2007) and its events would be the beginning of the apocalypse through the eyes of filmmakers who are capturing everything as it happens. This allowed Romero to have total control over his production (as there was no distributor in place during filming) without the influence of a Hollywood studio, the way he used to work when he first became a filmmaker.








   Diary is a new evolution in the way Romero sees his "zombies" and hopefully this new film will again change the face of the zombie genre like his original 1968 Night of the Living Dead did.