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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 08/17/11

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

TOP TEN UNUSUAL FACTS ABOUT CHRISTMAS!

   Christmas is all about gifts, snow and Santa Claus. However, there are certain facts about the holiday that you don’t know and probably wouldn’t even want to!
1. The Myrrh Tree

   Everybody is aware of the fact that Jesus received myrrh as a gift from the magi which is basically tree sap that is dried out. What people don’t know is that the first myrrh tree came into being because Myrrha was indulging in sexual activities with her father and once her father realized it, he tried to kill her. However, she escaped and was turned into a tree.

2. The Defecating Caganer

   Every nativity set consist of Mary, Joseph and their baby Jesus. The family is often surrounded by animals, shepherds and other figures. In places like Italy and Spain, one figure will be that of the caganer who will be placed away from the manger and will be seen defecating.

3. Saint Nicholas

   Saint Nicholas, also known as Santa Claus, is known to have brought three children back to life. These children were staying with a butcher who murdered and pickled them. He then tried to serve the meat as pork but good old Santa came by and resuscitated the poor children. There are several paintings of Saint Nicolas wherein some children will be seen standing around in tubs- now you know why!

 



 
4. Christmas Used to be Banned

   During 1659 to 1681, the holiday was not celebrated in Massachusetts and was banned. This is because it was believed that 25th December was not a day to be celebrated as God had not mentioned it in the Bible.


 

5. Knecht Rupercht and the Christmas Cat

   Knecht Rupercht is among the many companions of Saint Nicholas. He is known to punish those who have been bad by taking them to a forest in a sack and eating them. Another legend says that if you do not buy new clothes on Christmas, the Christmas Cat will come and eat you alive.

 


6. The Caga tió

   The Caga tió is a tree which is native to the Catalonia region. It has a hollow log which is fed by the local families after which it is covered with a warm blanket. On Christmas day, these families come together and sing songs while they beat up the poor tree. The tree then throws up figs, candy and nuts.


 


7. Wassailing

   Wassailing is the term given to those who knock on doors and sing traditional Christmas songs. The hosts then give them some cookies and warm milk. However, many people don’t know that the original wassailers were aggressive and would forcibly enter homes and compel the hosts to give them food. If you find this difficult to believe, just go through the lyrics of We Wish You a Merry Christmas-
”Now bring us some figgy pudding, We won’t go until we get some”

 

8. Mari Lwyd

   This is basically the skull of a horse covered with ribbons and bells. It sits atop a stick and is carried around under a sheet. It has green glass instead of eye socket and its jaw has the ability to ‘snap’ at those who pass by.

 



 
9. Leo V

   In 820, Leo (the Byzantine Emperor) was at the alter on Christmas Day, praying when some conspirators headed by Michael the Amorian tried to assassinate him. The poor emperor gave in and Michael was made the emperor.

 



 
10. The Coventry Carol

    The Coventry Carol originated in the 15th century and is quite popular even today. The song was first sung in a play called “The Pageant of the Shearman and Tailors”. The song talks about King Herod who asked all male infants to be killed.

WORLD SAUNA CHAMPIONSHIPS FROM HEINOLA, FINLAND!




   The World Sauna Championships were an annual endurance contest held in Heinola, Finland, from 1999 to 2010. They originated from unofficial sauna-sitting competitions that resulted in a ban from a swimming hall in Heinola. The Championships were first held in 1999 and grew to feature contestants from over 20 countries. Sauna bathing at extreme conditions is a severe health risk: all competitors competed at their own risk, and had to sign a form agreeing not to take legal action against the organizers. Notably, the Finnish Sauna Society strongly opposed the event.
After the death of one finalist and near-death of another during the 2010 championship, the organizers announced that they would not hold another.  This followed an announcement by prosecutors in March that the organizing committee would not be charged for negligence, as their investigation revealed that the contestant who died may have used painkillers and ointments that were forbidden by the organizers.





   The championships began with preliminary rounds and ended in the finals, where the best six men and women would see who could sit in the sauna the longest. The starting temperature in the men's competition was 110 °C (230 °F). Half a liter of water was poured on the stove every 30 seconds. The winner was the last person to stay in the sauna and walk out without outside help. The host country usually dominated the event, as only one foreign competitor ever made it into the finals in the men's competition. The first non-Finnish winner in the women's competition was Natallia Tryfanava from Belarus in 2003.





Rules

  • The starting temperature is 110 degrees Celsius. Half a liter of water will be poured on the stove every 30 seconds.
  • Use of alcohol is prohibited prior to and during the competition.
  • Competitors must wash themselves beforehand, and remove any creams and lotions.
  • Competitor must sit erect, their buttocks and thighs on the bench.
  • Ordinary swimsuits must be used. Pant legs in men's swimsuits may be up to 20 centimeters long, and women's shoulder straps may be up to 5 centimeters wide.
  • Hair that reaches the shoulders must be tied into a ponytail.
  • Touching the skin and brushing is prohibited.
  • Competitors must not disturb each other.





  • At the request of the judges, competitors must show that they are in their senses with a thumbs up.
  • Competitors must be able to leave the sauna unaided to qualify.
  • A breach of the rules results in a warning. Another one results in disqualification.
  • The last person leaving the sauna unaided is the winner.

 TV Broadcasting and Other Media

   In 2004, Nippon Television filmed a documentary about the World Sauna Championships. The program had an audience of about 40 million in Japan. The network did a similar documentary again in 2007, when they filmed a whole week in Heinola and in Lahti. This time Kazumi Morohoshi (former singer in a popular boy band Hikaru Genji) was with them and also took part in the competition. He ended in the first round, with a time 5:41. Also in 2007, American sportswriter Rick Reilly (who described it as "quite possibly the world's dumbest sport") was also in Heinola. His time in the first round was 3:10 and was eliminated from the second round.






 2010 accident

   On 7 August 2010, Russian finalist and former third-place finisher Vladimir Ladyzhensky and Finnish five-time champion Timo Kaukonen passed out after six minutes in the sauna, both suffering from terrible burns and trauma. According to a spectator who asked not to be identified, Kaukonen was able to leave the sauna with assistance, but Ladyzhensky had to be dragged out, and almost immediately went into cramps and convulsions.   They were both rushed to the hospital but Ladyzhensky died en route. Kaukonen was reported to suffer from extreme burn injuries, and his condition was described as critical, but stable.   Just a few minutes before the finals, Kaukonen told the Norwegian newspaper Verdens Gang that the saunas used for the 2010 championship were a lot more extreme than the saunas used for previous competitions.   
   As Kaukonen and Ladyzhensky were disqualified for not leaving the sauna unaided, Ilkka Pöyhiä became the winner.






   The organizer, Ossi Arvela, said that there will probably never be another sauna competition. Two days later the City of Heinola noted that there are no official decisions about the future of the event, and the decisions will be made after the incident has been examined.  Arvela later reported that Finnish police had decided not to file charges in connection with the tragedy, but were continuing to investigate.  Kaukonen woke up from a coma two months after the event. His respiratory system was scorched, 70% of his skin was burnt and eventually his kidneys failed as well. In late October, Kaukonen was reported to be recovering quickly. He did not blame the organizers for his injuries.





   Ladyzhensky's autopsy concluded that he had died of third-degree burns. His death was aided by his use of strong painkillers and local anesthetic grease on his skin. Kaukonen was competing according to the rules.
   On April 20, 2011, the City of Heinola announced that they would no longer organize the event, noting that " If the city was to organize the World Sauna Championships in the future, the original playful and joyous characteristics of the event should be reintroduced. No ways to achieve this have been found."

Champions

YearMenWomen
1999Finland Ahti MerivirtaFinland Katri Kämäräinen
2000Finland Leo PusaFinland Katri Kämäräinen
2001Finland Leo PusaFinland Annikki Peltonen
2002Finland Leo PusaFinland Annikki Peltonen
2003Finland Timo KaukonenBelarus Natallia Tryfanava
2004Finland Leo PusaBelarus Natallia Tryfanava
2005Finland Timo KaukonenBelarus Natallia Tryfanava
2006Finland Timo KaukonenFinland Leila Kulin
2007Finland Timo KaukonenFinland Leila Kulin
2008Finland Bjarne HermanssonFinland Leila Kulin
2009Finland Timo KaukonenRussia Tatyana Arkhipenko
2010Finland Ilkka Pöyhiä[14]Germany Michaela Butz