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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 10/05/11

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

TOP 10 BIZZARRE HALLOWEEN COSTUMES!!

   Halloween is the time when most of the bizarre costumes come out of the closet and make their way on to the roads much to the embarrassment of most folks. Halloween’s the time for and frolic and what better way to enjoy all the macabre than by dressing up in some of the most hilarious costumes. The usual Halloween costumes are great but if you want to cause uproar the best thing to do is to wear something whacky.
Take a look at the top 10 most bizarre Halloween Costumes. Costumes got crazier this year and more creative which made people stand up and take notice. Things that we use in our day-to-day lives were brought out very hilariously. If taken in the right spirit, these costumes could give us a good laugh.



Elvis-with-a-camel-toe
1. Elvis with a camel toe

   A huge guy having nothing left to the imagination sports the costume and if you look hard enough you can see what I mean. With everything flabby, this is such a let down to Elvis Presley fans worldwide. Look away girls!



Creepy-Bert-&-Ernie-as-gay-

2. Creepy Bert & Ernie as gay Muppets

   They look straight out of a Batman and Joker Movie. Only this time Batman is missing and Two Jokers are present. A rubber duckling in hand does not help make this a presentable picture either.


Bat-Child

3. Bat Child

   All grown up with a caption that he was found in a cave; totally taken from the cover of World Weekly News. Not a pleasant sight but definitely better than the rest of costumes that have made us queasy so far.



Poo-Poo-Platter
4. Poo Poo Platter

   This costume is something that’s really funky as you show up like some large brownies on a plate. This too coupled with some chopsticks. Seems quite interesting, but unusual. You will certainly find this one to be quite different from what you usually see around you.



Child-Playboy-Bunny
5. Child Playboy Bunny

   If you are someone who loves bunny rabbits, then you’ll surely love the Child Playboy Bunny. This bunny costume is a nice laugh and you would be left wondering with comical emotions when you look yourself up in the mirror with this act on.




Human-Toilet
6. Human Toilet

   If you wanted to have something that’s really weird, this is the one to opt – the Human Toilet. You will be wondering what on earth this costume has – it has a toilet sticking out of it, which is really kind of silly and you will surely find it quite a laugh to wear.


Human-MacDonald

7. Human MacDonald

   Dressing up as a human hamburger is quite a fun thing to do. You look like this big hamburger and no one can look quite match up to the funny shape that you assume when you wear this costume.


Milk-Carton


8. Milk Carton

   This kind of costume does look bizarre, but then if you are someone into trying out whacky and weird things then this is the kind of costume that you would want to try out.


Baby-Woopie-Cushion


9. Baby Woopie Cushion

   If round shapes is what is so appealing to you, you would be thinking of the Baby Woopie Cushion as something that you would really like.


White-Trash

 
10. White Trash

   Wearing a White Trash Can costume certainly seems out of the ordinary. No one would have thought of using a trash can as a costume like this one.

*HALLOWEEN AROUND THE WORLD, PART II!!




Japan-  In Japan O-Bon festival celebrates the memory of the dead relatives. Food and water is placed in front of photos of the dead. Bonfires and lanterns light the spirits' path back to earth.
   O-Bon celebrated by some people from July 13-15 and others from August 13-15, O-Bon gets its name from the Sanskrit word for "to hang upside down." It refers to a legend about a Buddhist monk who, deep in meditation, was able to "see" his long-dead mother hanging upside down in the Buddhist equivalent of hell. This was her punishment for having eaten meat during her lifetime - a Buddhist taboo - and refusing to repent of it. The monk was holy enough to go to hell and buy his mother's passage to Nirvana with some of his own excess goodness.




   On the first day of O-Bon, people decorate their loved ones' graves with fruit, cakes, and lanterns. On the second day, spirit altars or as they are referred to tamadana, are assembled at home: Atop a woven rush mat stand the ancestors' memorial plaques, tempting vegetarian dishes, and cucumbers carved to represent horses on which the spirits are invited to ride. On the third day, whole communities gather for the bon-odori, a hypnotic, slow dance that moves in concentric circles or multiple lines. Hundreds of people often dance together. As evening falls, tiny paper lanterns are set adrift on river or sea: these omiyage gently light the spirits way back to the "other shore".
   Buddhist Japanese remember their dead at the time in autumn of equal days and nights. The festival that is celebrated is called Higan. It is a time when people visit the graves of friends and family who are dead. They tidy up the area and think about the dead people.




Mexico-  In Mexico they have picnic lunches on the graves of their relatives. As this is a day of remembrance, happiness and celebration.
   They bake bread and make candy in the shape of skull and crossbones, a casket, or a skeleton.
   The children run through the streets with lanterns and ask for coins.
People light bonfires, set off firecrackers, and hang lanterns on trees to guide the souls of the dead home.
   In Mexico All Saints' Day is devoted to Los angelitos - that is, all the dead children. This is a prelude to November 2's Dia de los Muertos, Day of the Dead, a national holiday on which all the grown-up ghosts will be arriving in full force. The littler ghosts get a head start. To help them find their way back to the homes where they once lived, parents and still-living family members often shoot off firecrackers. In some parts of the country on this night they strew a path of flower petals from the graveyard to the front porch.
   Mexico's Dia de los Muertos Day of the Dead calls for happy all day picnics beside the graves of dead relatives. At home, people assemble little altars called ofrendas, stocked with the departed loved ones favorite foods and drinks, their photos, and other memories, as well as candles and pungent marigolds, a flower long associated with death.
   The Mexican custom of Erecting Day of the Dead altars has caught on north of the border, where the altars serve as the focus of ancestor rituals and memorials.
In Mexico October 27 is the Feast of the Holy Souls or Fiesta de las Santas Animas, families begin the fiesta by cleaning their relatives' graves and adorning them with pine needles and flowers. The families assemble a temporary altar near the gravesite, stocking the altars with candles and all kinds of foods such as meat, beans, chilies, salt, tortillas, fruit and sometimes alcohol. Each person in the family then takes turns in talking to the departed spirit, offering it the food and assuring it that it is loved. The ceremonies go on for several days, as every family has more than one grave to attend to.






United States-  In North America people believed that it was bad luck for a black cat to cross your path. It was believed that it was unlucky for a black cat to come into their homes or travel on their ships.
    In the United States trick-or-treaters are welcomed by placing lighted pumpkins known as jack-o'-lanterns in their windows.
   The North American tradition of trick or treat comes from the original idea that you must be kind to dead ancestors or they will play a trick on you.
   Neopagans of North America honor their ancestors on October 31. It was once believed that on this night any souls who had not yet passed into the paradise of the summer lands might return to wander the streets and visit their old homes once more.
   Neopagans celebrate the festival today as a turning point between the old and the new year, as well, the date of October 31 as the gateway between the worlds. Many neopagans believe that, on the eve of Samhain, the veil that separates each world that of the living and that of the dead is at its thinnest and that on this night, there is a better chance of being successful in communicating with their ancestors.




Philippines-  In the Philippines people light candles in the memory of their dead relatives.




Poland-  In Poland doors and windows are left open to welcome the spirits or the visiting souls.
   In Poland November 1 has become a public holiday.
   On All Saints' Day Catholics attend church services in honor of the saints, the martyrs and those who have died for the Catholic faith. People may also visit their family’s graves to beautify them with wreaths and small lanterns. Sometimes a mass is said at the gravesite and the grave sprinkled with holy water.
   On November 2 or All Souls' Day, Catholics attend a special Requiem masses, where they remember those who may be close to them that have died. Prayers for the dead are said and votive candles are lit to honor their memory.





Portugal-  In Portugal they have feasts of wine and chestnuts at the cemetery.
   In Portugal they bake special sugar cakes with cinnamon and herb flavoring.




Rome-  Parentalia the Roman holiday dedicated to honoring dead family began precisely at the sixth hour on the thirteenth day of February and lasted a full nine days thereafter. These dies parentales or in English parental days, were not a spooky time for the average Roman citizen. Rather, these were days of obligation and feasting, quiet and respectful, introspective, like a wake. During the Parentalia, all temples were closed, weddings were forbidden, and governmental magistrates uncharacteristically appeared in public devoid of the insignia of their office. People visited their parents' and other relatives' graves, bringing offerings such as milk, wine, honey, oil, and spring water. Some brought sacrificial blood from the bodies of black animals. They decked the graves with roses and violets. "Dining with the dead" at the grave site, the celebrant would offer the traditional greeting and farewell of the holiday: "Salve, sancte parens", "Hail, holy ancestor."
   The Vestal virgins, the priestesses who tended the goddess Vesta's shrine in the Forum, performed rites of their own at the Parentalia. The senior Vestal paid a ceremonial visit to the group's "parental" tomb - that of the early Vestal, Tarpeia.
On May 9 is the Lemuria a festival held to remove the more hungry ghosts or Lemures.





 
   The Lemuria is a festival held for homeowners to rid their homes of resident lemures. A celebrant would walk through the house barefoot at midnight walking from room to room with one hand upheld in the fig gesture, which is the thumb held between the second and third fingers. The celebrant’s mouth would be filled with dried black beans, which he would spit out one by one as he walked. The beans were used as ghost bait. As he walked he would spit one out and say the chant nine times: "With these I redeem myself and mine." The idea was that the lemures would be following him, eating the beans that had been spat out by the celebrant. While the celebrant was walking around with the ghosts following him people were not to look back during the ritual. Once the celebrant had come full circle, he would wash his hands thoroughly, then he would beat brass pans together, making as much noise as possible so as to bid the lemures good-bye.






   A festival held called Feralia is much like the Day of the Dead ceremony. The name feralia comes the verb ferre meaning to carry, or to ferry.
The Roman families would go to the ancestral graveyard, ferrying offerings. The reasons was that they believed the ghosts were hovering around the graves, so they take food to extinguish the pyres.
   Once the ancestors were honored and fed, comes the ceremony Caristia from the word Cara meaning dear. This was a holiday to re-affirm, a day of affectionate family reunions.
   All fighting was forbidden, old feuds would be forgotten, and sibling rivalries would have to be set aside.




Russia-  In Russia the blue cat is said to bring good luck. Blue cats such as Russian Blue, British Blue and Burmese.






Scotland-  In Scotland the children cut scary faces into hollowed-out turnips, large rutabagas, or potatoes and inside of them they place a candle inside.
   In Scotland they continued to practice their deep-rooted, ancient pagan rites well after the arrival of Christianity in the middle of the sixth century. The Church fathers had become concerned that the popularity of non-Christian festivals was growing at the expense of Christian holy days.
   During the ruling of the Popes, everything was the same as England and Ireland.
   In Scotland Soul Cakes were known as Dirge Loaves and were flat, round buns of oat flour.
   Scottish superstitions ran deeper and darker than most. In memory of the fact that Scotland had been the only country to burn to death its supposed witches, children in Aberdeenshire would run around their villages, banging on doors and shouting. This practice continued until the early twentieth century.






   Effigies of witches were burned on the Halloween bonfire. A dummy of an old woman called the shandy Dan was wheeled in a cart to the center of a large gathering of villagers and then tossed onto the fire with much celebration.
   Children once also enjoyed throwing cabbages and turnips at doors at Hallowe'en time.
   They also smashed bottles near windows.




Spain-  In Spain the black cat is considered to be bad luck, especially if you let it cross your path, come into your home or even onto your ship. In Spain also a special pastry known as the Bones of the Holy is eaten on this day.
   In Spain November 1 has become a public holiday. On All Saints' Day Catholics attend church services in honor of the saints, the martyrs and those who have died for the Catholic faith. People may also visit their family’s graves to beautify them with wreaths and small lanterns. Sometimes a mass is said at the gravesite and the grave sprinkled with holy water.
   On November 2 or All Souls' Day, Catholics attend a special Requiem masses, where they remember those who may be close to them that have died. Prayers for the dead are said and votive candles are lit to honor their memory.





   March 13-19 in Spain is Las Fallas which is in honor of St. Joseph whose feast day is on March 19. There are fireworks, bullfights, music, costumed revelers and parades. Giant models of people or papier-mâché effigies called ninots are stuffed with fireworks and burned.
   The bonfires and burning of effigies is done to "blazing away" the last vestiges of winter and welcoming the glow of the summer Sun.

DIY FANGED PUMPKINS TO MAKE!






 
   Grouped together on the mantel, Drac-o'-lantern and pals create a Transylvanian scene. Run-of-the-mill pushpins turn into devilish red eyes. I found these on www.marthastewart.com .  Enjoy making these from real pumpkins or if you want them year after year, use the small fake ones.

Tools and Materials

Thumbtack or pin
Small white pumpkin (For a big bite, choose a small pumpkin so the plastic vampire teeth seem huge)
Miniature saw
Plastic vampire teeth
Small red map tacks
  1. Print mouth template. Lay template on pumpkin, and poke thumbtack through, all along outline, to transfer design. Cut out with saw; remove excess flesh.
  2. Wedge teeth into hole.
  3. For eyes, pin map tacks onto pumpkin.
  4. Fangs, partycity.com. Map pins, 1/8 inch, in Red; latitudesmapstore.net.

HALLOWEEN AROUND THE WORLD, PART I!!




Austria-   In Austria, some people leave bread, water, and a lighted lamp on the table when they go to bed. The reason why it is done is that it was believed by doing so it would welcome the dead souls back to earth for this particular night was a night of strong cosmic energies. In Austria Catholics celebrate the entire period between October 30 and November 8 as Seleenwoche or Alls Souls' Week.
    On All Saints' Day Catholics attend church services in honor of the saints, the martyrs and those who have died for the Catholic faith. People may also visit their family’s graves to beautify them with wreaths and small lanterns. Sometimes a mass is said at the gravesite and the grave sprinkled with holy water.
   On November 2 or All Souls' Day, Catholics attend a special Requiem masses, where they remember those who may be close to them that have died. Prayers for the dead are said and votive candles are lit to honor their memory.






Belgium-   In Belgium people believed that it was bad luck for a black cat to cross your path. It was believed that it was unlucky for a black cat also to come into their homes or travel on their ships.
   In Belgium people light candles in memory of their dead relatives.






England-  In Great Britain everyone wants to welcome the friendly spirits so special soul-cakes for them. When children in costumes called upon their neighbors' homes on Hallowe'en they would be given soul-cakes too!
   In some parts of Britain Hallowe'en in the past was known as Mischief Night. It was a night for mischief making. People would take the doors off their hinges on this night. The doors were also often thrown into ponds, or taken a long way away.
   In England it is said that elves road on the backs of the villagers' cats. The cats had fun but the villagers did not and would lock their cats up so that the elves could not catch them.
   Children were told not to sit in the circles of yellow and white flowers were fairies have danced as they may be stolen by the fairies. It was also bad to sit under the hawthorn tree because the fairies loved to dance on them and if they saw them their tempers would be prickled.





   In England the black cat was considered to be good luck were as a white cat was considered to be bad luck.
   In England children make "punkies " out of large beets. They cut out a design of their choice into the beet. Then they carry them through the streets and sing the Punkie Night Song. They knock on doors and ask for money.
   In some parts of England turnip Lanterns are place on gateposts to protect homes from the spirits.
   In England Halloween was nicknamed, Nutcracker Night or Snap Apple Night. Families would sit before a great fire in the hearth, roasting nuts and eating apples. They told stories and played holiday games. It was an evening of great fun and merriment.
   In England they continued to practice their deep-rooted, ancient pagan rites well after the arrival of Christianity in the middle of the sixth century. The Church fathers had become concerned that the popularity of non-Christian festivals was growing at the expense of Christian holy days.
   Pope Gregory I,  in 601 issued a decree to his missionaries about the faith and customs of the people whom he wanted to convert to Christianity. Gregory knew that it would be impossible to eradicate the beliefs of the natives totally and so suggested to his priests that they "convert" them whenever possible.





 
   If the native people worshipped at a well, or sacred grove, Gregory informed his missionaries to enshrine them to Christ and let the worship continue.
   Gregory's successor Pope Boniface IV in 609,  declared May 13 All Saints' Day. Unfortunately, while pagans were happy to add All Saints' Day to their calendar, they were unwilling to give up their existing festival of the dead and continued to celebrate Samhain.
   Intent on eliminating the ongoing power of the pagan beliefs, Pope Gregory III followed in the footsteps of the earlier Christian leaders and intentionally united the Christian All Saints' Day to the festival of Samhain. He then moved All Saints' Day to November 1, which became more commonly known as All Hallows. Because Samhain had traditionally fallen the night before All Hallows, it eventually became known as All Hallows' Even' or Hallowe'en.
   Previous church leaders to Gregory III discouraged the Samhain tradition of wearing frightening costumes, but Gregory decided instead to allow people to dress up in honor of the saints. Other traditions, such as begging for food and kindling, were made legal by the Church, providing that any food that was given to the beggars would be given to the poor, rather than to appease the spirits.





   The Church also added a second day to the festival, this fell on November 2 and was called All Souls' Day and was dedicated to the souls of those who are still left in purgatory. These souls had to endure the punishment of purgatory for their sins. It was believed that the lighting of candles and the saying of prayers for the dead would shorten the time they were to suffer in purgatory before they would rise to heaven.
   The Tradition of begging for food soon was replaced with souling or Soul Caking. The idea was for children to go from door to door asking for money to give to the poor and a soul cake to have for themselves. Every cake they would receive, the children would say a prayer for the souls of the dead.
   Soul cakes were called many different names throughout England such as Saumas or soul mass cakes which were dark fruitcakes, another cake was covered in caraway seeds and made into a bun.
   In the North of England the tradition of lighting bonfires was central to the Halloween celebration. Superstition was still strong as a result of the aftermath of the witch-hunts; witches were believed to take to the air to harass everyone at Halloween.
   Halloween was called Tan Day for the township of Lancashire. Tan day was so named as it was the Celtic tein, or fire and pitchforks full of burning hay were flung into the air to scare the witches. Another reason was the heat and the smoke of the bonfires would also drive away any airborne witches.







Canada-  In Canada people welcome trick-or-treators by placing pumpkins called jack-o'-lanterns in their windows.
   Also in Canada it is bad luck for a black cat to cross your path, enter your home, or even enter your ship.
   In Canada people give trick-or-treaters sweets to make sure they are not played a trick on.
   Children make Jack-o'-lanterns for hallowe'en.
   Dressing up as witches, ghosts and beasts for trick-or-treating is done also.






Ireland-  Thousands of years ago there was a tribe of farmers called the Celts. They knew that the sun helped make their crops grow, so when autumn came the sun began to fade and they believed that the sun would be winter's prisoner for six months.
   They were worried that the sun would not return so to make sure it did they held a festival on October 31. During which, they asked the sun to return safely in the summer. All the cooking fires were put out and a huge bonfire was lit on the hillside. Here they prayed the sun would shine brightly after winter was over.
   The next morning they would return to the hillside take a piece of the burning wood from the remains of the bonfire and light new fires so as to bring good luck. Feasts were held over the new fires and people would dress up in costumes made out of animal skins. It was believed these costumes would protect people from bad luck.






   This is how Hallowe'en is said to have begun and is still celebrated today.
   Cats were considered by the Celts too be spirits and that cats could predict the future.
   In Ireland the black cat was considered to be bad luck and if it crosses your path while walking or crosses the threshold of your home or ship it was considered bad luck.
   In Ireland children would cut scary faces into hollowed-out turnips, large rutabagas, or potatoes. Then place and candle inside them.
   Children once enjoyed throwing cabbages and turnips at doors at Hallowe'en time. Smashing bottles near windows was also done in fun.
   The Celts referred to Halloween as The Samhain Festival. It was during this time that you would lead your livestock home from summer pastures to the winter shelters. Samhain Eve was a time when the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead grew thinner, and ghosts ventured toward the warmth if people's homes and hearths. On the Eve the Celts built bonfires in memory of their departed ancestors and left food and drink on their tables overnight for eating by the ghosts.
   The tenth-century abbot of Cliny Odile changed Samhain's name to All Saints' Day. October 31 became All Hallows' Eve or Hallowes' Even, and eventually would become Halloween. Halloween is now for the children, whose practice of trick-or-treating has its roots in the English custom of "soul-caking". From medieval times onward poor people would beg door-to-door for spiced cakes that the householders would award as payment for prayers the beggars promised to say for the householders' ancestors. This song was referred to as the soul-cakers song






   In Ireland they continued to practice their deep-rooted, ancient pagan rites well after the arrival of Christianity in the middle of the sixth century. The Church fathers had become concerned that the popularity of non-Christian festivals was growing at the expense of Christian holy days.
   Pope Gregory I, in 601 issued a decree to his missionaries about the faith and customs of the people whom he wanted to convert to Christianity. Gregory knew that it would be impossible to eradicate the beliefs of the natives totally and so suggested to his priests that they "convert" them whenever possible.
   If the native people worshipped at a well, or sacred grove, Gregory informed his missionaries to enshrine them to Christ and let the worship continue.
   Gregory's successor Pope Boniface IV in 609, declared May 13 All Saints' Day. Unfortunately, while pagans were happy to add All Saints' Day to their calendar, they were unwilling to give up their existing festival of the dead and continued to celebrate Samhain.
   Intent on eliminating the ongoing power of the pagan beliefs, Pope Gregory III followed in the footsteps of the earlier Christian leaders and intentionally united the Christian All Saints' Day to the festival of Samhain. He then moved All Saints' Day to November 1, which became more commonly known as All Hallows. Because Samhain had traditionally fallen the night before All Hallows, it eventually became known as All Hallows' Even' or Hallowe'en.
   Previous church leaders to Gregory III discouraged the Samhain tradition of wearing frightening costumes, but Gregory decided instead to allow people to dress up in honor of the saints. Other traditions, such as begging for food and kindling, were made legal by the Church, providing that any food that was given to the beggars would be given to the poor, rather than to appease the spirits.



  


   The Church also added a second day to the festival, this fell on November 2 and was called All Souls' Day and was dedicated to the souls of those who are still left in purgatory. These souls had to endure the punishment of purgatory for their sins. It was believed that the lighting of candles and the saying of prayers for the dead would shorten the time they were to suffer in purgatory before they would rise to heaven.





China-  In China the Hallowe'en festival is known as Teng Chieh in which food and water are placed in front of photographs of relatives of people. Bonfires and lanterns are lit to light the spirits path back to earth.
   Another Hallowe'en festival is called The Feast of the Hungry Ghosts. In China the souls of the dead, particularly during the seventh lunar month, wander the earth in search of affection. They are known as the hungry ghosts because of their hunger for recognition and care.
   The number of souls is usually increased by those who died unnatural deaths, and who may not have been given a proper burial or burial place which their families could





visit in order to pay them respect. Other such Hungry ghosts that are abroad during this month are the spirits of people whose families had either died out or who showed no concern for their welfare in the beyond. Bereft of comfort, they feel abandoned and, lacking ancestral worship, may turn malignant and become powerful threats to the living.
   The purpose of the Festival of the Hungry Ghosts, is dedicated to the earthbound spirits. Its purpose is to make them feel welcome and to satisfy their spiritual hunger. This will placate any possible anger they might have and gain their gratitude.
   In the sacred ritual of the day, the spirits are offered joss sticks, food and gifts. The gifts, made of paper, represent objects with which they were familiar while on earth and are intended to make them feel at home. Paper money is burnt on their behalf, to pay for their expenses in the netherworld. Fires are lit to light the way for the hungry ghosts and a gesture of welcome.






Czechoslovakia-  In Czechoslovakia chairs are placed by the fireside. There is a chair for each family member and one for each family member’s spirit.






Germany-  In Germany people put their knives away. This is done as they do not want to risk hurting the returning spirits.
   In the regions of Bavaria and Austria in Southern Germany, Catholics celebrate the entire period between October 30 and November 8 as Seleenwoche or Alls Souls' Week.
   On All Saints' Day Catholics attend church services in honor of the saints, the martyrs and those who have died for the Catholic faith. People may also visit their family’s graves to beautify them with wreaths and small lanterns. Sometimes a mass is said at the gravesite and the grave sprinkled with holy water.
   On November 2 or All Souls' Day, Catholics attend a special Requiem masses, where they remember those who may be close to them that have died. Prayers for the dead are said and votive candles are lit to honor their memory.




Hong Kong-  In Hong Kong there is a festival similar to Hallowe'en. During the Hungry Ghosts Festival or Yue Lan, ghosts and spirits roam the world for 24 hours. Some people burn pictures of fruit or money. This was believed to reach the spirit world and comfort the ghosts on this day.





Italy-  In Italy they make cakes in the shape of beans. These cakes are called Beans of the Dead.
   In Southern Italy families prepare a special feast for the souls of the departed on All Souls' Day. The families would set the table with a bountiful meal. Then they would all go to church to pray for the souls of the deceased. They stayed there all day, leaving their home open so that the spirits could enter and enjoy the feast.
When the family came home to find that their offerings hadn't been consumed it meant that the spirits disapproved of their home and would work evil against them during the coming year.
   In Italy November 1 has become a public holiday.
   On All Saints' Day Catholics attend church services in honor of the saints, the martyrs and those who have died for the Catholic faith. People may also visit their family’s graves to beautify them with wreaths and small lanterns. Sometimes a mass is said at the gravesite and the grave sprinkled with holy water.
   On November 2 or All Souls' Day, Catholics attend a special Requiem masses, where they remember those who may be close to them that have died. Prayers for the dead are said and votive candles are lit to honor their memory.