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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 11/02/11

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

ALL SOULS DAY!

  


 All Souls' Day commemorates the faithful departed. In Western Christianity, this day is observed principally in the Catholic Church, although some churches of the Anglican Communion and the Old Catholic Churches also celebrate it. The Eastern Orthodox churches observe several All Souls' Days during the year. The Roman Catholic celebration is associated with the doctrine that the souls of the faithful who at death have not been cleansed from the temporal punishment due to venial sins and from attachment to mortal sins cannot immediately attain the beatific vision in heaven, and that they may be helped to do so by prayer and by the sacrifice of the Mass (see Purgatory).   In other words, when they died, they had not yet attained full sanctification and moral perfection, a requirement for entrance into Heaven. This sanctification is carried out posthumously in Purgatory.
The official name of the celebration in the Roman Rite liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church is "The Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed".
   Another popular name in English is Feast of All Souls. In some other languages the celebration, not necessarily on the same date, is known as Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos or de los Difuntos in Spanish-speaking countries; halottak napja in Hungary; Yom el Maouta in Lebanon, Israel and Syria).




   The Western celebration of All Souls' Day is on 2 November and follows All Saints' Day, which commemorates the departed who have attained the beatific vision. If 2 November falls on a Sunday, the Mass is of All Souls, but the Office is that of the Sunday. However, Morning and Evening Prayer (Lauds and Vespers) for the Dead, in which the people participate, may be said. In pre-1969 calendars, which some still follow, and in the Anglican Communion, All Souls Day is instead transferred, whenever 2 November falls on a Sunday, to the next day, 3 November, as in 2008.
The Eastern Orthodox Church dedicates several days throughout the year to the dead, mostly on Saturdays, because of Jesus' resting in the tomb on Saturday.

The Western Celebration

   Historically, the Western tradition identifies the general custom of praying for the dead dating as far back as 2 Maccabees 12:42-46. The custom of setting apart a special day for intercession for certain of the faithful on November 2 was first established by St. Odilo of Cluny (d. 1048) at his abbey of Cluny in 998.  From Cluny the custom spread to the other houses of the Cluniac order, which became the largest and most extensive network of monasteries in Europe. The celebration was soon adopted in several dioceses in France, and spread throughout the Western Church. It was accepted in Rome only in the fourteenth century. While 2 November remained the liturgical celebration, in time the entire month of November became associated in the Western Catholic tradition with prayer for the departed; lists of names of those to be remembered being placed in the proximity of the altar on which the sacrifice of the mass is offered.





   The legend connected with its foundation is given by Peter Damiani in his Life of St Odilo: a pilgrim returning from the Holy Land was cast by a storm on a desolate island. A hermit living there told him that amid the rocks was a chasm communicating with purgatory, from which perpetually rose the groans of tortured souls. The hermit also claimed he had heard the demons complaining of the efficacy of the prayers of the faithful, and especially the monks of Cluny, in rescuing their victims. Upon returning home, the pilgrim hastened to inform the abbot of Cluny, who then set 2 November as a day of intercession on the part of his community for all the souls in Purgatory.


Eastern-Rite Catholics and the Eastern Orthodox Churches

   Among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Christians, there are several All Souls' Days during the year. Most of these fall on Saturday, since Jesus lay in the Tomb on Holy Saturday. These are referred to as Soul Saturdays. They occur on the following occasions:
  • The Saturday of Meatfare Week (the second Saturday before Great Lent)—the day before the Sunday of the Last Judgement
  • The second Saturday of Great Lent
  • The third Saturday of Great Lent
  • The fourth Saturday of Great Lent
  • Radonitsa (Monday or Tuesday after Thomas Sunday)
  • The Saturday before Pentecost
  • Demetrius Saturday (the Saturday before the feast of Saint Demetrius of Thessaloniki—26 October) (In the Bulgarian Orthodox Church there is a commemoration of the dead on the Saturday before the feast of Saint Michael the Archangel—8 November, instead of the Demetrius Soul Saturday)
(In the Serbian Orthodox Church there is also a commemoration of the dead on the Saturday closest to the Conception of St. John the Baptist—23 September)
Saturdays throughout the year are devoted to general prayer for the departed, unless some greater feast or saint's commemoration occurs.




Protestantism and Roman Catholic Church


   At the Reformation the celebration of All Souls' Day was fused with All Saints' Day in the Anglican Church, though it was renewed individually in certain churches in connection with the Catholic Revival of the 19th century. The observance was restored with the publication of the 1980 Alternative Service Book, and it features in Common Worship as a Lesser Festival called "Commemoration of the Faithful Departed (All Souls' Day)".
   Among continental Protestants its tradition has been more tenaciously maintained. Even Luther's influence was not sufficient to abolish its celebration in Saxony during his lifetime; and, though its ecclesiastical sanction soon lapsed even in the Lutheran Church, its memory survives strongly in popular custom. Just as it is the custom of French people, of all ranks and creeds, to decorate the graves of their dead on the jour des morts, so German  and Polish people stream to the graveyards once a year with offerings of flowers and special grave lights (see the picture), and among Czech people the custom of visiting and tidying graves of relatives on the day is quite common even among atheists. In North America, however, most Protestant acknowledgment of the holiday is generally secular, celebrated in the form of Halloween festivities.




 Folklore

   The origins of All Souls' Day in European folklore and folk belief are related to customs of ancestor veneration practised worldwide, such as the Chinese Ghost Festival or the Mexican Day of the Dead. The Roman custom was that of the Lemuria.
   In Tirol, cakes are left for them on the table and the room kept warm for their comfort.  In Brittany, people flock to the cemeteries at nightfall to kneel, bareheaded, at the graves of their loved ones, and to anoint the hollow of the tombstone with holy water or to pour libations of milk on it. At bedtime, the supper is left on the table for the souls.
In Bolivia, many people believe that the dead eat the food that is left out for them. In Brazil people attend a mass or visit the cemetery taking flowers to decorate their relatives' grave, but no food is involved.

HOPE YOU SAVED SOME OF THOSE PUMPKIN SEEDS SO WE CAN DO SOME ROASTING!!

   This comes to up from www.mykitchenaddiction.com.  Good luck and happy roasting!


   Last week I shared my simple method for making homemade pumpkin puree. So today it only seemed natural that I’d share a quick idea for what to do with all of the pumpkin seeds that you inevitably have left over when you make puree!
   Almost every set of how-to instructions for pumpkins, whether it’s carving or cooking, will tell you not to discard the pumpkin seeds. Some may indicate that they are tasty when they are roasted, but many just stop at telling you not to be wasteful, not really helping you much with what to do with them now that you have set them aside for later.
   I remember my mom roasting pumpkin seeds as a snack when my brother and I would carve pumpkins as kids (a few years ago now). So, I have always known that the seeds could be roasted, but I have to admit that I have thrown them away more often than not. The few times I did attempt to roast them, they would come out tasting like burnt popcorn, and then I would throw them out after roasting them.
   Over the past few years, though, I’ve had my share of pumpkins (and made lots of puree), so I did a little bit of research on how to correclty roast pumpkin seeds. It seemed like the responsible thing to do, right? Though I may not be the pumpkin seeds expert, I thought I’d share what works for me!





Sweet and Salty Roasted Pumpkin Seeds
(Ingredients for seeds from 1 large pumpkin)
  • 1 - 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
   Remove as much of the pulp from the seeds as you can (but don’t be crazy about it!). Then, give the seeds a quick rinse in a collandar. While you can buy hulled raw seeds at a bulk store, I never bother to attempt to take the outer seeds off of mine. They are perfectly edible as-is, and I just don’t have the time and energy for that!
Spread the seeds out on a baking sheet that has been lined with aluminum foil. They will be pretty slimy at this point, so let them sit out and dry for a while (I usually let them go overnight).
   Once the seeds have dried, preheat the oven to 300°F.
   While the oven heats, drizzle the seeds with some canola oil (just enough to coat). Then, sprinkle the seeds with the brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Use your fingers to mix everything up and make sure the seeds are evenly covered. Spread them out in a single layer on the baking sheet and pop into the oven.
   Roast the seeds for about 40 – 45 minutes, stirring once or twice so that they don’t stick to the pan. They are ready to come out of the oven when they are golden brown and toasty.
   Let them cool on the pan, stirring occasionally. Once they are cool to the touch, transfer them to a serving dish (or eat directly off of the pan!) and start munching.




THE NOT SO ANCIENT HISTORY OF 10 OF THANKSGIVINGS FAVORITE DISHES!!

   On Thanksgiving, more than any other day of the year, Americans sit down and eat the same meal as their neighbors and countrymen. It’s tradition, after all! But we know our history: most of the Thanksgiving dishes we enjoy today weren’t at the original Pilgrims’ feast in 1621, or at least not in the way we enjoy them. How did we come up with the modern menu on so many tables?


1. Candied Sweet Potatoes


   Sweet potatoes are native to the Americas and their consumption goes back about 5,000 years, so it is no wonder they are associated with the American holiday, even though the Pilgrims didn’t have them in Massachusetts. But when did we start adding sugar to make them even sweeter than they are? The earliest recipe found is from 1889, in which sweet potatoes are made into candy.
The candied sweet potato is a Philadelphia confectionery. It is nothing but sweet potatoes carefully boiled and quartered, then candied in boiling syrup, but it is said to be dainty and tender and of a delicious flavor”.
   By 1895, recipes for sweetened sweet potatoes as a dinner side dish were showing up. Some call these recipes candied yams, although actual yams are a different plant altogether. “Yams” is an American nickname for the softer varieties of sweet potato.


2. Cranberry Sauce


   Cranberries were probably a part of the original Thanksgiving feast. The Native Americans used them for food, medicine, and even dye. Most importantly, cranberries were used as a preservative because they contain benzoic acid, so they added the fruit to meats and grains to extend their shelf life. General Ulysses S. Grant ordered cranberry sauce to be served to his troops in 1864, probably to prevent scurvy during the winter. It was first put into cans in 1912 by a company that eventually came to be known as Ocean Spray, a term that originally was used only for their canned cranberry sauce. .

3. Brown and Serve Rolls


   Although not confined to Thanksgiving, “brown and serve rolls” are sold by the ton by various manufacturers for the holiday. They originated in 1949 when baker Joe Gregor of Avon Park, Florida tried to please his customers who wanted their rolls warm for dinner. He worked on the problem for months until he accidentally produced a batch of half-baked rolls. He left the “ruined” rolls in the oven while he responded to a fire alarm (Gregor was a volunteer fireman) and when he returned, he reheated the rolls and realized what he had produced. Gregor sold half-baked rolls to his customers to take home and finish baking before dinner. General Mills bought the process for $25,000, allowing Gregor to retire from baking. Recipes are available so that you can make your own rolls ahead of time and brown them just before dinner.


4. Apple Cider


   It is not known when the first actual apple cider was produced, but the invading Romans discovered it in use in the village of Kent when they invaded England in 55BCE. Cider spread through Europe during the Middle Ages. English settlers brought apple seeds to America, where the trees thrived. Other drinks, especially beer, became more popular, but cider is traditionally consumed in the fall to celebrate the apple harvest. That is how cider, especially spiced cider, came to be associated with Thanksgiving and Christmas.

5. Deviled Eggs



   The concept of deviled eggs goes back to at least Ancient Rome, when boiled eggs were topped with spicy sauces. Removing the yolks from boiled eggs, adding spices, and then returning them was common in medieval times. The word “deviled” was first used in print to describe a highly spiced recipe in 1786, and came to be used for any food that was “hot” like the devil’s domain.

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6. Roast Turkey


   There are only a couple of accounts of the Pilgrim’s feast written by participants, and at least one never even mentioned turkeys. The most famous remembrance was written twenty years after the fact by governor William Bradford and was confiscated by the British during the Revolutionary War. It was not recovered until 1854. Meanwhile, turkeys were roasted during the winter months by any Americans who had access to the birds. When the Bradford document became available, roast turkey became associated with the Thanksgiving meal. After all, the birds are much easier to raise on farms than the deer, swans, partridges, and seal meat that were also on the Pilgrims’ menu.



7. Stuffing or Dressing


   Stuffing animals for roasting goes back to ancient times, with old recipes surviving from the Roman Empire. After removing the organs, the big hole left behind is an opportunity to add seasoning from the inside, and filling the cavity helps to even the cooking over a fire. In modern times, the Thanksgiving turkey is the only large animal that most people ever roast whole in their homes, so the custom of stuffing is linked to Thanksgiving turkey. However, it is often served without ever actually being inside the turkey. Modern instant stuffing is even served with no turkey at all! Stovetop Stuffing was invented in 1971 by Ruth Siems for General Foods (now Kraft Foods). The convenience of instant stuffing was an immediate hit when it was launched in 1972. The company sells around 60 million boxes every Thanksgiving.



8. Green Bean Casserole



   The green bean casserole that many people serve for Thanksgiving originated in 1955 with a recipe by Dorcas Reilly of the Campbell’s Soup Company, in collaboration with Olney and Carpenter, who were trying to promote their french fried onion business. The recipe caught on, and ensured the future of canned fried onions and the trend of using cream soup instead of homemade white sauce. Of course, you can make it from scratch without the processed name-brand ingredients.


9. Mincemeat Pie


   Mincemeat, a combination of meat, fruit, and spices not only tasted good to those who developed it, but preserved the meat for later consumption. Believe it or not, early mincemeat pies were baked in a coffin shape! One account has mincemeat brought back from the Crusades in the 11th century. Spiced meat was made into a pie for Christmas. The meat was combined with three spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves) to represent the three gifts of the wise men. The oblong coffin shape was meant to represent the cradle of the Christ child, and a representative doll was placed on top when the small pies were presented. Another account has the original pies shaped like coffins to represent Osiris, the Egyptian god of the dead who was celebrated on the winter solstice. Christians co-opted this tradition along with the other solstice celebrations for Christmas. Over the years, the amount of meat was diminished as we developed other methods of preservation, and now most mincemeat recipes contain only a bit of suet along with apples, raisins, and spices. However, you can still make it the traditional way with this 1796 recipe.


10. Pumpkin Pie


   The Pilgrims may have eaten cooked pumpkin, but they didn’t have it in a pie. The first recorded pumpkin pie recipe was published in France in 1653, where the fruit was called pompion. It spread to England and then to the New World, where the first American pie recipe (now called pumpkin) was published in 1796.

DIY GLITTER PUMPKIN PLACECARD HOLDER!

   This diy is comes from www.infarrantlycreative.net .  Use these for your upcoming Thanksgiving party or dinner.


   Have you started your fall decorating yet? I just started the process of getting some pumpkins out and adding a few little touches of fall to my home. I knew the new Glitter Blast spray paint from Krylon would look awesome on some Dollar Tree Styrofoam pumpkins. Then I went a step further and added a small scrapbook brad to make them place card holders. What a perfect personalized accent to your fall entertaining or Thanksgiving table.


glittered pumpkins (14)

Supplies:

Styrfoam pumpkins

Hole saw and drill

Spray primer

Krylon’s Glitter Blast Spray Paint

Krylon Clear Spray

Votive candle

Tea light candles

Brad or Thumbtack

I purchased two different size pumpkins from Dollar Tree. I used my hole saw bit (the size of the tea light candles) attached to my cordless drill to make a hole in the top of the mini pumpkins. Using a knife I scraped out the excess Styrofoam to create a nice even hole for the tea light to fit in. Then I spray primed the pumpkins and then used the Glitter Blast spray all over them. I let them dry and then I sprayed a clear coat over the top of them. You can seriously rub your hand all over it now and not a sparkle will come off.
Next I printed out the guest’s name on cardstock and cut it to size. Then I stuck a scrapbook brad or thumbtack into the pumpkin to hold it in place.



thanksgiving placecard holders


I also used the larger pumpkin with a votive (drilling with the same hole saw bit) thinking it would make a nice fall centerpiece.



glittered pumpkins (15)

fall centerpiece



Look at the depth of color in this. It has lots of golds, orange and brown flecks in it. So rich and beautiful!



glittered pumpkins (18)