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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 11/07/11

Monday, November 7, 2011

THANKSGIVING TURKEY TRIVA!!



  • The red or pink fleshy growth on the head and upper neck of the turkey is called 'caruncle'.

  • The bright red appendage on the neck of the turkey is called 'wattle'.

  • The black lock of hair found on the chest of the male turkey is called 'beard'.



  • Frozen, fully stuffed turkeys, ready to cook, were introduced in 1955.

  • Long before the Europeans came to America it were the Aztecs who used to domesticate turkeys to use them as food. They also used turkeys for religious sacrifices and their feathers for decoration.



  • The turkey was considered a sacrificial bird in Mexico.

  • Turkey is the state game bird of Alabama.




  • The Wild Turkey is the official state bird of Oklahoma.




  • The Wild Turkey was designated the state game bird of Massachusetts on December 23, 1991.

  • Turkey eggs are tan with brown specks.



  • Domesticated turkey hens that are artificially inseminated, lay around 80 to 100 eggs during a 25 week laying cycle and each egg takes 28 days to hatch.

  • The typical 15-pound turkey is seventy percent white meat and thirty percent dark meat. White meat contains less calories and less fat as compared to dark meat.



  • When Neil Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin went on the moon, they took 'roasted turkey' and all the trimmings with them.

  • In 2000 the total turkey production in the United States was 269,969,000 turkeys.
 



  • In 2002 the total turkey production in the United States was 270 million turkeys.

  • In 2004 the total turkey production in the United States was 263 million turkeys.




  • Turkeys have heart attacks. When the Air Force was conducting test runs and breaking the sound barrier, fields of turkeys would drop dead.



  • Benjamin Franklin called the turkey 'a true original native of America'.

  • Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to be the official bird of the United States but eventually lost out to the bald eagle.

THANKSGIVING IN CANADA, EH!





  In Canada, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday in October. The origin and history of Thanksgiving Day in Canada is different from the American Thanksgiving. Whereas the American tradition talks about remembering Pilgrims and settling in the New World, Canadians give thanks for a successful harvest. The geographical location of Canada is further north as compared to the United States therefore the harvest season falls earlier in Canada.
   In Canada Thanksgiving 2009 will be celebrated on second Monday in October - 12th October 2009.

History and Origin of Canadian Thanksgiving


There are three traditions behind Canadian Thanksgiving Day:

1. The farmers in Europe held celebrations at the time of harvesting to give thanks for their good fortune of a bountiful harvest and abundance of food. The farmers would fill a goat's curved horn with fruits and grains. This curved horn was known as a cornucopia or the horn of plenty. It is believed that when the European farmers came to Canada they brought this tradition of Thanksgiving with them.





2. The history of Thanksgiving in Canada is related to Martin Frobisher, who was an English navigator. He made a lot of efforts to find a northern passage to the Orient. Though he did not succeed in his efforts but he was able to establish a settlement in Northern America. In the year 1578, he held a formal ceremony, in what is now known as Newfoundland, to give thanks for surviving the long journey. This is considered the first Canadian Thanksgiving. Martin Frobisher was later knighted and an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean in northern Canada was named as ' Frobisher Bay' after him. When other settlers arrived here they continued this ceremony of giving thanks.

3. The third influence occurred in 1621 in what is now the United States. Here the pilgrims, who were the English colonists, celebrated their first harvest in the New World at Plymouth Massachusetts. By the 1750s this celebration of harvest was brought to Nova Scotia by American settlers from the south.
   In the 1600s, another navigator Samuel de Champlain crossed the ocean and arrived to Canada. Other French Settlers also came with him and their group held huge feasts of thanks for the harvests. On this event they shared their food with the Native American neighbors and thus involved them in their celebrations. Then they formed ' The Order of Good Cheer' which marked the harvests and other events as well.






   After the Seven Year's War ended in 1763, the citizens of Halifax held a special day of Thanksgiving.
   During the American Revolution the Americans who remained loyal to England moved to Canada. They brought with themselves the customs and practices of the American Thanksgiving to Canada.
   In 1879, the Parliament declared 6th day of November as the day of Thanksgiving and also declared it a national holiday. Over the years different dates were used for celebrating the Thanksgiving Day in Canada but the most popular date was the 3rd Monday of October.
   After World War I, both Armistice Day and Thanksgiving Day were celebrated on a common day that was Monday of the week in which fell the 11th day of November. Ten years later, in 1931, both Armistice Day and Thanksgiving Day became separate holidays and Armistice Day was renamed as the 'Remembrance Day'.
   Finally, on January 31st, 1957, the Parliament issued a proclamation to fix permanently the 2nd Monday in October as the Thanksgiving Day. The Proclamation goes as...

"A Day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed ... to be observed on the 2nd Monday in October…"

MINI CRANBERRY MERINGUE PIE! WHAT A TASTY LITTLE TREAT!

This come from www.marthastewart.com .  This is for a change of pace in stead of pumpkin pie.  Make these little individual treats for a refreshing after dinner dessert.






These mini pies feature a cranberry filling and are topped with billowy meringue. The recipe calls for the juice and zest of blood oranges, but if unavailable, regular ones work too.

If you can't find blood oranges, use regular ones for the zest and juice.
         
  • Yield Makes 12

Ingredients

  • All-purpose flour, for work surface
  • Pate Sucree
  • 3 1/4 cups fresh cranberries (12 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped blood orange zest, plus 1/4 cup blood orange juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of ground cloves
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3 large egg whites
  • Pinch of cream of tartar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8 inch thick. Cut out 4 1/8-inch fluted rounds, and fit into cups of a standard 12-cup muffin tin (not nonstick). Pierce bottoms with tines of a fork. Freeze 15 minutes.
  2. Line each shell with parchment paper, and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake 15 minutes. Remove weights and parchment. Return to oven; bake until bottoms are just turning golden, 5 minutes more. Transfer to wire racks; let cool 5 minutes. Remove shells from tin; let cool completely.
  3. Bring 2 cups cranberries, 1 cup sugar, and 1 1/2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Reduce heat, and simmer mixture, stirring occasionally, until cranberries have burst, about 5 minutes. Pour through a coarse sieve, then a fine sieve; discard solids. (You should have about 1 3/4 cups; if you have less, add water).
  4. Bring strained cranberry juice, 1/4 cup sugar, the zests, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and remaining 1 1/4 cups cranberries to a boil in a medium saucepan, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat; simmer, stirring occasionally, until cranberries are soft but have not burst, about 3 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, stir cornstarch, blood orange juice, and 1/4 cup water in a bowl; whisk into cranberry mixture. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook, stirring, until translucent, about 1 minute. Divide among prepared shells. Refrigerate until set, about 1 hour (up to overnight).
  6. Preheat broiler. Put egg whites and remaining 1/4 cup sugar into the heatproof bowl of an electric mixer set over a pan of simmering water; whisk until sugar has dissolved and mixture is hot to the touch. Attach to mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; beat on medium speed until foamy. Raise speed to high. Add cream of tartar; beat until medium, glossy peaks form. Divide the meringue evenly among pies.
  7. Set pies under broiler until tops are browned, 30 seconds to 1 minute.

SURIN ELEPHANT ROUNDUP AND FESTIVAL FROM THAILAND!



   The majestic Thai elephant has long been a central element in Thai culture and has held a respected place in Thai history. A symbol of power and grace, the elephant was revered by the ancient kings.
Elephants have been prominently featured in Thai legend, literature, art and architecture, and during the reign of King Rama II, an image of the auspicious elephant, symbolic of the King, was featured on the flag.





   In daily life, as man and elephant depend on each other, the elephant is treated as part of the 'family'. The everyday life of the Thai elephant and its keeper is the central theme of the world-famous Surin elephant round-up held annually.
   Province is the home of the Kui, who, for centuries, have tended to and trained elephants for use throughout Thailand. These handlers have great respect for their elephants.
   The majority of elephant owners and mahouts in Thailand today are descendants of the "Kui" tribe (or "Suay" in Thai). They are thought to have migrated from Cambodia to settle largely in the northeastern provinces near the Cambodian border. Known for their expertise in capturing, domesticating and training wild elephants, the life-long relationship of the mahout with his elephant is an integral element of Kui culture, tradition and the way of life. The elephant is his companion and a family member.




   The Surin Elephant Round-up usually takes place on the third weekend of November. It is of recent origin, first held in 1960. The people of Surin were traditionally excellent at capturing elephants in Cambodia, then training them as working animals. Civil war in Cambodia and the elephant's decreasing economic importance has forced the elephant handlers (mahouts) to turn to entertainment to make a living.
The event consists of a series of shows displaying the strength and skill of the animals, such as football games and tugs of war.
The Elephant Breakfast is a small part of the festival and is held on the Friday morning. A procession of up to over 300 elephants (2005) start marching through Surin city from the railway station area toward the Elephant roundabout at the south end of the city on the Prasat road.





The elephants carry dignitaries and also some tourists who dismount their steeds on arrival. Some elephants carry mahouts in authentic battle outfits from the Thai - Khmer - Laos battles. Intermingled with the elephant procession are local school children and teachers in traditional dress, dancing and playing music.
Once all the elephants have arrived then the banquet can begin, the tables of fruits are quickly cleared by the large team of elephants. Whatever leftovers there may be is not lost, as the local people take the leftovers to their own homes.
On the following morning (Saturday) the elephants and mahoots congregate at the Elephant Stadium to the south east of the city centre. Here the main show is performed culminating in a re-enactment of the battles of a past century. The show is repeated on Sunday morning.