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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 12/05/11

Monday, December 5, 2011

HOW ABOUT A LITTLE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY CAROL QUIZ!

   Turn these sentences into christmas carols. How many can you figure out? The answers are at the bottom... don't peek if you want to try it for yourself.

  1. Approach everyone who is steadfast.
  2. Ecstasy toward the orb.
  3. Listen! The Foretelling spirits harmonize.
  4. Hey, Minuscule urban area southeast of Jerusalem.
  5. Quiescent Nocturnal period.
  6. The Autocrat troika originating near the ascent of Apollo.
  7. The primary carol.
  8. Embellish the corridors.
  9. I'm fantasizing concerning a blanched yuletide.
  10. I apprehended my maternal parent osculating with a corpulent unshaven male in crimson disguise.
  11. During the time ovine caretakers supervised their charges past midnight.
  12. The thing manifests itself at the onset of a transparent day.
  13. The coniferous nativity.
  14. What offspring abides thus?
  15. Removed in a bovine feeding trough.
  16. Creator, cool it, you kooky cats!
  17. Valentino, the roseate proboscises wapiti.
  18. The slight percussionist lad.
  19. Father Christmas approaches the metropolis.
  20. Seraphim we aurally detected in the stratosphere.
  21. The tatterdemalion ebony atmosphere.










Here are the answers!
  1. Oh Come All Ye Faithful
  2. Joy to the World
  3. Hark, the Herald Angels Sing
  4. Oh Little Town of Bethlehem
  5. Silent Night
  6. We Three Kings
  7. The First Noel
  8. Deck the Halls
  9. I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas
  10. I Saw Momma Kissing Santa Claus
  11. While Spepherds Kept their Flocks by Night
  12. It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
  13. O Christmas Tree
  14. What Child is This?
  15. Away in a Manger
  16. God Rest ye Merry Gentlemen
  17. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
  18. The Little Drummer Boy
  19. Santa Claus is coming to Town
  20. Angels We have Heard on High
  21. O Holy Night

CHOCOLATE DIPPED CANDY CANES! YYUUUMMMM!

This neat diy comes from www.brownpaper--packages.com.  Looks so good, bet you can't stop at one.  Also would make a great swizzle stick for a mocha latte or a steaming cup of hot chocolate.


chocolate dipped candy canes






Hot chocolate is just about one of my favorite things ever, and when you add a chocolate dipped candy cane, it's perfection! These are delicious eaten on their own too--you just can't go wrong.

I thought these would be so fun for our Christmas morning hot chocolate, but I might need to make another batch--these are way too tempting to sit for 9 more days!

Chocolate Dipped Candy Canes

ITEMS YOU NEED:
  • candy canes
  • chocolate chips or melting chocolate--white & milk/dark
  • floral foam
  • tinfoil or wax paper
DIRECTIONS:

1. Starting at the crook, unwrap the candy canes halfway.




2. Melt your milk or dark chocolate in a large glass bowl. If you're using chocolate chips, make sure to add a little shortening--it will make the chocolate much more smooth and easier to work with. For one bag of chips, I use about 1 T. of shortening.





3. Dip the crook and top half the candy cane into the chocolate, holding it by the bottom wrapped part. Twist and shake off any excess chocolate, then stick it into the floral foam to dry. Once you're finished dipping, place into the fridge to firm up--about 5 or so minutes.





4. Once firm, take the candy canes out of the fridge, and lay them out on a piece of aluminum foil or wax paper. Melt the white chocolate chips in a small glass bowl until smooth. Place the white chocolate into the corner of a sandwich bag, then snip off a tiny piece of the corner--now you have your piping bag! Drizzle the white chocolate over the chocolate, then let harden.\

*I was able to dip almost 2 boxes (around 20) with 1 bag of chocolate chips.





These would be adorable in bags or buckets, and given as gifts...to anyone!




CHRISTMAS IN SWITZERLAND!!!



    Imagine a white robed angel whose face is delicately hidden by a veil, held in place by a jeweled crown, walking into your families Christmas gift exchange. The glow of the candles on the tree enshroud his form with a beautiful orange glow, as he enters and hands out presents from the basket held by his child helpers. A bit different from a traditional American Santa stories, this Swiss traditional story of the Christkindli is a well-known tradition in Switzerland. Most Swiss children eagerly await the arrival of the Christ Child in his reindeer drawn sleigh to come bearing gifts for everyone.




    For the week preceding Christmas, kids in Switzerland dress up and visit others bearing small gifts. Bell ringing competitions between villages to call people to midnight mass have become common traditions, as have the gathering after the service for families to share giant homemade donuts (ringli) and hot chocolate.
    Because Switzerland's traditions stem mainly from 4 different cultures, Switzerland offers a wide variety of traditions and celebrations at Christmas time. Aside from native Swiss influences, Swiss Christmas times are also influenced by German, Italian, and French customs and traditions. Gifts are given by some on Christmas Eve, and by others on New Year's Day. Though many celebrate gifts brought by Christkindli, others believe the generous spirits of St. Nicholas or Father Christmas and his wife Lucy to be responsible for the gifts. The manger scene still holds significant symbolism and importance in heralding the arrival of Christ, but the Christmas tree is also an icon. Carols are sung by Sternsingers dressed as the Three Kings in 4 languages. It seems that Switzerland has remained neutral even in holiday spirit.




    Other holiday celebrations in Switzerland include the Chlaujagen Festival or the Feast of St. Nicholas, it is celebrated on December 6th. A procession of lifetrager parade down the street wearing huge illuminated lanterns shaped like Bishop's mitres on their heads. Regardless of which tradition a Swiss family follows, it would seem that Switzerland has the Christmas spirit. I imagine, Christmas in Switzerland must be quite romantic and fairy tale like. As the German speaking Swiss say, "Frohliche Weihnachten"!, or "Merry Christmas"!


BUILDING GLITTER HOUSES FOR YOUR TREE OR FOR A CHRISTMAS DISPLAY!






  This comes from www.bigindoortrains.com .  Make a few or many, maybee enough for your very own Christmas village.  Enjoy!

Building a Glitterhouse

The house shown in the photo is a good starting product for learning to build "putz" houses.

What You Will Need

If you are going to build vintage-style cardboard houses, stop throwing away used, clean cardboard yesterday. Save cereal boxes, the backs of writing tablets, anything flat, firm and clean, that you can save. Please keep some corrogated cardboard on hand, too - it makes the best bases. In addition, for this project you'll need:
  • A sharp mat knife or Xacto knife (or both)
  • A stiff metal ruler
  • Elmer's white Glue-All. A glue stick would also come in handy.
  • Clear glitter. I use the “Sulyn” brand.
  • Several sheets of acid-free white bond paper
  • Flat white paint (flat latex interior wall paint is good) to prime the building (and give it the chalky feel of the original)
  • Acrylic paint in the colors you plan to use for the house.
  • Other accessories, such as bottle brush trees, that you plan to use to finish the house.

Note:: Our article on What You Need to Build Glitterhouses lists many other materials and tools that will help you work more quickly and effectively.

Printing the Plans



Double-click on this image to see a higher resolution pattern. Double-click on this image to see a higher resolution pattern.

Double-click on the plans above to see the large versions. You should be able to print the big version at the size you need either of the following ways.

  • If you have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer, click the following links to see the PDF versions: Select the print option, tell it to "auto rotate and center" or whatever else you need to make it go to Landscape mode. Don't select the "scale to page" or "shrink to fit" option. Print.

  • If you don't have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer or for some reason that doesn't work, open the big GIF versions by clicking on the reduced plans above. Choose the "file, page setup" from your browser. When the page setup menu comes up, select "landscape mode." If you CAN choose to NOT scale the picture, do so. This may mean that part of the page gets clipped on your printer, but the plan should sprint to the right size. If they don't you should be able to tweak the size either in the print program or in any graphic program you have on your printer.

If neither of those work, contact Paul and ask him for help - that's his department. :-)

Building the Base


Click for bigger photo.

The base is a rectangular "box" that is decorated before the house and trees are installed. For this project, it should be about 4 1/4" square, and about 1/2" high.

Note: For this project, Howard cut the base and fence pieces out at the same time. The fence pieces are made from card stock such as posterboard or cereal box cardboard. If you wish, you may use different materials for the fence, including miniature wooden snow fence from the craft store or a rustic rail fence you make from twigs.
Cut And Glue The Base - Usually the best method is to make a base from layers of corrugated cardboard glued together in a sandwich. You then wrap and glue a strip of thin poster-board or cereal-box cardboard all around it to camouflage the rough edges of the corrugated cardboard.




Click for bigger photo. Click for bigger photo.



Wrap the Base - When the base is built, you then cover it with white bond paper just like you would wrap a gift, except that all surfaces of the paper cover must be glued down to the box. A glue stick works great for this.




The finish coat of paper is glued down everywhere so it becomes a part of the surface and recreates the pasteboard finish of the original glitterhouses. Click for bigger photo. Click for bigger photo



Note: More details about building bases are provided in our article: Building Glitterhouse Bases
Attach the Fence - When the glue on the base has dried, glue the fence pieces to the base.
Prime the Base - When all the glue has dried, paint the base with the flat white paint. This provides an even finish that will hold the acrylic paint and glitter. If the fence is made of card stock, prime it, too.

Prepping the Structure Pieces

The house, roof, chimney, and chimney cap need to be cut from thicker cardboard, such as the cardboard from the back of a writing tablet.




Click for bigger photo


  1. Carefully transfer patterns of all pieces to the cardboard building stock. A .05 mm lead mechanical pencil and a “C-Through” brand ruler make this accurate and easy.
  2. Put new blades in the mat knife or X-acto knife (or both) that you will be using.
  3. Score the fold lines before you begin cutting out the parts (although you may do the roof later, if you wish, after you've checked the overhang). Use the metal ruler or other steel edge as a guide.
  4. Still using a steel-edged ruler as a guide, cut out the shapes. Watch your fingers.
  5. Double-check the roof size. The most important thing is that it has an overhang on all sides just like a real house. After you determine where the peak of the roof should be, score the crease.
  6. Cut the door and window frames from thinner stock, such as posterboard or cereal box cardboard.

Assembling and Painting the House

  1. Using Elmer's white Glue-All or a similar product, assemble the house, glue on the roof, chimney with chimney cap, trim details plus door and window frames. I would do this in steps so that you are not trying to hold, tape, or clamp a lot of small pieces at one time.

Click for bigger photo.


White glue works best if you apply a thin coat to each mating surface and wait a few moments for the glue to become tacky. Do not glue the house to the base until you have applied the glitter (below).
Note: Sometimes I add a sub-base to the house. This could be in the form of 1/4"-inch square pieces of balsa wood or strips of corrugated cardboard glued around the inside bottom edge of the house wall where it meets the base. This gives you a larger gluing surface for mounting the house to the base.




This sub-base made of corrugated cardboard provides a little more strength to the house and gives a better surface for gluing to the base.  Click for bigger photo. The house and base have now been primed with a flat interior wall paint that provides a consistent surface for the next coat.  Click for bigger photo.




  1. Prime the house, including trim, with flat white wall paint. Don’t skip this step; it gives you a uniform surface for painting.
  2. Paint the house in your choice of colors. I use acrylics from the Wal-Mart craft department. For anything that is painted gold, silver or bronze, I use “Testors” brand model paint.



Note Howard's signature 'Dr. Seuss' color choices and white paint 'globs.'  Having exaggerated colors and patterns is important because the clear glitter actually tones things down a little.  Click for bigger photo.




  1. Paint the base and fence. A white base with random swirls and dabs of very light pastel blue and pink are a good choice. Paint the fence a color that ties in with the rest of the house but is dark enough to contrast with the base. I suggest you not use yellows, beiges or greens in the snow.


    Click for bigger photo.


  1. Add clear glitter to the house and the base. Brush on a thin, but even coat of undiluted white glue and sprinkle on the glitter. Don’t try to do the entire house or base at once. White glue starts to film-over and dry quickly so just do a wall or a section at a time. The glue dries clear so don’t judge the final look until the glue is dry.
  2. Glue the window covering material on the inside of the house. I use colored velum or colored “cellophane type” material. Red seems to be the traditional color but you can use any color you like.
  3. Glue the finished house to the finished base. Fill in any gaps between the house and the base with white glue and sprinkle on more glitter.

For this structure, Howard chose a bottle brush and a small Christmas tree ornament shaped like a snow man. Click for bigger photo.

Adding Additional Scenery


Add yard accessories such as a small figurine and a bottle-brush tree.
I like to use miniature Christmas tree ornaments such as a Santa, deer and snowmen. You may even choose to make you own accessories.
[Editor's note: I have seen cheap party favors and cake decorations that were also suitable - it's okay if your accessories look a little "tacky." For trees, some folks cut apart a loofah sponge and dip it into deep blue-green paint, wring it out, and let it dry to simulate the lichen-like organic material used on some of the original houses. - Paul]
When everything is glued together and the glue has dried, touch up any place that the glitter hasn't covered evenly.


Conclusion

You can see that, when you get to the gluing, painting, and glittering stages, there's a lot of "hurry up and wait." That's one reason many people who build modern putz house recreations work on two or three houses at the same time - you can work on the second house while the glue is setting on the first one, and so on.




If you are paying attention, you'll notice that the snowman from the photo of the finished project house above has traded places with the santa from the house from our title photo (center), and a new plastic snowman is now guarding our project house.  In the meantime, Santa has moved to a house we haven't seen yet in this article. I hope this just means that Howard doesn't have his accessories glued down yet, and that they're not playing 'musical houses' on their own. What this photo is supposed to show is that Howard doesn't exactly build these one at a time.   Click for bigger photo.


Click for bigger photo.

Bonus: Church Conversion Plans


When you're done with your first house, and thinking about the next project, here's an idea. Many glitterhouse sets had seven houses (often identical except for colors and accessories) and a church. If you want your glitterhouse collection to represent that tradition, you can use the plans below in addition to the plans and directions above to convert your next putz house into a church.



Click to see the full-sized plan.

As always you have two options for downloading and printing the plan:
If you do build a church, you'll find a stained glass window pattern you can use on Paul Race's Free Large Scale Signs and Graphics web page.
Also, if you find yourself looking for the old-fashioned celophane with gold windowframes printed on it, you'll find many choices at Papa Ted's Reproduction Parts page.
The following photos show the steps in building a church the same basic way you build the little glitterhouse above. Note that in this version of the project, Howard changed the shape of the windows and added two, but the basic process is the same.

Cut and score the building pieces according to the directions above.
Click for bigger photo.

Assemble the base and other sub-assemblies according to the directions above. Click for bigger photo. Put the sub-assemblies together to check the fit. Once you are satisfied that they will look right together, prime the subassemblies with flat white paint, paint the subassemblies, glue the windows in place, and glue the subassemblies together. Click for bigger photo. Finish with glitter and accessories according to the directions above. Click for bigger photo.

 

*CHRISTMAS IN CHINA!



   Christmas is one of the most celebrated holidays in the world. Both Hong Kong and Macau designate Christmas as a public holiday on December 25. Both are former colonies of Western powers with (nominal) Christian cultural heritage. But in China, December 25 is not a legal holiday. The one percent of Chinese citizens who consider themselves Christians unofficially, and usually privately, observe Christmas. But with the world becoming a global village, Christmas has now become a festive occasion for an increasing number of Chinese as well. It is worth noting how commercial Christmas decorations, signs, and other symbolic items have become increasingly prevalent during the month of December in large urban centers of mainland China, reflecting a cultural interest in this Western phenomenon, and, sometimes, as part of retail marketing schemes. Arrival of winter marks the celebration of Christmas in China. People decorate their homes with dazzling Christmas lights, beautiful Christmas tree and mouth watering Christmas recipes.




   In Chinese Happy/Merry Christmas is 'Sheng Dan Kuai Le or 圣诞快乐' in Mandarin and 'Seng Dan Fai Lok or 聖誕快樂' in Cantonese. 
   In China, Santa is known as 'Sheng dan lao ren' (Traditional: 聖誕老人, Simplified: 圣诞老人; means Old Christmas Man). Christmas trees are called "trees of light" and are also decorated with paper chains, paper flowers, and paper lanterns. Children hang up muslin stockings in hopes that Dun Che Lao Ren (China's Santa) will visit and fill them with presents. Stores have men dressed as Santa Claus handing out candy and waitresses with Santa hats. The booming commercialism which has spread outward from Beijing has been called a Chinese phenomenon. It started out as a friendly gesture or business ploy aimed at Christian visitors.
   Giving gifts is an integral part of the Christmas celebrations, and it is no exception in China. People exchange beautiful Christmas gifts with each other. These Christmas gift are the ideal way to express your love and care to the loved ones. Christmas celebrations signify spreading and happiness to the loved ones. In China, people begin their Christmas celebrations with beautiful Christmas decorations. Christmas




decorations usually incorporate lighting houses, using beautiful paper lanterns, paper flowers and lanterns. Another major highlight of Christmas celebrations are the local festivals in China. People participate in this festival. According to Chinese tradition, people go to Church. In China, the most important winter festival is Spring Festival. During this festival, children are gifted new clothes, mouth-watering meal, small toys and firecracker. Worshipping ancestors is the major part of this festival.
   Although Christianity is unofficial in China, there are an estimated 10 million baptized Christians (about 1 percent of the population) who celebrate the birth of Jesus at Christmas time. The popularity of midnight mass has grown so swiftly over the past few years that most Catholic churches can not hold the numbers who come out Christmas Eve. While Christmas Day is not a public holiday, Christmas celebrations are becoming more popular in China itself. Particularly in urban areas, one can find





Christmas trees, lights, and other decorations on the streets and in department stores. Attendance at Christmas Eve mass has also become more popular in recent years. With each passing year, the Chinese public is becoming more conscious about the significance of Christmas, and more and more people are beginning to participate and immerse themselves in the spirit of Christmas celebrations.

DIY ICE BOTTLE COOLER!

   This comes form www.celebrationsathomeblog.com .  A cool idea to add a little decor to that holiday buffet and to add some color to your holiday table.








This icey bottle cooler as seen on my Holiday Bar Design, is a stylish way to present vodka or white wine on the bar while keeping it cold at the same time. It’s a simple project but you need to give yourself a couple of days to freeze the layers. This works well for vodka because it can go in the freezer without turning solid, and is best served very cold anyway. Here’s how it works…





What you’ll need:
  • A 3-liter empty soda container that you will cut the top off of
  • distilled water for more clarity in your end result
  • fruit such as lemons, limes, star fruit, or cranberries
  • duct tape – only in case your bottle floats up in the water
Place the bottle of vodka inside the 3-liter container and fill with an inch or two of the distilled water – freeze until solid.
When the base is frozen you can begin adding slice fruit or berries around the bottle and fill with more water to just cover the fruit layer - freeze until solid.
Once the first fruit layer is frozen you can add your next layer in the same manner, filling with distilled water enough to cover the fruit. This layer should take you to the top of the vodka bottle – freeze until solid.
Once the cooler is frozen, take it out of the freezer so it can thaw slightly – enough to work the 3-liter container off of the ice (about 30 minutes). You may still need to dip in luke warm water to help ease it off. Once you have the ice cooler out of the container store it in the freezer until ready to set on your bar.
Important Tips:
When setting the ice cooler out on your bar, set it in a shallow dish or tray that is lined with a small towel. This will prevent the icey base from slipping around on the dish, as well as help contain the melting ice. Under normal home temperatures this should last a few hours.
If you would like to use the ice cooler for white wine or other cold drink, just insert an empty bottle (wine bottle or other decorative bottle) into the 3-liter container and follow the same steps. You can add your beverage to the empty bottle inside (using a funnel) after the cooler is frozen.

SNOWFLAKE SUGAR COOKIES!

   This comes from www.bakersroyale.com.  These look so good you don't even want to eat them. But, if we have to snack on them, what's the harm.  Go ahead and make a batch or two.


Snowflake Sugar Cookies – Dress up your holiday cookie tray with some fun and colorful snowflake sugar cookies.



Snowflake Sugar Cookie


Snowflake Sugar Cookie
I don’t make sugar cookies often, in fact I usually only make them for certain holidays and sometimes for birthday requests. I love the beauty and creativity of them, but they are massively labor intensive and I’m not the most patient person for baking projects like this.
But to save myself a step, I skipped flooding the cookies for the simple design you see in the picture. The royal icing I used is from here. It’s easy to work with and has the perfect consistency for simple lines like the one you see on these snowflake cookies.



Snowflake Sugar Cookies Bakers Royale2 Snowflake Sugar Cookies

The cookie recipe is one I have been working with and fine tuning over the years. Actually, the recipe started with me trying to re-create those soft pillow-y sugar cookies from the Ralphs grocery store. You know the ones that are super thick and covered in frosting. I don’t usually like grocery store made cookies but these are awesome, well minus the too-sweet frosting that I always scrape away. But I love the texture of the cookie portion, it’s soft and almost cake-like in texture. I still haven’t figured out how to replicate them, so if anyone has some suggestions or a recipe for it, please help a baker out and give me some tips.

A few notes:
  • The dough will be wet and sticky once mixed, so it requires some chilling before working with it.
  • Divide the dough and create four round flat discs for easy handling. Cover each disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to three days or freeze up to 3 months.
  • To keep the cookies nice and even in thickness, I use these rings on my rolling pin.
  • Lastly, for the curious, using the cream cheese versus all butter gives the cookie a softer texture; and using powdered sugar versus all granulated sugar, also helps to keep the cookie soft and tender while giving it a tighter crumb and a less crisp texture.

Basic Sugar Cookie

Preparation: Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Line bake sheet with parchment paper.
  • 3 cups of flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup cream cheese, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar, sifted
  • 2 eggs, plus1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
Instructions:

1. In a bowl, whisk flour, baking powder and salt; set aside. Cream butter, cream cheese, sugar and powdered sugar until light and fluffy. In a separate bowl lightly mix eggs and vanilla together. With the mixer running on medium low, slowly add egg mixture to creamed butter mixture, continue mixing until combined. Turn off mixer, using a wooden spoon or a sturdy spatula gradually fold dry mixture into wet mixture and continue to fold until combined.

2. Divide the dough into four flat disc and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Remove chilled dough one disc at a time and roll on a lightly floured surface into 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into desired shapes. Bake cookies for about 8-10 minutes.

8 ADORABLY UGLY HOLIDAY MASCOTS!!

   Everyone has heard of the Ugly Sweater parties and poking fun at fruit cake and white Chrsitmas trees certainly never gets old. There’s something FABULOUSLY tacky about the holidays; the lights, the glitz, the ornaments and the ceramic figurines of holiday characters. The internet is a constant reminder that the holidays are upon us and these characters are the perfect representation of annoyingly endearing. Ho ho ho!



grinch 8 Adorably Ugly Holiday Mascots

1. The Grinch

 He’s green, he looks stinky- and he has a frown that could make a happy baby cry. The Grinch is endearing even before he decides to give Cindy Lu Hu her Christmas tree back, you can’t help but have a bleeding heart for such a sad soul. He’s the only “thing” with matted green body hair that looks, dare I say, huggable?

jack skellington


2. Jack Skellington

    Generally, I wouldn’t say skeletor beings are loveable, Mary-Kate Olsen included. That however, is not the case with Jack Skellington of Nightmare Before Christmas. Just as Johnny Depp is adorably attractive and creepy in Willy Wonka, or the Alice and Wonderland trailers- Jack Skellington serenades you to love him in all of his bowtie pinstriped glory. Only Tim Burton could pull off holiday cheer and eerie imagery all in one adorably ugly protagonist.

ralphie 8 Adorably Ugly Holiday Mascots


3. Ralphie Parker

    Holiday highlight: The 24 marathon of Christmas Story on TV, who doesn’t want to watch the 25 times in a row?! Don’t judge the math equation there, 25 just seems like a good amount for a marathon. Ralphie is that character that makes even the bullies in the audience root for the underdog. Ralphie is so charming, his attempt to convince his parents to buy him a BB Gun is actually sort of persuasive. Would someone just let the boy have the gun? Santa? No? And for God sakes, those glassssses. Adorably ugly indeed.

ugly dog christmas


4. Rascal the Worlds Ugliest Dog
    What is it about ugly dogs? You sort of want to look away, but you can’t help letting out a gigantic, “AWWWWWW” it’s both an awe of horror and embrace. If you haven’t seen Rascal’s singing ugly dog videos all over Facebook and Twitter, well then you haven’t gotten into the Christmas spirit. Watching babies talk about stocks is entertaining and so is watching dogs sing a perfect operatic version of Silent Night. Sigh.
scrooge 8 Adorably Ugly Holiday Mascots


5. Ebenezer Scrooge

   The antagonistic character of the Christmas Carol is cold-hearted, greedy and at a total loss of holiday spirit. Scrooge despises all things that invoke cheer or express any signs of joy. If that’s not an off-putting disclaimer then I’m not sure what is. Still, Scrooge is that Grandpa that you’ll try to squeeze a smile out of, not matter how impossible it may seem. Eventually, as well all know he comes around…. Every Bah humbug has some hope!

The Abominable Snowman


6. The Abominable Snowman

    Even though this bigfoot-esque character looks like he could eat you for Christmas dinner, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer finds the adorably ugly character to be a friend, despite his bad looks and intimidating stature.


angry elf


7. The Angry in Elf

   Or, ahem, excuse me- “little person.” Serious scowling but still adorbs when drop-kicking Will Ferrell’s Buddy Elf character to the board room floor.


charliebrowntree 8 Adorably Ugly Holiday Mascots


8. The Charlie Brown Christmas Tree

    Yes, the tree itself is a mascot. I’ve had my fair share of “Charlie Brown” trees and even when you’re peaking through the gaps in the branches, while the rest of the tree sags and tilts- it’s still your special tree. Your personal celebration of the holiday, whether it’s adorably ugly or not, it’s Christmas!