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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 01/02/12

Monday, January 2, 2012

PAPER FLOWER TUTORIAL!







   This comes from www.lorajeansmagazine.blogspot.com.  Have some fun a make a few of these for your party.

 

Paper decoration tutorial





I wanted to try my hand at making Martha's paper bag project from scratch. (Using book pages not paper bags.) And I thought I'd share my little adventure with you! You can make these with any kind of pretty paper that pleases you. These would make great party decorations so keep these in mind next time a birthday comes around.


The supplies you need are,
  • 6 or 8 sheets of paper (I used 8 old book pages)
  • double sided sticky tape
  • scissors
  • hole punch
  • string

Fold each paper to create the paper bag-like fold in the sides. Tape the seam into place. Make 8 of these.
Punch a hole in the bottom of each one and cut the tops into a petal shape.
Tape them all together placing a piece of tape just above each hole.

Thread a string through all of them, then tie a knot. Not too tight though, so it can fan out later.
Leave a good length of string on the end so you can hang it up when your done.
Last, put tape on the top one and attach it to the back one. The middle ones will fan out nicely.
Hang it up and there you go! Feel free to ask any questions.



TOURNAMENT OF ROSES PARADE!!









   This uniquely American event began as a promotional effort by Pasadena's distinguished Valley Hunt Club. In the winter of 1890, the club members brainstormed ways to promote the "Mediterranean of the West." They invited their former East Coast neighbors to a mid-winter holiday, where they could watch games such as chariot races, jousting, foot races, polo and tug-of-war under the warm California sun. The abundance of fresh flowers, even in the midst of winter, prompted the club to add another showcase for Pasadena's charm: a parade would precede the competition, where entrants would decorate their carriages with hundreds of blooms. The Tournament of Roses was born.



1958 US Continental Army Band
1958 U.S. Army Continental Band



   "In New York, people are buried in snow," announced Professor Charles F. Holder at a Club meeting. "Here our flowers are blooming and our oranges are about to bear. Let's hold a festival to tell the world about our paradise."
    During the next few years, the festival expanded to include marching bands and motorized floats. The games on the town lot (which was re-named Tournament Park in 1900) included ostrich races, bronco busting demonstrations and a race between a camel and an elephant (the elephant won). Reviewing stands were built along the Parade route, and Eastern newspapers began to take notice of the event. In 1895, the Tournament of Roses Association was formed to take charge of the festival, which had grown too large for the Valley Hunt Club to handle.
   In 1902, the Tournament of Roses decided to enhance the day’s festivities by adding a football game – the first post season college football game ever held. Stanford University accepted the invitation to take on the powerhouse University of Michigan, but the West Coast team was flattened 49-0 and gave up in the third quarter. The lopsided score prompted the Tournament to give up football in favor of Roman-style chariot races. In 1916, football returned to stay and the crowds soon outgrew the stands in Tournament Park. William L. Leishman, the Tournament’s 1920 President,



1905 Chariot Races
1905 Chariot races


envisioned a stadium similar to the Yale Bowl, the first great modern football stadium, to be built in Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco area. The new stadium hosted its first New Year’s football game in 1923 and soon earned the nickname “The Rose Bowl.”
   The Tournament of Roses has come a long way since its early days. The Rose Parade’s elaborate floats now feature high-tech computerized animation and exotic natural materials from around the world. Although a few floats are still built exclusively by volunteers from their sponsoring communities, most are built by professional float building companies and take nearly a year to construct. The year-long effort pays off on New Year’s morning, when millions of viewers around the world enjoy the Rose Parade.
   Nicknamed “The Granddaddy of Them All” the Rose Bowl Game has been a sellout attraction every year since 1947. That year’s contest was the first game played under the Tournament’s exclusive agreement with the Big Ten and Pac-10 conferences. The 1998 Rose Bowl Game was the 52nd anniversary of that agreement, the longest standing tradition of any collegiate conference and a bowl association. Now, as part of the Bowl Championship Series, the Rose Bowl has hosted the National Championship Game between the top two teams in the nation in 2002, 2006, 2010 and will host the National Championship again in 2014.





Rose Parade History

   This uniquely American event began as a promotional effort by Pasadena's distinguished Valley Hunt Club. In the winter of 1890, the club members brainstormed ways to promote the "Mediterranean of the West." They invited their former East Coast neighbors to a mid-winter holiday, where they could watch games such as chariot races, jousting, foot races, polo and tug-of-war under the warm California sun. The abundance of fresh flowers, even in the midst of winter, prompted the club to add another showcase for Pasadena's charm: a parade would precede the competition, where entrants would decorate their carriages with hundreds of blooms. The Tournament of Roses was born.
   "In New York, people are buried in snow," announced Professor Charles F. Holder at a Club meeting. "Here our flowers are blooming and our oranges are about to bear. Let's hold a festival to tell the world about our paradise."




   During the next few years, the festival expanded to include marching bands and motorized floats. The games on the town lot (which was re-named Tournament Park in 1900) included ostrich races, bronco busting demonstrations and a race between a camel and an elephant (the elephant won). Reviewing stands were built along the Parade route, and Eastern newspapers began to take notice of the event. In 1895, the Tournament of Roses Association was formed to take charge of the festival, which had grown too large for the Valley Hunt Club to handle.
   The Tournament of Roses has come a long way since its early days. The Rose Parade’s elaborate floats now feature high-tech computerized animation and exotic natural materials from around the world. Although a few floats are still built exclusively by volunteers from their sponsoring communities, most are built by professional float building companies and take nearly a year to construct. The year-long effort pays off on New Year’s morning, when millions of viewers around the world enjoy the Rose Parade.








History of the Tournament House


   Tournament House is the official headquarters of the Tournament of Roses Association, its staff and the 935 volunteers who work year-round to organize the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game.
The house was built by architect G. Lawrence Stimson in 1906 and his father, prominent builder George w. Stimson. The younger Stimson paid great attention to detail in his design and construction. Within the structure’s three stories are 22 rooms and 18,500 square feet of artistry; ornate molded ceilings, inlaid marble floors, and finely crafted woodwork. The interior’s full grandeur was restored in a renovation project completed in 2002.
   This elegant Italian Renaissance-style mansion was presented to the city of Pasadena in 1958 by the William Wrigley family for the exclusive use of the Tournament. Chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr. purchased the home in 1914 for $170,000. A year later, he paid $25,000 for the adjoining property, clearing the way for the 4.5-acre garden. In its time, the Wrigley’s winter residence was considered a more modest home on “Millionaire’s Row.” But of their six homes across the country, the Pasadena getaway was Mrs. Wrigley’s favorite. She delighted in watching the parade from her own front yard.
   The interior of the house features richly paneled rooms, inlaid marble floors and ornate molded plaster ceilings. Among the highlights of the tour are a one-of-a-kind Waterford rose bowl commissioned for the centennial of the Tournament of Roses; and the formal portrait of the reigning Rose Queen. Exhibited items of interest are crowns and tiaras worn by former Rose Queens and Princesses and Rose Bowl related trophies and memorabilia.
   Outside the House, the Centennial Rose Garden features the All-America Rose Selections (AARS) award-winning Tournament of Roses rose developed especially for the Tournament of Roses Centennial. Surrounding Tournament House are the Wrigley Gardens, which feature a 4½-acre floral display of more than 1,500 varieties of roses, camellias and annuals.
   Tournament House and its surroundings provide a majestic backdrop for many Tournament activities, including the highly anticipated announcements of the Grand Marshal, Rose Queen and Royal Court. The many treasures throughout the house recall past tournaments and highlight a rich history of grace and style.

OREO COOKIES AND CREAM NO-BAKE CHEESECAKE!







   This recipe comes from www.bakersroyale.com .  Two of my favorite desserts together into one.  My Oh My!  Enjoy!


Oreo Cookies and Cream No-Bake Cheesecake ~ An adult dessert gets some kid lov’n with an Oreo crush.



Oreo Cookie and Cream No Bake Cheesecake Bakers Royale1 Oreo Cookies and Cream No Bake Cheesecake


Oreo Cookie and Cream No-Bake Cheesecake
What kid doesn’t love Oreos, right? But not every kid likes cheesecake. Please tell me I am not the only one that acquired a taste for cheesecake through the years.
In fact, I think my first bite of cheesecake was at a Cheesecake Factory when I was in high school. But maybe that had more to do with my parents being very strict, old world Asians. They convinced my siblings and me that American restaurants were for Americans, along with other weird ideas like makeup was to be worn when I was 30-something and boyfriends were had after college graduation. And by that I mean after I became a doctor.
Yeah, so much for parental influence. Eventually we westernized my dad but never my mom. She’s still wondering which cult abducted me every night and returned me to my bed before the sun rose.
My sweet tooth and baking obsession as attributed by her is an American influence that she hopes to wash away with fish sauce.
Uh, good luck! I’ve entered Willy Wonka’s world and I never want to leave.
I love this latest creation to come out of my Wonka factory: Oreo Cookies and Cream No-Bake Cheesecake. Seriously, one of my easiest desserts ever—ten minute prep, throw it in the fridge to set, and enjoy childhood bliss with every Oreo filled cheesecake bite.


A few notes:
  • I made these as Mini Oreo Cookies and Cream Cheesecake, but the recipe will work just as well in a 9 inch cheesecake pan or springform.
  • If you do not have vanilla powder you can omit it. I don’t recommend vanilla extract or it will end up coloring your cheesecake with a slight brownish color.
  • For best results refrigerate overnight.
  • Keep refrigerated up until 20 minutes before serving.
  • Other no-bake cheesecakes you may like White Chocolate Tuxedo Cheesecake and SoNo’s No-Bake Cheesecake.

Oreo Cookies and Cream No-Bake Cheesecake


Makes 16 mini 2 inch cheesecakes or one 8 inch cheesecake.

Ingredients:


Crust:

 
1 1/2 cup crushed graham cracker
1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
7 tablespoon unsalted butter(melted)

Cheesecake:


2 ¼ cups heavy cream
1 pound cream cheese, softened
2/3 cup sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 teaspoon vanilla powder
¾ cups Oreo Cookies, crushed



Instructions:


Crust:

1. Combine graham cracker crumbs with sugar.
2. Add melted butter and blend until combined.
3. Press into pan. Set aside.


Cheesecake:

1. Beat heavy cream until medium peaks form. Set aside.
2. Add cream cheese, sugar, salt, vanilla powder, lemon juice to a bowl and beat with a paddle attachment until smooth (approximately 3-5 mins). If you do not have a stand mixer or a paddle attachment a hand beater will work as well, but will take twice as long to achieve a smooth consistency.
3. Add cream cheese mixture to heavy cream and beat until incorporated.
4. Gently fold in Oreo cookies.
5. Fill chosen pan with a slight mound at the center, as the cheesecake will become slightly sunken at the center.
6. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours to set or overnight for best results.
7. Remove from refrigerator and smooth top to level with edges. Serve with whipping cream and garnish with mini Oreos.


THE HISTORY OF THE WATERFORD CRYSTAL NEW YEAR'S EVE BALL!!!









    The most famous ball in America will make it's decent into Times Square this December, ringing in more than just another "Happy New Year"! among fellow Americans. While it may be the largest New Year's Eve Ball ever to grace New York City. It may also be the most eco-friendly ball as well. The new ball is 20% more energy efficient than the previous one, which will make it a sure crowd pleaser for the many Americans who are becoming more eco-conscious. At 12 feet across and 11,875 pounds, the ball will be the largest ball to drop in Times Square since the beginning of the tradition. It also contains 2,668 Waterford Crystals and 32,256 LED's, which make the ball capable of producing more than 16 million colors and several billion patterns. It will be the most beautiful and breathtaking New Year's Eve Ball to date. But where did the idea for the ball come from? Who started this tradition, and when was the Waterford Crystal introduced into this famous past time?



the ball from 1978


The History of the New Year's Eve Ball and the Waterford Crystal

    In 1907, Jacob Starr created a giant ball combining wood, iron, and one hundred 25 watt light bulbs. The New Year's Eve Ball would become known as one of the most famous tributes tot he New Year in American history. Weighing in at 700 pounds and stretching 5 feet across, the new tradition was born. The first ball was used every year until 1920, when it was replaced with a 400 pound wrought iron ball. From the twenties to the mid fifties the ball remained unchanged.
    Unfortunately, during World War II, the New Year's Eve Ball did not make its usual descent to earth. In 1942 and 1943, the ball remained unlit in fear of war time enemies attacking. However, in 1944, the famous New Yorker returned to it's beloved place high atop Times Square.



2000-2007 ball


    In 1955, the ball was replaced yet again for a third time to a smaller, 200 pound aluminum ball. While the ball was lighter in weight, it was no less famous and no less elegant, and this ball reigned until the 1980's.
    1981 brought a new decade for the ball, while the original ball itself was not actually replaced, the light bulbs, were replaced with red ones. The pole from which the famous ball dropped was painted green-all of this was done to simulate a "Big Apple". This was being done to promote the "I Love New York" campaign-more famously known today as the "I heart NY T-shirts, coffee mugs and so forth that we see today. The ball was returned to its famous bright white bulbs in 1989, at the end of the campaign.






Aside from a few colored light bulbs and a new paint job, the New Year's Eve Ball remained the same for 40 years. In 1995, the ball was all but brought into the new century. It was updated to an aluminum skin with strobe lights, rhinestone gems and more-all generated by computers. This was also the beginning of the true Waterford Crystal that we know and love today.
    For the millennium, the ball was completely designed. Aside from the ball that will grace New York's Time Square this December, the ball form weighed in at over 1,000 pounds-making it the largest in both weight and width (at 6 feet across). It contained a mixture of 168 halogen bulbs and 432 light bulbs of red, green, blue, yellow and white-which were all used in different "Hope" campaign themes.
    This famous New Yorker has been around for over 100 years and will be making its drop from 475 feet above Times Square.