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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 03/11/12

Sunday, March 11, 2012

DIY DESIGNER LIKE POTS FOR YOUR SPRING FLOWERS!

   This comes from www.christinechitnis.com .  Turn those garden variety clay pots into something everyone will admire.  Enjoy! The only thing I would suggest when you make these yourself is to spray some outdoor clear spray on the pots to keep them waterproof and if you put them outside, put another coat onto the fabric also.



Pretty Pots
 
 
This might be my favorite craft so far, and I got the idea after seeing one too many beautifully patterned pots that were just out of my price range! Nothing a little Mod Podge and pretty fabric can't fix! The total cost of this project was about $3 a pot.




Fabric for pots
 
 
Materials:Terracotta pots
Mod Podge
Brush
Fabric



Inside view
 
 
 
This works better in description form, rather than step-by-step: Start by cutting a length of fabric that will wrap once around your pot. Leave extra room for folding it over on the top and bottom. Cut slits in the fabric around the top, to avoid puckering as you make your way around. Begin by coating a small section of the pot with Mod Podge. Stick the beginning of your fabric length to the pot and once it is in place, coat the fabric with Mod Podge. Continue doing this all the way around, without worrying about the top or bottom of the pot. When the outside of the pot is finished, trim your fabric so that less than an inch hangs over the top and bottom. Begin at the top, folding the fabric into the pot in pleats so that it lays nice and flat around the rim. Coat in Mod Podge. Do the same for the bottom, folding the fabric in pleats so that the bottom edge of the pot remains smooth. Coat any loose flaps of fabric with Mod Podge. Now let your pot dry.




Pretty Pots
 
 
 
I would avoid using these pots outside, because if they get wet, the glue will most likely wash off! But packaged with some seeds and cute gardening gloves, these would be an adorable Valentine's Day gift!

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES, YOU CAN'T PASS THESE UP!

   Bring the street party to your backyard with these one-bite cookies. Chocolate chip cookies filled with more rich chocolate? Party on.



Double Chocolate Chip Cookies with Bourbon Ganache Recipe



Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup butter, softened

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar

  • 3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

  • 1 (12-oz.) package semisweet chocolate morsels
  • Parchment paper
  • Bourbon Ganache

Preparation

  1. 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Beat butter and sugars at medium speed with a heavy-duty electric stand mixer until creamy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating just until blended after each addition. Add vanilla, beating until blended.
  2. 2. Combine flour and next 2 ingredients in a small bowl; gradually add to butter mixture, beating at low speed just until blended. Stir in morsels just until combined. Drop dough by level spoonfuls onto parchment paper-lined baking sheets, using a small cookie scoop (about 1 1/8 inches).
  3. 3. Bake at 350° for 12 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from baking sheets to wire racks, and cool completely (about 30 minutes).
  4. 4. Spread Bourbon Ganache on flat side of half of cookies (about 1 Tbsp. per cookie); top with remaining cookies. Cover and chill cookies 2 hours or until ganache is firm.

SCOPPIO DEL CARRO FROM ITALY!!!




    The Scoppio del Carro ("Explosion of the Cart") is a folk tradition of Florence, Italy. On Easter Sunday, a cart, packed full of fireworks and other pyrotechnics, is lit and provides a historic spectacle in the civic life of the city.

A Little History on the Festival

    The event of the Scoppio del Carro has its origins in the First Crusade, when Europeans laid siege to the city of Jerusalem in a conflict to claim Palestine for Christianity. In 1097, Pazzino de' Pazzi, a Florentine from a very prominent family, was by tradition, the first man to scale the fortified walls that surrounded Jerusalem. As a reward for this act of bravery, his commander gave him three flints (fire starters) from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which were then carried back to Tuscany. These were and still are kept in the Chiesa delgli Santi Apostoli.




    It became the practice for a "holy fire" to be struck from these flints at Easter tide, which was then carried throughout the city by groups of young men bearing torches. In time, this tradition evolved into something similar to what is seen today.....a cart bearing a large candle was rolled through the city to the cathedral, from where the holy fire would be distributed.
    By the end of the 15th century,the Scoppio del Carro transformed into its present form.
    The ultimate origins of the event may be of pagan origin, since it involves a display of great noise and light to ensure a good harvest. Additionally, farmers from the Florentine countryside still observe the Scoppio del Carro with interest because of this.




The Main Event

    On the morning of Easter Sunday, the 30 foot tall antique cart ( in use for over 500 years), moves from the Porta al Prato to the Piazza del Duomo. Hauled by a team of white oxen, festooned with garlands of the first flowers and herbs of spring, the cart is escorted by 150 soldiers, musicians, and people dressed up in their 15th century costumes.





    Meanwhile, a fire is struck using the historic flints form Jerusalem at ApoChiesa degli Santi Apostoli. It is then carried by the procession to the cathedral square by members of the Pazzi family, clerics, and city officials.
    The cart is loaded with fireworks while a wire, stretching to the high altar inside the churches cathedral, is fitted with a mechanical dove (the "columbina"). Shortly thereafter, at the singing of the song, "Gloria in Excelsis Deo", during Easter Mass, the cardinal of Florence light a fuse in the columbina with the Easter fire. It then speeds through the church to ignite the cart of fireworks outside.




    During all of these stages, the bells of Giotto's campanile ring out.
The complex fireworks show that follows, last approximately 20 to 30 minutes. A successful display from the "Explosion of the Cart" is supposed to guarantee a good harvest, stable civic life, and good business.