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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 06/13/12

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

DIY AIR DRYED PORCELAIN TYPE CLAY!

   This diy comes from www.thejunkwave.com .  Another alternative than going out and buying some. Cheaper to make and use than buying your own.  Especially if you love to do arts and craft. This stuff comes in hand in making different holiday gifts and decorations.  Now go make something!


How to make your own air dried porcelain with common household ingredients

Anything that is quick, affordable and makes beautiful things is a craft winner for me. But…I often find myself uninspired for something new and different.





I’ve found it in air dried porcelain (aka Porcelana Fria).
What will someone make with
  • 3 cups of white glue (PVA)
  • 3 cups of cornstarch (Corn flour)
  • one tablespoon of white vinegar
  • one tablespoon of glycerin (health food or hobby shop), and
  • 2 tablespoons of canola oil?




The beautiful mouse and necklace pictured (compliments of Espirit) is the answer! There’s more fantastic ideas on the site of the woman who’s recipe I have used: Libreria Andrea
Amazingly simple and a GREAT school holiday project, get the kids into the kitchen to cook up some home made, air dried, porcelain.

Let’s make it:



cold porcelain recipe


In a mixing bowl (or non-stick pan) mix 3 cups of white glue and 3 cups of cornstarch. Add one tablespoon of white vinegar, one tablespoon of glycerin, 2 tablespoons of canola oil. Blend thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Heat in a microwave oven or in a saucepan on the stove.
For microwave heating: Cook in a microwave-compatible recipient for 2 to 3 minutes on high (for a 800W oven; longer for a less powerful oven). Stop every 30 seconds to mix. During the last 30 seconds, stop every 10 seconds to check the consistency of the mixture. As soon as the dough becomes thick and lumpy (like ricotta cheese), remove from the oven.
Stove top: Cook in a saucepan over low heat for about 15 minutes. Stir with a wooden spoon. As soon as the dough becomes thick and lumpy (like ricotta cheese) and starts to pull away from the side of the pan, remove from heat.
Cooking is the only tricky step to making cold porcelain. You need to cook just long enough to thicken the dough but not too long, otherwise it will be too hard and impossible to work with.
Coat your working surface and your hands with cold cream or hand cream. Knead the dough until it has cooled. It can be quite hot to begin with, so take care. The dough is sticky and lumpy at first, but as you knead it, it becomes smooth and supple. Make a large ball and store it in an airtight container for 24 hours before using it.
This one’s a big thumbs up from me. I can feel some air dried porcelain Christmas decorations coming up.

TOP 5 ZOMBIE MOVIES!!




    We all know the scoop about Zombie movies. A deadly virus or chemical agent is released. A guy / girl is subjected to the deadly toxin and is gruesomely transformed into a hideous monster who desires the flesh of living humans. Thus a Zombie is born. As it bites person after person, it spreads it's horrific condition exponentially across communities, states and countries and pandemonium is spread globally . These things are all the makeup of a thrilling edge of your seat horror flick. The following are the top 5 most terrifying Zombie films of all time. In no particular order.






Night of the Living Dead (1968)

    No Zombie movie would be complete without this horror classic. George Romero's first and thought to be the birth of the modern zombie and zombie film. This Flick tells the story of an African American man, a White woman, and five others who are panic ridden by the unexplained presence of living dead. They barricade themselves in a farm house in the middle of nowhere with no hope but to not be killed by the terrifying monsters.








Shaun of the Dead (2004)

    If Zombie movies were equal to pop music. Shaun of the Dead would be a hit. This movie brings horror, fun, and pop culture into one flick and does a great job at all of the above. Shaun and his cohorts set out on a wacky / scary adventure dodging Zombies while also tending to life's minor hiccups and obstacles. This film also has a great sound track.







Dawn of the Dead (2004)

    This film is a definite spine chilling, teeth chattering, keep up up at night because you are scared horror movie. A woman awakes to find her family, the neighborhood, and the entire community are all out the eat her. People all over are being mauled by undead humans and turning into zombies and it spreads like wildfire. She ends up trapped in a mall with many other characters who share the common goal of trying to escape alive.







Resident Evil (original, Apocalypse, Extinction) (2002)

    All three Resident Evil films are brilliantly made productions. Alice is a super human experiment with a knack for annihilating the undead. An incredibly hot Milla Jovovich first punches kicks and destroys zombies in a hidden underground facility where the T Virus (zombie juice) has been exposed to the population. In the second addition (Apocalypse), Alice scourges the quarantined city in search for a little girl with a cure to the T Virus. In the third installment (Extinction), an extremely powerful Alice tries to leads a caravan of refugees into a sanctuary where zombies do not exist.







28 Days Later (2002)

    This movie along with it's sequel has got to be the scariest movie of all time. Test subjects from an Animal testing facility are released into the public releasing with it a deadly zombie toxin referred to as Rage. 28 days later, a man wakes from a coma, alone, in a hospital and has no idea of the outbreak. He shortly finds the meaning if of the empty streets and obvious signs of chaos. He fights terrible Zombies throughout the flick. Eventually he finds himself stuck in the middle of flesh eating zombies and sick ans twisted militants.

ROYAL HIGHLAND SHOW FROM EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND!




    The Royal Highland Show is Scotland’s leading outdoor event showcasing all that’s best in farming, food and countryside.
    The show will be the 172nd and the 52nd to be held at Ingliston, near Edinburgh. It regularly attracts over 175,000 visitors with the 2010 attendance breaking all records at 187,644.
    Sponsored by The Royal Bank of Scotland, the show is one of the country’s most iconic and historic brands, mixing serious agri-business with fun, music and entertainment. For 2011, host area the Borders will feature food, textiles, heritage, countryside and visitor attractions from the region.






    Look out too for the Countryside Area, Forestry Arena, Agri-Trade Area, Children’s Discovery Centre, Outdoor Living Area, Motor Zone, Equestrian Village, Renewables Section, Food and Drink Hall, Shopping Arcade, Honey Marquee and Handcrafts Pavilion...not to mention 5000 of the UK’s finest cattle, sheep, goats and horses plus competitions, demonstrations and loads of all-action features! “The Greatest Show


History

    Although the Royal Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland was established in 1784, it wasn’t until December 1822 that it held its first show at Queensberry House in Edinburgh’s Canongate when according to The Scotsman newspaper "...between sixty and seventy five cattle were exhibited." There were also eight New Leicester sheep and "two beautiful pigs."






    Around 1000 members and public attended that first event held on a site adjacent to today’s Scottish Parliament. Gate takings were just over £52, seemingly sufficient to cover overheads.
   It’s a far cry from those humble beginnings in the 19th century to the present Royal Highland Show where there’s up to 5000 head of livestock, attendances of around 170,000 and costs associated with staging the event approaching £1.5 million.
    Following the inaugural event, the show became a fixture in Edinburgh and Glasgow before moving to Perth in 1829, thereby beginning the tradition of itinerant shows that was to last 130 years before the first “Highland” was held on the permanent site at Ingliston in 1960. The 2010 show is the 170th to be staged.





    During the late 19th and into the 20th century, the show had begun to take on more of a semblance of its modern day equivalent with agricultural implements being exhibited, livestock classes open to breeders from other parts of the UK and prizes for the likes of butter and cheese.
    Since moving to Ingliston, however, the show has developed beyond recognition and is now internationally recognised as an annual celebration of Scottish farming, food and countryside, attracting an audience far beyond its farming roots - a showcase of all that’s good about Scotland.







Royalty and The Royal Highland Show

    By the early and mid 19th century, the Highland and Agricultural Society was a much revered national institution enjoying the patronage of many of Scotland’s dukes and earls, landowners, agricultural pioneers and the Royal family
    In 1859, the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII, seventeen years old and a student at Edinburgh University, twice visited the Edinburgh showyard. In 1872 Queen Victoria expressed a desire to be enrolled as an ordinary member and in 1894, the Duke of York, the future George V, visited the Aberdeen show as President of Society.
Various members of the Royal family have served as Presidents of the Society, have been awarded Honorary Membership or have visited the Royal Highland Show.







    The title Royal was bestowed at Inverness show in 1948 by King George VI, father of the current Patron, Her Majesty The Queen.
    The 2010 Royal Highland Show has set a new attendance record of 187,644 - an increase of more than 11,000 on last year’s record of 176,522.
    The show, which closed on Sunday night, recorded increased visitor numbers on all four days including an all time daily high of 57,754 on Saturday.






    Show Manager David Dunsmuir said: “We are absolutely thrilled with these figures. Although the fine weather and a focused publicity campaign were obvious influences, there is more to it than that. Our core aim is to showcase the farming and food industry and by combining that with an associated programme of entertainment and activity, we have a formula that is obviously appealing to both our specialist audience and the general public.
    “Staging an event of this magnitude takes a huge effort. Exhibitors, trade organisations and staff all played their part and deserve a pat on the back, but major thanks go to the public who came in their droves. ”







   Scottish Government Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs Richard Lochhead commented: “This has undoubtedly been one of the most successful Royal Highland Shows of all time. The food and farming sectors appear to be weathering the recession better than many other industries and there has been a real feel good factor this year.
“The visits from the EU Agriculture Commissioner and Chairman of the European Parliament’s Agricultural Committee speak volumes for Scotland’s reputation as a land of food and drink. It proves beyond doubt that we are driving forward the debate on CAP and influencing and shaping change. ”
   Individual daily attendances were as follows (2009 figures in parentheses): Thursday 39,891 (38,506) Friday 47,885 (47,714) Saturday 57,754 (51,307) Sunday 42,114 (38,995).







    The 2012 Royal Highland Show will be held on June 21 -24. The show, at the Royal Highland Centre, Ingliston, will once again be sponsored by The Royal Bank of Scotland who last week announced a new five year sponsorship package.