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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 09/05/12

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

DIY REPURPOSING A PAPERBACK BOOK INTO AN APPLE SCULPTURE!!

   This diy was found at www.creaturecomfortsblog.com .  This would make a very special gift for that very special someone.









I’ve had an overwhelming response to this project and everyone wants a tutorial, so here you go.









First off, gather your supplies:
 
 
 
- book for dismembering, paperbacks are great
- template (I made half an apple out of a thick piece of chipboard)
- exacto knife with a very sharp blade
- clips
- glue stick
- snot dots
- ink or paint for coloring and something to apply it with
- decoration or embellishments
 
 
 
 
 





Step 1
My paperback book was too thick so I split it in half using my blade. Try and make a clean break or you will end up sacrificing some pages. Remove the cover.
 
 
 
 
 





Step 2
Lay the template down on the book and cut the pages around the template. Be careful not to cut in to the template and try to cut only a few pages down at a time to start. Try and make one smooth cut if you want to avoid rough edges. I personally like the distressed look.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Step 3
Remove the cut paper leaving the template in place. Cut and repeat. Cut and repeat. I found that I was cutting about four pages at first and then ended up cutting a lot more at a time once I got the hang of it.
 
 
 
 




Step 4

Once the book is cut, trim any rough edges you don’t want. Especially those that are hanging off. This will help for the next step: inking.





Step 5
For color, I used ink refill and diluted it a bit because I wanted it to soak in to the paper. I applied it with a cotton ball to the edge of the book. (I have not tried paint so I’m not sure what technique you will need to keep the pages from sticking together.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Step 6
Once the edges were done, I applied the ink/water mixture to the inside of the pages by using a “flip and wipe” method. I turned the book over and then did the same thing on the other side. I did not try and get every page but rather a sampling of pages for a worn effect. Let it dry or cheat and use a heat gun to lightly dry the edges. Which method do you think I used?
 
 
 
 
 






Step 7
Once the book is dry you will need to stretch the spine so it opens. The book I used was not terribly worn so it did not fan well on it’s own. I stretched it at random to loosen it up.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Step 8
I chose to use a stick with a little leaf for my decoration. On the pumpkin I used wired ribbon, wire, and lace. I covered the stick with snot dots and layed it in the top of the apple. It’s starting to look like an apple now, isn’t it?
 
 
 
 






Step 9
Apply a good craft glue stick to one side of the book making sure you go all the way to the edges. Carefully close book and clamp it tight on the glued pages. I think that paperclips would work for this, too. Let it dry.
 
 
 




Step 10
Add any additional decorations at this point. Fan the book a couple of times to get an even shape. You are done.
 
 
 
 

DIY HOT BUTTERED FLUFFY PRETZELS!

   This recipe comes from www.kingarthurflour.com  .  Who doesn't love fresh, hot pretzels????.....Anyone?.....Anyone?    Make some of these and you'll have your family eating out of your hand!  (only if you want them to!)



Recipe photo



Pretzels are available crisp and hard from your grocery or, if you're lucky and in the right place, soft and chewy from street vendors. Our recipe is for the soft, chewy kind. The melted butter brushed over the crust is a bonus street vendors don't offer!



Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 8 large pretzels




Dough

  • 2 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 7/8 to 1 cup warm water*
  • *Use the greater amount in the winter, the lesser amount in the summer, and somewhere in between in the spring and fall. Your goal is a soft dough.


Topping

  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 2 tablespoons baking soda
  • coarse, kosher or pretzel salt, optional
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Directions

 
1) To make dough by hand, or with a mixer: Place all of the dough ingredients into a bowl, and beat until well-combined. Knead the dough, by hand or machine, for about 5 minutes, until it's soft, smooth, and quite slack. Flour the dough and place it in a bag, and allow it to rest for 30 minutes.
 
2) To make dough with a bread machine: Place all of the dough ingredients into the pan of your bread machine, program the machine for dough or manual, and press Start. Allow the dough to proceed through its kneading cycle (no need to let it rise), then cancel the machine, flour the dough, and give it a rest in a plastic bag, as instructed above.
 
3) To make dough with a food processor: Place the flour, salt, sugar and yeast in the work bowl of a food processor equipped with the steel blade. Process for 5 seconds. Add the water, and process for 7 to 10 seconds, until the dough starts to clear the sides of the bowl. Process a further 45 seconds. Place a handful of flour in a bowl, scoop the slack dough into the bowl, and shape the dough into a ball, coating it with the flour. Transfer the dough to a plastic bag, close the bag loosely, leaving room for the dough to expand, and let it rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
 
4) While the dough is resting, prepare the topping: Combine the boiling water and baking soda, stirring until the soda is totally (or almost totally) dissolved. Set the mixture aside to cool to lukewarm (or cooler).
 
5) Preheat your oven to 475°F. Prepare a baking sheet by spraying it with vegetable oil spray, or lining it with parchment paper.
 
6) Transfer the dough to a lightly greased work surface, and divide it into eight equal pieces (about 70g, or 2 1/2 ounces, each).
 
7) Allow the pieces to rest, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Pour the baking soda/water into a 9" square pan.
 
8) Roll each piece of dough into a long, thin rope (about 28" to 30" long), and twist each rope into a pretzel. Working with 4 pretzels at a time, place them in the pan with the baking soda/water, spooning the water over their tops; leave them in the water for 2 minutes before placing them on the baking sheet. This baking soda "bath" will give the pretzels a nice, golden-brown color.
 
9) Transfer the pretzels to the prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle them lightly with coarse, kosher, or pretzel salt, if desired. Allow them to rest, uncovered, for 10 minutes.
 
10) Bake the pretzels for 8 to 9 minutes, or until they're golden brown.
 
11) Remove the pretzels from the oven, and brush them thoroughly with the melted butter. Keep brushing the butter on until you've used it all up; it may seem like a lot, but that's what gives these pretzels their ethereal taste. Eat the pretzels warm, or reheat them in an oven or microwave.

 

NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD OF WALES!!




The National Eisteddfod of Wales is one of the great festivals of the world, attracting over 160,000 visitors every year. An eclectic mixture of culture, music, visual arts and all kinds of activities for people of all ages, there’s something for everyone on the Maes during the first week of August every year.
The Eisteddfod is a travelling festival which belongs to the people of Wales – wherever they live, and this is an integral part of its appeal. The festival visits areas in north and south Wales alternately, and hosting the National Eisteddfod is a great boost for any area.
It’s an ideal opportunity to promote and encourage people to use and learn Welsh locally, to take part in cultural activities in their area, and it’s also a great opportunity to promote the region as a tourist destination. The economic effect on the area is huge, with the Eisteddfod contributing between £6-8 million to the local economy during the week.




The Eisteddfod is the home of literature, music, dance, recitation, theatre, visual arts, science and technology, and all types of culture in Wales, and although the festival only lasts for a week, the preparatory work and the buzz surrounding the event and all its activities lasts for more than two years before the Eisteddfod. Many areas choose to continue organising events promoting the Welsh language and culture once the festival is over.

History

The National Eisteddfod of Wales can be traced back to 1176 when it is said that the first Eisteddfod was held, under the auspices of Lord Rhys, at his castle in Cardigan. There he held a grand gathering to which were invited poets and musicians from all over the country. A chair at the Lord's table was awarded to the best poet and musician, a tradition that prevails in the modern day National Eisteddfod.






Following 1176, many eisteddfodau were held throughout Wales, under the patronage of Welsh gentry and noblemen. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, an Eisteddfod of historical significance was held at the Ivy Bush Inn in Carmarthen, when the Gorsedd of Bards first became officially associated with this national event. By this time, the Eisteddfod had developed in to a fully-fledged folk festival on a large scale.
In 1880, the National Eisteddfod association was formed and charged with the responsibility of staging an annual festival to be held in North and South Wales alternately, and with the exception of 1914 and 1940, this target has been successfully achieved.




Gorsedd of the Bards

The Gorsedd of Bards of the Isle of Britain has a long and interesting history dating back to the end of the eighteenth century.
Iolo Morganwg, an academic, originally from Llancarfan in Glamorgan, created the Gorsedd, and this happened on Primrose Hill, London in 1792. Iolo Morganwg believed that the fact that the culture and heritage of the Celts belonged to the Welsh was a fact which needed emphasising, and he believed that the creation of the Gorsedd was the perfect vehicle to reflect this.
In 2009, a commemorative plaque was unveiled on Primrose Hill to celebrate Iolo Morganwg’s contribution and the creation of the Gorsedd of the Bards of the Isle of Britain.




The first link between the Gorsedd and the Eisteddfod was in 1819 at the Carmarthen Eisteddfod, and since the creation of the National Eisteddfod in its current form in 1861, a strong and close relationship has developed, with the Gorsedd playing an important role in the Eisteddfod every year.

The Gorsedd Today

Most members of the Gorsedd are poets, writers, musicians and artists, who either join when they win one of the Eisteddfod’s main competitions, sit an exam or when they are awarded a degree in Welsh or Music from a Welsh university.
A number of people are also honored by the Gorsedd every year, to celebrate their contribution to Wales, and these include such notable people as Bryn Terfel, Tanni Grey-Thompson, Rhodri Morgan and Ioan Gruffudd.






The Gorsedd also honours some people who have worked tirelessly for the National Eisteddfod through the years – often behind the scenes, and these individuals receive the same honour as our famous faces.
New members are honoured in ceremonies held at the Gorsedd Stones on the Eisteddfod Maes on the Monday and Friday mornings of the festival week. These ceremonies are led by the Archdruid, who also leads the main ceremonies held on the Pavilion stage during the week. The Archdruid is elected for three years, and he is the Head of the Gorsedd of the Bards.






For many, the Gorsedd processions through the Eisteddfod Maes are amongst the week’s highlights. These are held three times during the week following the main ceremonies held on the Pavilion stage.
Monday is the Crowning Ceremony; on Wednesday, the Eisteddfod and the Gorsedd honours the winner of the Prose Medal, and the Chairing of the Bard ceremony is held on Friday. The Gorsedd escort the winning bard or writer – if there is a winner – from the Pavilion and around the Maes. This is an opportunity for the public to enjoy the splendour of the Gorsedd and congratulate the successful winner.

Celebrate 150

In 2011, the modern day National Eisteddfod of Wales celebrates 150 years. Over the past century and a half, Wales has changed, and the Festival has developed, broadening its appeal in response to these changes over the years. Today’s National Eisteddfod is very different to the festivals of the 1860s, but its primary aim remains the same, to promote the language and culture of Wales.





The National Eisteddfod is a travelling festival, visiting north and south Wales alternately, providing the whole of Wales with an opportunity to visit the festival locally every few years, creating an inclusive and welcoming environment, relevant to communities in different parts of Wales, and giving each festival an unique vibe and local feel, whilst retaining its national identity.
Our 150th anniversary is an opportunity to celebrate the festival’s contribution to the cultural, economic, linguistic and community legacy of Wales, whilst looking to the future and at the way in which the festival will develop in years to come. Please join us on our journey and support us in celebrating Wales’ leading festival, the National Eisteddfod.