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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 10/09/12

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

13 FACTS ABOUT FRANKENSTEIN!





Take some dead body parts. Stitch them together. Add one mad scientist,
and toss in a lightning bolt for good measure. What do you get? The Frankenstein
monster! Alternately portrayed as both mindless killer and a misunderstood gentle giant, the Frankenstein monster is a classic Halloween creep. Learn more about him with these 13 freaky facts. .
  1. The young Mary Godwin, later wed to poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, wrote Frankenstein at the age of nineteen.
  2. As a house guest of Lord Byron, Mary Shelley was invited to participate in a challenge. Byron, Shelley, and the other guests set about writing the most frightening story they could. Shelley won, she claimed that her inspiration came from a vision she'd had, wherein a pale student of science knelt over a body which he had just imbued with artificial life.
  3. Doctor Victor Frankenstein is the name of the mad scientist character who created the monster and gave it life.
  4. Frankenstein is a German name meaning, "stone of the Franks."
  5. Victor Frankenstein was based on a real person. Johann Konrad Dippel, who was a physician and mad scientist obsessed with creating life through scientific means. His birthplace? Castle Frankenstein, near Darmstadt, Germany.
  6. The name Frankenstein is commonly, but incorrectly used to describe the monster itself. Throughout the novel, Dr. Frankenstein refers to his creation as "devil", "fiend", and other venomous epithets-but the creature is never given a proper name.
  7. Frankenstein was released anonymously in 1818, and was originally sub-titles: The Modern Prometheus. Both Frankenstein and the Prometheus tale serve as warning against too-high aspirations.
  8. The Frankenstein monster first appeared on film in Edison Studios' Frankenstein of 1910.
  9. Universal Studios' Frankenstein was released in 1931. Actor Boris Karloff played the role of the creature. Bela Logosi was initially offered the role, but refused.
  10. The Frankenstein movies paves the way for many sequels, including Bride of Frankenstein, Son of Frankenstein, and Ghost of Frankenstein. Some notable Frankenstein parodies include Young Frankenstein, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, which features Doctor Frank N. Furter.
  11. The Frankenstein monster makes a modern screen appearance in 1994's Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, where he is portrayed by Robert De Niro. The monster is also featured in 2004's Van Helsing.
  12. Herman Munster, cosmetically based on Frankenstein's monster, was the father of a nice, if creepy, family in the television series The Munsters.
  13. In 2006, horror writer Dean Kootz penned a series of novels that reimagine the Frankenstein story in present-day New Orleans.

DIY PROP EYES FOR YOUR HOME HAUNT!

   This diy comes from www.thehauntingground.com .  These could be used in a skull or even a bunch of them in a jar.





Prop Eyez

Prop Eyez in use
Prop Eyez in a pair of Lindburg Skulls
Eyeballs can have a number of great uses in Halloween props. Giving eyes to some props like skulls and ground-breakers can add that “creep factor” that you just might be looking for. They can also be useful in any number of other props and decorations. A candy dish full of eyeballs for your Halloween party; a jar of eyes to adorn your witch’s arsenal of potion ingredients - the possibilities are aplenty. 
Real eyeballs are not so easily obtainable, and I’d imagine that the red tape one might have to cut through for a single pair would be far beyond the worth. I’d also be willing to bet that they would be pretty hard to work with, and likely wouldn’t last very long. With that in mind, I have discovered a budget friendly solution that will give your props that optical enhancement that they so deserve. Inspired by Easy Eyes from the Haunters Hangout website, I use a slightly different method to create my eyeballs. I’ve also created my own set of high detail printable irises (see link at bottom of page) for use with this method. In this tutorial, I’m going to share the process I use to create the eyeballs that I use in my props. 
To get started on this project, you will need the Following: 
  • 1″ wooden balls
  • White Acrylic hobby paint
  • Red Acrylic hobby paint (any dark red will work)
  • 1 sheet of Prop Eyez printable irises
  • Glue Stick
  • Modge Podge Gloss sealer
  • Scissors
  • 1/4″ broad tip hobby paintbrush
  • Fine tip hobby paintbrush
  • Drying rack (see below)
  • Electric drill w/ small drill bit (same size as posts on drying rack)
A handy tool for this project is the drying rack for the eyes. I made mine from two 4″ pieces of wire coat hanger and a small flat piece of scrap wood. Just drill two appropriately sized holes in the wood, cut two straight pieces of wire coat hanger and insert them in the holes. You will need to make sure that the drill bit is the same diameter as the coat hanger to ensure a tight fit. For the record, I used a thin wire hanger and a 47 gauge (0.0785″) drill bit. This will allow you work around the eyes completely without getting your fingers in the paint, and to set them aside to dry on your work surface. 
 With the drying rack ready, and all your supplies in place, it’s time to get started. The first step is to drill a small hole about halfway into each of the wooden balls. These holes will need to match the diameter of the coat hanger used on the drying rack. Once the holes are drilled, mount the balls on the rack. 
Paint each of the balls white. 2 or 3 light even coats will work much better than 1 heavy coat, and will probably take much less time to dry. 
Adding the red paintOnce the white paint is dry, you may choose to paint the backsides of the eyes red. If your eyes will be mounted in a prop where the backs will not be visible, you’ll probably want to skip this step. Using a piece of sponge, lightly drybrush the backs of the eyes with red paint about halfway around. The color should fade into the white gradually. 
Once your wooden balls are painted to your liking and dry, it’ll be time to add the Irises. Choose the desired color and pupil size from the printed Prop Eyez sheet and cut them out. When cutting out the iris, you should leave a small amount of white around the edge. This helps keep the iris’ shape and blends the color into the sclera (whites of the eye) more naturally. 
With the iris cut out, make a few (4-5) slits inward to the pupil around the iris. Don’t cut too far in, just cut to the edge of the pupil. This will help the printed iris mold over the rounded surface of the eye without rippling. 
Using a glue stick, apply a liberal coat of glue to the back of the printed iris, and press the iris into place. Then roll the eyeball (iris facing down) on a table or other smooth hard surface. That will help smooth out the printed iris and any thicker spots of glue underneath. 
Blood VesselsOnce the iris is in place on each of your eyeballs, you may choose to add some blood vessels to the Sclera. There are several ways of doing this, and any of them work well. I just paint them in with a fine tipped hobby brush. Some folks use tooth picks to drag lines from a droplet of paint, and others have said they use red Sweater lint. Do whatever works best for you, or use your imagination and come up with a new way. 
The final step is to seal everything up. Coat each eye with 2 coats of Modge Podge Gloss, and then another 2 coats of the Modge Podge Gloss thinned down a bit with water. The second two (thinned down) coats help make for a nice glassy finish, which gives them a wet, realistic look. 
Tip: For a hazy, dead look, try adding paint to your final modge podge mixture. On the last coat(s) of Modge Podge, mix a drop or two of acrylic hobby paint, in the color of the haze you want, into your thinned out Modge Podge. Pale yellow works well for a Jaundace look, gray or white for a dead haze. When doing a haze, a little bit of paint goes a long way, so mix sparingly and test it out before you put it on the eyes.
The completed eye
The completed eye.
That’s all there is to it. Once dry, you have yourself a nice, realistic set of eyeballs that can be added to any number of Halloween props and party ideas. 
Prop Eyez
Click image for the Prop Eyes printable iris sheet

ATTACK OF THE MARSHMALLOW ZOMBIES! RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!!

   This diy comes from www.thedecoratedcookie.com .   This are really cool looking and easy to make for a Halloween party of any type.




Attack of the zombie marshmallows!!!

First we had ghosts. Then we had skeletons. And now….
Just like their predecessors, these are super-easy to make.
how to make zombie marshmallow pops


you will need:*
marshmallows
lollipop sticks
large confetti sprinkles
black and red food coloring pens
light corn syrup
toothpick
*Find the sprinkles and lollipop sticks in the craft store. You can probably find food coloring pens there, too, but I prefer Americolor Gourmet Writers.
what to do:
Lay a marshmallow on its side. Put a dab of corn syrup on the back of a confetti sprinkle with the toothpick and stick on the marshmallows where you want eyes (note some of my zombies only have one eye). Use the markers to draw dots, “x”s, mouths, eyes, blood, whatever you want. Insert a lollipop stick (if you want, see below without stick). You may need to let the corn syrup dry for a couple hours to get the sprinkles to adhere securely.
Linking to: Craft-O-Maniac Link Party!(My first “link party,” I hope I’m doing it right!)


THE FEAR OF CLOWNS IS NO LAUGHING MATTER, ESPECIALLY IF THEY ARE KILLER CLOWNS THAT HAVE ENTERED YOUR DREAMS!!!







 Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right! Here I  am stuck in the middle of them! (a little verse from a Gerry Rafferty song).  Clowns could be a nightmare to someone suffering from Coulrophobia.  It is estimated that as many as 1 out of 7 people suffers from a fear of clowns.
   For those suffering from Courophobia, Bozo and his red-nosed brethren are anything but funny or amusing.  Surprisingly, the fear of clowns is one of the top ten most common phobias.  While it may seem funny that grown men and women alike may shirk in fear from seemingly harmless, albeit doofy characters with over-sized shoes and rainbow suspenders, for them it is no laughing matter. While the cause of Courophobia isn't necessarily known and is different for everyone, one common theory holds that the root cause most likely stems fro a traumatic childhood experience.  Maybe you were squirted by one too many trick flowers while a white faced clown laughed in your face; or perhaps you had a coat rack in your room growing up that resembled an evil menacing bozo-like character when the lights were off.









 The image of the evil clown has become a cliche' in today's society.  From Bart Simpson's "Can't sleep clowns will eat me" to The Joker of Batman fame, clowns are not always the picture of fun.  Whatever the case, I'm sure the release of "It", The Steven King novel and movie that had a clown named Pennywise in it.  He had razor sharp teeth and drug children into the sewer.










 John Wayne Gacy, an American serial killer, convicted and executed for the rape and murder of 33 boys and men, between 1972 and the time of his arrest in 1978, was known as the "Killer Clown" because he attended many block parties dressed in a clown suit and makeup under the name of Pogo the Clown.  Koko the Killer Clown appears in a sideshow at Coney Island.  Homey D. Clown from the comedy show "In Living Color", was an ex-con drug addict with a penchant for violence.  Not to mention the 1988 movie "Killer Clowns from Outer Space", and the nasty clown doll in the movie "Poltergeist".










   As phobias are no laughing matter, the same with all mental health problems, it is worth noting that there are steps for overcoming such aversions if you are one of the poor people facing such a crippling and debilitating fear that it impedes your life.  There are sufferers who are so petrified of clowns that they are sent into panic attacks at the mere sight of an outfitted clown.  There are treatment methods that include hypnotherapy, medications, and immersion therapy; where the patient is forced to face the very crux of their phobia.  Luckily, as it isn't everyday that the circus comes to town and you're forced to be faced with those bizarre polka-dot painted clowns everyday, most people re likely to simply avoid them when they can and get on with their perfectly productive lives!











Still, it leads one to question what a particularly evil posse of clowns could be capable of and what sort of havoc they could incur.  Hollywood has given us a few possible ideas, and if you aren't a Courophobic yet, you may be after viewing one of these clown horror movies!


  • Fear of Clowns
  • IT
  • The Clown Murders
  • Secrets of the Clown
  • Dead Clowns
  • We All Scream for Ice Cream
  • Final Draft
  • Killer Clowns From Outer Space
   You don't have to be a kid to be sent crawling under your bedsheets for safety.  If the creepy little clown mobile hanging in your room sends you crying to mama, you may want to switch that nightlight on for safety!!!