Quantcast
DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 10/29/12

Monday, October 29, 2012

HALLOWEEN LAYER CAKE!

   This recipe comes from www.tasteofhome.com .  A really, really great looking cake for the Holidays.




Halloween Layer Cake Recipe




Halloween Layer Cake Recipe





  • Prep: 20 min. Bake: 30 min.
  • Yield: 12-16 Servings
203050

Ingredients




  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup baking cocoa
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange extract
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange peel
  • 10 drops yellow food coloring
  • 6 drops red food coloring

  • GLAZE:

  • 3 ounces semisweet chocolate
  • 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream
  • Candy corn for garnish

Directions

  • In a bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Combine flour, baking powder and salt; add alternately with milk to creamed mixture. Mix well. Combine cocoa, water and vanilla; stir in 2 cups cake batter.
  • Pour into a greased and floured 9-in. round baking pan. Add orange extract, peel and food coloring to remaining batter. Pour into two greased and floured 9-in. round baking pans. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until cake tests done. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks.
  • In a bowl, beat all frosting ingredients until smooth. Place one orange cake layer on a cake plate; spread with 1/2 cup frosting. Top with chocolate layer; spread with 1/2 cup frosting. Top with second orange layer. Frost the sides and top of each.
  • Microwave chocolate and cream on high 1-1/2 minutes or, stirring once. Stir until smooth; let cool 2 minutes. Slowly pour over cake, letting glaze drizzle down sides. Garnish with candy corn. Yield: 12-16 servings.

  
Frosting


  • 3 packages (3 ounces each) cream cheese, softened
  • 5-3/4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 8 drops yellow food coloring
  • 6 drops red food coloring

MAKE YOUR OWN GHASTLY, HORRORIFIC FAMILY PORTRAITS FOR HALLOWEEN!

   This great tutorial was found at www.lifeartcollide.blogspot.ie .  Being a home haunter and loving Halloween, this  hit me right between the eyes, as something I've always wanted to do.  These are really cool and would make great pics to have around during Halloween.


Make Your Own Freaky Family Portraits For Halloween



Making your own freaky family photo arrangement is super simple using PSE (Photoshop Elements). You don't need any previous experience manipulating photos to create these fun portraits.

Over the summer I scoured garage sales for used picture frames, never paying more than 50 cents per frame! Believe me, people were more than happy to get rid of them. I often went home with an armload for less than one dollar.
Here are some of the before and after examples I used. The pictures are greatly altered in the final product so the original person is unrecognizable . To find suitable photos hop on the net and type "Victorian portrait photography" in the search engine, that will give you a nice selection to play around with. I also used "skull", "ghoul", "ghost", etc.
Here's how you do it:
Open PSE and select two saved photos you want to merge.

Click File, then New, then Photomerge Faces
Use the Alignment tool to mark each photo

Use the Pencil and Eraser tool to merge your selections
When your happy with your final portrait click Done, then print it out. FINISHED!
Have fun haunting your house with your new freaky family!



MONSTER MUNCH, A HALLOWEEN POPCORN MIX OF GOOD STUFF!

   This recipe comes from http://www.ourbestbites.com .  A treat for your ghosts and ghouls and easy to prepare ahead of time.




    White chocolate covered popcorn with candy corn,peanuts, and peanut butter candies. But MoNsTemUnCh sounds way more fun and Halloween-ish, right? Have you noticed that I have a popcorn mix for every season?? It’s because they’re so great. It makes a ton, pleases everyone, and involves no cooking! Can’t beat that. This one mixes sweet and salty- a combo I LOVE.
   If you’ve never bought almond bark before, you can find it in most normal grocery stores in the baking isle. It’s usually by the chocolate chips on either the very top or very bottom shelves (why? I know not). It comes in a 1lb brick, scored into squares and it melts really easily in the microwave or stove top. It tastes like white chocolate, but is much easier to work with.


Monster Munch {Halloween Popcorn Mix}
Recipe by Our Best Bites
1 package Almond Bark (1 lb)
12 C popped popcorn (about 1/2 C kernals)
1 C candy corn
1 C dry roasted, salted peanuts
1/2 C Reeces Pieces



Pop popcorn and place in a large bowl. Much larger than you think you need. The largest you have. It will make mixing easier! Pour peanuts, candy corn, and reeces pieces on top.







Take a large knife and break up almond bark. Melt according to package directions. I just chop it up a little and microwave it in intervals until smooth and melted.
Pour over popcorn mixture.







Stir until everything is well coated and then spread out onto waxed paper, parchment, or foil. Let sit until completely dry and then break up into clumps.
See? Easy :)









This makes a big batch so it’s great for packing up into cute bags and sharing!






HISTORY OF THE JACK O' LANTERN!











   Every October, carved pumpkins peer out from porches and doorsteps in the United States and other parts of the world. Gourd-like orange fruits inscribed with ghoulish faces and illuminated by candles are a sure sign of the Halloween season. The practice of decorating “jack-o’-lanterns”—the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack—originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas. Irish immigrants brought the tradition to America, home of the pumpkin, and it became an integral part of Halloween festivities.



The Legend of "Stingy Jack"


   People have been making jack-o'-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed "Stingy Jack." According to the story, Stingy Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn't want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his pocket next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. The next year, Jack again tricked the Devil into climbing into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree's bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years.















   Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, upset by the trick Jack had played on him and keeping his word not to claim his soul, would not allow Jack into hell. He sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack put the coal into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as "Jack of the Lantern," and then, simply "Jack O'Lantern."
   In Ireland and Scotland, people began to make their own versions of Jack's lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack o'lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o'-lanterns.

















   In the United States, pumpkins go hand in hand with the fall holidays of Halloween and Thanksgiving. An orange fruit harvested in October, this nutritious and versatile plant features flowers, seeds and flesh that are edible and rich in vitamins. Pumpkin is used to make soups, desserts and breads, and many Americans include pumpkin pie in their Thanksgiving meals. Carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns is a popular Halloween tradition that originated hundreds of years ago in Ireland. Back then, however, jack-o’-lanterns were made out of turnips or potatoes; it wasn’t until Irish immigrants arrived in America and discovered the pumpkin that a new Halloween ritual was born.




Pumpkin Facts


  • Pumpkins are a member of the gourd family, which includes cucumbers, honeydew melons, cantaloupe, watermelons and zucchini. These plants are native to Central America and Mexico, but now grow on six continents.

  • The largest pumpkin pie ever baked was in 2005 and weighed 2,020 pounds.                                                                            

  • Pumpkins have been grown in North America for five thousand years. They are indigenous to the western hemisphere.

  • In 1584, after French explorer Jacques Cartier explored the St. Lawrence region of North    America, he reported finding  "gros melons." The name was translated into English as "pompions," which has since evolved into the modern "pumpkin."

  • Pumpkins are low in calories, fat, and sodium and high in fiber. They are good sources of        Vitamin A, Vitamin B, potassium, protein, and iron.

  • The heaviest pumpkin weighed 1,810 lb 8 oz and was presented by Chris Stevens at the       Stillwater Harvest Fest in  Stillwater, Minnesota, in October 2010.

  • Pumpkin seeds should be planted between the last week of May and the middle of June.       They take between 90 and 120 days to grow and are picked in October when they are bright orange in color. Their seeds can be saved to grow new pumpkins the next year.