Quantcast
DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 11/15/12

Thursday, November 15, 2012

THE SHIP CALLED THE MAYFLOWER!!








   The ship 'Mayflower' has played a very significant role in the history of Thanksgiving, because it was the historic ship that took the Pilgrims to America in 1620. The pilgrims were basically the fortune hunters, bound for the resourceful 'New World'. And the 'Mayflower' was a small ship crowded with men, women and children besides the sailors on board. The first record available about the ship 'Mayflower' is somewhere in 1609. At that time it was a merchant ship, which traveled to Baltic ports, most notably Norway.
   At that time, that is around 1609, Christopher Nichols, Richard Child, Thomas Short, and Christopher Jones owned the Mayflower. The weight of this ship was about 180 tons and it rested in Harwich. Initially this ship was employed for the purpose of transportation of goods such as tar, lumber, fish and possibly some Greenland whaling. But later on this ship was employed in Mediterranean wine and spice trading.
   In 1620 Thomas Weston, John Carver and Robert Cushman hired two ships. One of them was the 'Mayflower' and the other was the 'Speedwell'. They hired these two ships in order to undertake a voyage to plant a colony in Northern Virginia. But later it was found that the Speedwell was a leaky ship. Therefore the Speedwell could not be a part of the famous voyage with the Mayflower.








   



   When the Mayflower took the Pilgrims to New England in 1620, the captain of this ship was Christopher Jones. The ship was anchored off the tip of Cape Cod on November 11, 1620. During that year winter season the Mayflower stayed in America. And the crew on this ship also suffered the harsh effects of the first winter just as the Pilgrims did, with almost half dying.
   The Mayflower started sailing for home on April 5, 1621, and it arrived back on May 6, 1621. The ship Mayflower made a few more trading runs to the places such as Spain and Ireland and finally it traded to France. However the captain of this special ship, Christopher Jones, died shortly thereafter.
   After the death of the captain the ship Mayflower lay inoperative for about next two years. And then it was appraised for probate and its value was determined to be around £128-08-04, which seems to be an extremely low value for this ship. However the fact is that had this ship been in sailing condition its value would have been around £700.
   This probate inventory is the last record of the ship 'Mayflower'. As the ship was not in very good sailing condition, it was called 'in ruins' by the High Court of Admiralty record (HCA 3/30, folio 227) written in Latin in 1624. The ships in the 'in ruins' condition were considered more valuable as wood, which was in shortage in England at the time. Therefore the Mayflower was most likely to be broken apart and sold as scrap. Though there is no evidence that the Mayflower ended up as the Jordan's barn but it is believed that it has become a tourist trap.





Stern of the Mayflower





   There were many ships, which were known by the name of 'Mayflower' because it was a very common name for the ships. And another common thing was that other ships with this name also made trips to New England, as did this historic ship - Mayflower. But what makes this 'Mayflower' different from other 'Mayflowers' is the fact that the Pilgrims used this 'Mayflower' to complete their historic journey to America.

10 TESTS FOR GUILT AT THE SALEM WITCH TRAILS!


   Rhetoric is only as potent as its source material – this is why any allusion to the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 is so effective. What comes immediately to mind is the hideous and completely unfound legal proceedings – based mostly on superstition, irrational paranoia, Puritanism-fueled mass hysteria, and deception–which resulted in 19 wrongful executions, each one hanged, burned, or drowned for some ill-fated finger-pointing. The imagery evoked is just as barbaric and painful as the means by which these accused “witches” were tried and ultimately “proven” guilty. (In actuality, most of the “afflicted” were just suffering from some mental illness medical science hadn’t quite caught up to at the time, “evil” being amongst the worst know epidemics.) Here are ten ways their verdict was ascertained:



10.
Spectral Evidence





1365356





   This type of evidence is based on claims by accusers that they would see the individual accused of witchcraft in dreams or visions doing the Devil’s bidding. The argument against this was that the Devil could take any shape, while the counter-argument was that the Devil could not inhabit an individual’s body without their permission. This form of evidence was somehow enough to convict several accused during the time it was deemed plausible. (When it was later thrown out, the conviction rate decline severely and hastened the trials’ conclusion.)



9.
Eye Witnesses Testimonials






Salemexamof





   Some witnesses would confess to actually seeing the alleged witches practicing their black magic, which was enough to tattoo guilt all over them. Of course there was nothing to stop accusers of making up stories just to see people they disliked or deemed strange taken away. Many accusations stemmed from the belief that a death or illness had been caused by witchcraft, which upon filing with a magistrate and being deemed credible would lead to an arrest. On the charge of “affliction with witchcraft” or “entering a covenant with the devil.”



8.
Witch Cake







E2C75E7C67Fe7799Da627D46A5D47Dae 1M




   In this voodoo-inspired test, the ingredients of said cake were rye meal… and urine from the girls said to be afflicted by the witch’s evil incantations. The test had dogs eat this cake, after which the alleged witch should scream out in pain – for in the process of her cursing the victims, she sent invisible particles of herself (the embodiment of pure evil, that is), which would show up in the urine. The cake, then, was effectively a voodoo doll of herself in a way. This superstition came from the Cartesian “Doctrine of Effluvia,” which logically was prescribed as a document of medical fact.



7.
Witch’s Teat

  


Witch1643






 If you’ve ever heard the expression “cold as a witch’s teat,” now you know the origin: the aforementioned teat corresponded to any kind of mole or unusual skin blemish which all witches (and frankly most humans) are characterized to have. The test was that this teat would be pricked with a needle, and if the recipient didn’t bleed or feel it, then surely there was a witch in our midst. Often times, however, needles would be purposefully blunted so it would be easier to demonstrate just how “cold and unfeeling” this teat really is.



6.
Artifacts






9Vkx2S






   Sought after in the accused home were any artifacts corresponding to witchcraft that could be used as evidence for condemnation. These included poppets (a voodoo doll of sorts through which spells could be cast), cauldrons full of ointments, and books on palm reading and horoscopes. Also having flying broomsticks, talking black cats, and pointy hats would be instant red flags (at least in the Harry Potter universe).




5.
Lord’s Prayer Test







Calligraphy01






   This was a literal test of faith. The accused would be made to recite the “Lord’s Prayer” without error – this included any stumbling, stammering, or outright spasming. As elocution is a painstaking art, it seems that any average human would slip up, but under “God’s eyes” (as well as whoever else sees themselves fit to judge) mistakes are unacceptable. As far as fits go, try forcing someone who may be mentally-retarded or hysterical (medically-speaking) or hallucinating from LSD-fungus-covered rye bread (another suspect of these ubiquitous “fits”) to read from the bible with absolute level-headedness.



4.
Touch Test







Salem Witchtrials






   This test is all about the performance. If an afflicted person – throwing fits and the like – suddenly becomes calm after the accused places their hand on him/her, then the toucher is most certainly a witch. This is said to be because all the “venom” and assorted evil toxins (stemming from the witch’s eye) that originally addled the afflicted soul have returned to their evil host.



3.
Forced Confession by Dunking







Image:Cucking Stool





Those who didn’t admit to being a witch and under heavy suspicion were usually induced to confess by way of torture. One method was dunking, in which the accused would be held under water repeatedly until they were successfully broken down. This is also an effective means to brainwash someone into believing a lie, anything to make the inhumanity cease.



2.
Pressing







Giles-Corey-500X395





Another means of torture designed to make the accuser talk, but made it impossible for them to talk, much less breathe. Called “pressing,” the subject is placed beneath heavy stones, meant to literally crush you into submission. One such recipient endured this very treatment, an 80 year-old man named Giles Corey accused of being a warlock (yes men could be accused as well). He refused to give a plea each of the several times he was asked, and was ultimately crushed to death by the stones, which, as it turned out, were more likely to speak than he was.



1.
Bound Submersion






Duck2





   There was no favorable result in this test; essentially the alleged witch would be bound at the hands and feet – with heavy rocked attached – and thrown into a body of water. If the body floated to the surface, that was proof, along some kind of whimsical lines, that the accused was indeed a witch (at which point they’d execute her by some other means). If she sank to the bottom – and inevitably drowned – she was innocent. Given that none of these girls had received any proper Navy Seals training – inhale, hold your breath, don’t panic – about 100% of them drowned, with apathetic standers-by shrugging it off, thinking ‘Oh well. Now we know.”

MILLIONAIRE BARS

   This recipe comes from julesfood.blogspot.com .  Make some this holiday season. I hope they taste as good as they look!




MILLIONAIRE BARS







ahhhh...i'm back in the kitchen! not that i was ever out of the kitchen with the holiday madness and all, but i'm back in the kitchen cooking up pretty little things that don't have to feed the masses or conform to everyone else's taste likes and dislikes. you alllll know what i mean

i hope you all had a great holiday with all kinds of sweets and savories...

now let's get on with the show !!!!..the 2010 show...new stuff, re-do stuff, same ol' stuff, but different stuff..just lots of good stuff. and don't forget the weird stuff. i'll do my best to try to find some new good weird stuff.
well, here ya go..my version of the Millionaire Cookie Bar. basically a shortbread cookie covered in caramel and then dipped in chocolate..EASY...IMPRESSIVE, kind of a candy bar but still a cookie.





.









i started with a classic Scottish Shortbread cookie i found by googling around. i prefer the dense kind rather than the flaky buttery kind for the classic. don't get me wrong i love ALL shortbread. i have quite a few through out my blogg, mostly using a Dorie Greenspan base recipe including these Maple Pecan Shortbread Bars. when i make these again i will probably try the Millionaire Bars that are created in one pan...shortbread, caramel and chocolate then cut into squares rather than individual like i have done here. just for time's sake and i'd like to use Dorie shortbread for a variation on flavor and texture.
.
BUT...i find this recipe a classic, dense Scottish Shortbread.
i have used this recipe quite a few times with a few changes in flavor and it always works well
i found it here @ ROCKRECIPIES with many thanks to, Barry, the blogger and copied below for your convenience. you'll find my notes and changes following the original.

Cream
1 cup salted butter
3/4 cup sugar
Add 2 tbsp vanilla extract
Fold in: 4 cups flour
Roll in balls and flatten or roll out and cut into shapes as desired. I like to bake the dough in large rectangles and then cut the cookies in fingers just when they come out of the oven and are still warm.(don't forget to use a parchment sling)
Bake at 350 degrees 12-15 minutes until edges are golden brown. Allow longer baking time if you are baking the large rectangles of dough to be cut in fingers.
.
my shortbread notes.....i added 1/2 tbsp. cardamon and to half the recipe i added 1/4-1/3 cup heath chips (as you can see in photo with the walnut top)
i divided the dough in half and used 2 9 x 9 pans...don't know why, but i thought i was going to make 2 totally different cookies. i ended up just cutting them different. i have made them in a 9 x 13 pan as well. i put the dough directly into the pan and start pressing down firmly....i mean i like this dough packed in tight, i don't want it flakey at all. press all the way to the edges. i put a flat surface in top, like a book and stood on it for goodness sake! then half way through the cooking i went in and lightly pressed the top with the bottom of a flat glass...
i think shortbread like this should be scored before cooking. then cut all the way through while still warm. i like to keep it in the pan through the whole process until completely cool in order to really hold it's sharp edges.
.
MILLIONAIRE COOKIE CANDY BARS...
shortbread fingers and or squares
chocolate bark
caramel squares (approx 12 oz. melted w/ 1 tbsp whipping cream)
nuts...roasted, salted or whatever you think best. i liked spiced pecans best.
melt your caramels and cream in a saucepan very slow over low/med heat. watch carefully. dip tops of shortbread and let cool completely on wax paper (i lightly sprayed the wax paper to insure non stick). i would definitely prefer homemade caramel, but these Kraft squares worked well...just not quite the flavor of real homemade.
melt your chocolate in microwave or double boiler. dip caramel shortbread in as far as you please. cool on wax paper. i just went for half...looked great and the chocolate doesn't over power the whole thing.
top with nut of choice before choc. cools ...
DONE....EASY....ENJOY....

9 HOLIDAY CHARACTERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD!



    Most American four-year-olds can tell you all about beloved Christmas characters like Santa Claus and Frosty the Snowman. But in other countries, talking about Rudolph and his ilk might earn you little more than a blank stare. Here’s a look at some holiday characters who might not be familiar to Americans, but play a big role in celebrations around the world.





1. Zwarte Piet






ZP-S




   The Dutch equivalent of Santa, Sinterklaas, rolls into town via steamship from his home in Spain, and he’s always got Zwarte Piet (“Black Pete”) in tow. Although for years Black Pete was depicted as Santa’s slave, since the 1950s he’s been toned down a bit and is now thought of as Santa’s mischievous helper—a scamp who will also put naughty children in a bag and take them back to Spain. Despite being recast as Santa’s friend or devoted, albeit non-slave, servant, Black Pete still incites quite a bit of controversy, as many Dutch people feel that a subservient character in blackface and an afro wig is more than a little racist.






2. Krampus







krampus






   This terrifying horned monster is part of the Christmas tradition in Austria and other surrounding countries. If children are good, Saint Nicholas brings them toys. If they’re bad, though, they’ve got to face Krampus’ wrath. The clawed, hairy beast is said to punish naughty children by stealing their toys, smacking them with a birch rod, and even tying them in a sack and chucking them into a river. Getting a lump of coal in your stocking doesn’t seem like such a terrible fate in comparison, does it?








3. Belsnickel
















   In northwestern Germany and in some Pennsylvania Dutch communities, children get visits from the somewhat less intimidating Belsnickel instead of Krampus. Belsnickel, a man covered in head-to-toe fur, sneaks a sock or shoe full of candy into children’s rooms. Like Krampus, though, Belsnickel will put his foot down; if the children have been naughty, they’ll wake up to a shoe full of coal or switches.







4. Le Pere Fouettard
















   Le Pere Fouettard is another of Saint Nicholas’ enforcers, this time in Eastern France. This bearded, black-robed character carries either a whip or a rod, and while St. Nick hands out toys to the good children, Le Pere Fouettard is said to beat the naughty ones. Even though he may not be as visually terrifying as Krampus, some origin stories for Le Pere Fouettard are pretty grisly. He’s said to be the murderer of three boys who’s now stuck working for St. Nick to atone for his sins.






5. Gryla






santa-helper






   Naughty children in Iceland have to fear being caught by Gryla, an ogress who lives in a mountain cave but comes out each year to plague bad kids during Christmas. During the 18th century, Gryla was such a terrifying figure—her mythology at the time included eating the bad children, not just scaring them—that a public decree banned the use of Gryla to strike terror in the hearts of the poorly behaved.






6. Ded Moroz






DM





   Ded Moroz (“Grandfather Frost”) is the Slavic equivalent of Santa Claus, but he acts just a bit differently from the St. Nick Americans are used to. Ded Moroz carries a magical staff everywhere, and instead of sneaking down chimneys to deposit gifts before disappearing into the night, he actually shows up at New Year parties to give kids their gifts
   Ded Moroz had a tough time in the Soviet Union. Between the Russian Revolution and 1937, he didn’t come at all due to a ban on Christmas-like New Year’s traditions. When Joseph Stalin came into power, he ordered that Ded Moroz wear a blue coat so that no one would confuse him with the Western Santa Claus.









7. La Befana

















   Children in Italy don’t have to worry about Santa, but they definitely want to remain on the good side of Befana. On January 6th each year, Italian kids wake up with the hope that Befana, a shawl-wearing old lady who rides a broomstick, will have come down their chimneys to leave a sock full of candy rather than a lump of coal.






8. Olentzero

















   In Basque communities, Olentzero comes to town on Christmas Eve to deliver children’s holiday gifts. Although Olentzero—an overweight man who wears a beret, smokes a pipe, and dresses like a Basque farmer—is now a beloved character who comes bearing gifts, he used to have some violent enforcer-type aspects to his personality; children heard that if they didn’t go to sleep, Olentzero would hurl a sickle down the chimney. The message was clear: go to sleep or Olentzero will come cut your throat.







9. Tio de Nadal







log



 




   Tio de Nadal is a Catalan character that’s also known as “Caga tio,” or “pooping log.” Starting with the Feast of the Immaculate Conception on December 8th, Catalan families host a tio, which is a small hollow log propped up on two legs with a smiling face painted on one end. Each night the family gives the log a few morsels of food to “eat” and a blanket so it will “stay warm” throughout the evening.   On Christmas or Christmas Eve, the family then orders the hollow log to “defecate” small gifts. Family members sing songs and hit the log with sticks in order to speed its “digestion,” and the log gradually drops candies, nuts, and dried fruits that the family shares. When a head of garlic or an onion falls out of the log, all of the treats are finished for the year.