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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 02/21/13

Thursday, February 21, 2013

CREAMY FRUIT DIP RECIPE!

  
   This recipe was found at www.simplyrealmoms.com .  Whenever you have friends or family over for a party there is usually fruit.  So why not have something that complements that luscious, sweet little bits of fruit.





IMG 6999 682x1024 Creamy Fruit Dip Recipe
I love me some fruit, but what I love more is dipping fruit into this dip! Thanks to my sisters-in-law, who made it for my wedding reception, I now have the recipe to hands-down the best fruit dip in the world. No Lie.
It’s very simple to make, and only takes three ingredients!
Creamy Fruit Dip Recipe

Ingredients
  • 1 8oz pkg Cream Cheese, softened
  • 1 7oz jar Marshmallow Cream
  • 1 cup Powdered Sugar
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients until combined.
photo1 1024x764 Creamy Fruit Dip Recipe

It’s not just great on fruit, either! This recipe makes enough for you to put on graham crackers, cookies, or top a bowl of strawberries with this instead of whipped cream!
Enjoy!

WHITE CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT FUDGE!

   This recipe comes from www.tastofhome.com . Not just chocolate but peppermint too. What two candies could you think of that would go better. The taste of white chocolate and the breath freshening power of a peppermint candy cane.


White Chocolate Peppermint FudgeWhite Chocolate Peppermint Fudge Recipe


White Chocolate Peppermint Fudge Recipe

" Make many batches of this minty fudge to give as Christmas gifts. It's not too sweet, so it appeals to lots of palates. "

This recipe is:
Quick
0


  • 81 Servings




  • Prep: 10 min. Cook: 10 min. + chilling



  • Ingredients

    • 1-1/2 teaspoons plus 1/4 cup butter, softened, divided
    • 2 cups sugar
    • 1/2 cup sour cream
    • 12 ounces white baking chocolate, chopped
    • 1 jar (7 ounces) marshmallow creme
    • 1/2 cup crushed peppermint candy
    • 1/2 teaspoon peppermint extract



    Directions

    • Line a 9-in. square pan with foil. Grease the foil with 1-1/2 teaspoons butter; set aside.
    • In a large heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, sour cream and remaining butter. Cook and stir over medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Bring to a rapid boil; cook and stir until a candy thermometer reads 234° (soft-ball stage), about 5 minutes.
    • Remove from the heat; stir in white chocolate and marshmallow creme until melted. Fold in peppermint candy and extract. Pour into prepared pan. Chill until firm.
    • Using foil, lift fudge out of pan. Gently peel off foil; cut fudge into 1-in. squares. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 2 pounds.

    Editor's Note: We recommend that you test your candy thermometer before each use by bringing water to a boil; the thermometer should read 212°. Adjust your recipe temperature up or down based on your test.






    White Chocolate Peppermint Fudge Recipe


    10 10 20

    MARDI GRAS FROM NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA!!!








         The origins of Mardi Gras can be traced back  to Medieval Europe, though we have no written record of how that really transformed into the current Mardi Gras of today.  But the origins of the Mardi Gras we celebrate today....with Kings, Mardi Gras colors, and brass bands....are traced to New Orleans.
       Although we can trace its history to the Romans, a French-Canadian expolorer, Jean Baptiste Le Moyne Sieur de Bienville, landed on a plot of ground 60 miles directly south of New Orleans in 1699 and called it "Pointe due Mardi Gras".  He also established "Fort Louis de la Louisiane" (which is now Mobile) in 1702.  In 1703, the tiny settlement of Fort Louis de la Mobile celebrated the very first Mardi Gras.










       In 1704, Mobile established a secret society (Masque de la Mobile)....similar to those who form our current Mardi Gras Krewes.  It lasted until 1709.  In 1710, the "Boef Graf Society" was formed and paraded from 1711 through 1861.  The procession was held with a huge bull's head pushed along on wheels by 16 men.  This occurred on Fat Tuesday.
       New Orleans was established in 1718 by Jean-Baptise Le Moyne.  By the 1730's, Mardi Gras was celebrated openly in New Orleans...but not in parade form.  In the early 1740's, Louisiana's Governor The Marquis de Vaudreuil, established elegant society balls...the model for the New Orleans Mardi Gras balls of today.










       The earliest reference to Mardi Gras "Carnival" appears in a 1781 report to the Spanish colonial governing body.  That year, the Perseverance Benevolent & Mutual Aid Associaiton is the first of hundreds of clubs and carnival organizations formed in New Orleans.
       By the late 1830's, New Orleans held street processions of maskers with carriages and horseback riders to celebrate Mardi Gras.  newspapers began to announce Mardi Gras events in advance.
       In 1871, Mardi Gras's second "Krewe" is formed, the Twelfth Night Reveler's, with the first account of Mardi Gras "throws".










       1872, was the year that a group of businessmen invented a King of Carnival-Rex-to parade in the first daytime parade.  They introduced the Mardi Gras colors of purple, green and gold, the Mardi Gras song, and the Mardi Gras flag.
       In 1873, the first floats were constructed entirely in New Orleans instead of France.  In 1875, Governor Warmoth of Louisiana signs the "Mardi Gras Act" making it a legal holiday in Louisiana, which it still is.
       Most Mardi Gras Krewes today developed from private social clubs that have restrictive membership policies.  Since all of these parade organizations are completely funded by its members, we call it the "Greatest Free Show on Earth"!










    History Behind the King Cake

       As part of Christian faith, the coming of the wise men bearing gifts to the Christ Child is celebrated twelve days after Christmas.  We refer to this as the Feast of Epiphany or Little Christmas on the Twelfth Night.  This is a time of celebration, exchanging gifts and feasting.  Today, the tradition continues as people all over the world gather for festive Twelfth Night celebrations.  A popular custom was and still is the baking of a special cake in honor of the three kinds called "A King's Cake".
        Inside every cake is a tiny baby (generally plastic now, but sometimes this baby might be made of porcelain or even gold).  The tradition of having King Cake Parties has evolved through time, and the person who receives the slice of cake with the baby is asked to continue the festivities by hosting the next King Cake party.



























       Originally, King Cakes were a simple ring of dough with a small amount of decoration.  Today's King Cakes are much more festive.  After the rich Danish dough is braided and baked, the "baby" is inserted.  The top of the ring or oval cake is then covered with delicious sugar toppings in the traditional Mardi Gras colors of purple, green and gold.
       In more recent years, some bakeries have been creative with stuffing and topping their cakes with different flavors of cream cheese and fruit fillings.












       January 6th, the Twelfth Night after Christmas, is also the day Mardi Gras season begins.  Mardi Gras Day is always 47 days prior to Easter Sunday (Fat Tuesday is always the day before Ash Wednesday).
       So, in Louisiana, especially, Mardi Gras season and King Cakes go hand in hand with literally hundreds of thousands of King Cakes consumed at parties and office lunch rooms every year.
       Ordering King Cakes over the Internet has now become an annual tradition by consumers all around the world...and many of the bakers offer them year around.  After all, you can't have a Mardi Gras party without a King Cake.