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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 06/05/13

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

PULILAN CARABAO FESTIVAL FROM THE PHILLIPINES!!





The History

    5000 years ago, people don’t have surnames, they are only identified through their occupation. Labrador (meaning laborer) identifies those who perform hard work in the fields. San Isidro is one of them, a tenant of a certain land. Despite his tardiness he always finishes his tasks for that day. His landlord wondered how the laborer finished his work despite being late, so one time he went to the field to see for himself how San Isidro does his job. Upon arriving at the field he saw an angel plowing the field. In shock and awe the landlord knelt, a scene immortalized in various images of San Isidro Labrador.







The Festival

    Pulilan Carabao Festival was created in honor of the carabao, the farmer’s companion in the fields and his helping hand during plantation and harvest, but the main reason on why it was created is to honor their patron saint, San Isidro de Labrador.
    Before the festival, the populace will have Novena for 9 days and for 24 days they will have a procession of the patron saint around different towns of Bulacan. After the said activities the festivities then commence.







The Scoop

    The day before the festival four drum and lyre bands with majorette dancers line up in front of the parish and perform their own set of moves and musical tunes as the crowd watches.
    At the day of the festival (May 14) the streets are flocked with carabaos, dancers, musicians, and floats resembling the farmer’s beast of burden. Dancers are adorned with colorful costumes and dance in fluid motion.





    What makes the festival memorable is the carabaos that kneel whenever they pass by the church, some of them walk while on their knees, a sign of homage to San Isidro de Labrador, the laborer who always finishes his job even when he arrives late.

HAUNTED ROADS: A SAMPLING OF SOME OF AMERICA'S GHOSTLY HIGHWAYS!!



    Most ghostly experiences along roadways happen at night. The ghosts that are reportedly seen along these roadways vary from subtle wisps to full-fledged, seemingly corporeal bodies that get into the car and carry on conversations.
    Many road-ghosts just walk down the road where they were killed, or appear alongside a driver hoping to catch a ride back to their home. Sometimes ghosts move alongside a car as it speeds down the highways and still others appear abruptly in front of the vehicle, nearly causing an accident.






    Haunted highways are not only occupied by ghosts, but also phantom cars. Sometimes, these phantom cars appear in the rear view mirror as two headlights (that quickly disappear), other times, a vehicle will allow a car to pass only to discover there is no car behind them after all.
    This type of paranormal activity as legend throughout the world, but to experience it is a rare occurrence.
    Here are details, about some roads, throughout America, that have legends attached and ones where witnesses have claimed to have seen ghostly activity.






   Clinton Road in West Milford, New Jersey: A ten-mile curvy stretch of road that meanders through woods and has a distinct air of isolation. Legend has it a little boy was playing on this road on a bridge above a waterway and fell to his death. They say if you throw a quarter into the water, it will be thrown back at you. There are also tales of being followed by unseen beings, the overwhelming feeling of being watched, and a red-eyed hound from Hell chasing people out from the foliage.






    Shades of Death Road in Warren County in New Jersey: Yes, it really is called "Shades of Death" Road. The locals gave it that name because numerous murders, accidents and strange happenings have occurred on this roadway. It is said that people have been killed by wildcats roaming the area. Discarded, mutilated corpses have been found along this road. The road itself is full of twists and turns and is shaded by numerous trees, lending to its spooky air. The spirits of the Lenni-Lenape people are believed to haunt this road, having been viciously attacked by a tribe of Iroquois Indians.






   Split Rock Road in Hibernia New Jersey: There are numerous legends surrounding this stretch of road. One such urban legend goes: if you drive down this road late at night, people (who these people are depends on who you're talking to locally), they might be Satanists/Albinos/Gangs, will block each end of the one-lane bridge and trap you in the middle as you drive across it. There have been murders and suicides on this road. Animal carcasses have been found as well as unexplained lights in the sky.







    State Road 15 North in Bristol, Indiana: Legend has it if you drive north on State Road 15, past the toll road you will come across a house on the left, directly before the state line. Stop and study this house. Eventually, if you sit there long enough, the spirit of the owner of the house parts the curtains and waves at you.







    HWY 20 in Brushy Prairie, Indiana: Most active around the holidays, there exists an urban legend of a Lady in White. She wears a wedding dress and when people try to pick her up, she disappears. This supposedly happens between the midnight and 5am hours.





    Highway 12 West in Fredrica, Delaware: The legend - A man, quite angry with his landlord, murdered the landlord then ground him up with cornmeal. He then fed it to his dog. It is said that the phantom dog with its red, glowing eyes can be seen by drivers at night along the side of the road.






     Salem Church Road in Newark, Delaware: In the 1900's, a family of six was hung due to accusations of witchcraft. This family has been seen, all six of them, walking along this highway, in search, people say, of the relatives who hung them. (Don't think I'd want to be them!)





    Mona Lisa Drive in New Orleans, Louisiana: The statue of a philanthropist's daughter, Mona, has been erected in City Park but destroyed by careless teenagers. Witnesses claim to have seen a very sad Mona as they drive along this road. She floats silently next to the car, scratching the glass forlornly, then just as quickly, she vaporizes.

    Remember, if you drive down any road expecting to see ghostly spectacles, be respectful of those living there, as well as any other traffic on the road! I would love to hear from anyone who has had a first-hand paranormal experience on any of these, or other roads.

THE CALAVERAS COUNTY FROG JUMP FROM CALIFORNIA!

The book that started it all





    "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" is an 1865 short story by Mark Twain, his first great success as a writer, bringing him national attention. The story has also been published as "Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog" (its original title) and "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County". In it, the narrator retells a story he heard from a bartender, Simon Wheeler, at the Angels Hotel in Angels CampCalifornia, about the gambler Jim Smiley. Twain describes him: "If he even seen a straddle bug start to go anywheres, he would bet you how long it would take him to get to—to wherever he going to, and if you took him up, he would foller that straddle bug to Mexico but what he would find out where he was bound for and how long he was on the road."




Samuel Clemons aka "Mark Twain"


    "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" is also the title story of an 1867 collection of short stories by Mark Twain. Twain's first book, it collected 27 stories that were previously published in magazines and newspapers.
    Twain first wrote the title short story at the request of his friend Artemus Ward, for inclusion in an upcoming book. Twain worked on two versions but neither was satisfactory to him—neither got around to describing the jumping frog contest. Ward pressed him again, but by the time Twain devised a version he was willing to submit, that book was already nearing publication, so Ward sent it instead to The Saturday Press, where it appeared in the November 18, 1865 edition as "Jim Smiley and His





   Jumping Frog". Twain's colorful story was immensely popular, and was soon printed in many different magazines and newspapers. Twain developed the idea further, and Bret Harte published this version in The Californian on December 16; this time entitled "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County", and the man named Smiley was changed to Greeley.







About the Frog Jump and Its History

    In 1928, the Angels Camp Boosters Club (which is still very active in promoting fun events in Calaveras County) organized a celebration in honor of the first paving of Main Street in Angels Camp and chose to use Mark Twain’s famous story as the focus for their event. The first Calaveras Jumping Frog Jubilee drew over 15,000 people to Angels Camp. Visitors came from all over the countryside on foot, in wagons, and on horseback.Today, thousands of frog jump contestants from all over the world give the Celebrated Calaveras Frog Jump unique international acclaim. Plan to attend the






   Calaveras County Fair and Jumping Frog Jubilee is held annually, the third week in May at “Frogtown”. Breathtaking rodeos, live concerts, exhilarating midway rides, country crafts, professional and amateur art and exhibits, lots of food, a beautiful setting, and much more make this a fun weekend for the entire family. For more information, take a look at the official frog jump site at www.frogtown.org