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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 06/20/13

Thursday, June 20, 2013

IT'S TIME FOR A HELPING OF CANDY FACTS!!! YYYUUUUMMMMM!!








    Candy Corn was invented in the 1880s by George Rennigner.
    The oldest company to produce the surgary corn is The Goelitz Company which is now known as the Jelly Belly Company. They have used the same recipe for over 100 years. Can't get enough of this Halloween classic? At the moment, you can buy 10 pound for $81 dollars. Approximately 9 billion pieces of it will be made each year.







   Tootsie Rolls were invented in 1896 by Leo Hirshfield. The product is named after Hirschfield's daughter whose nickname was "Tootsie". In 1896 Tootsie Roll cost one cent. In fact, it was the first "individually wrapped penny candy". Over 100 years later, consumers can still find Tootsie Rolls for a penny. The Tootsie Company makes 64 million Tootsie Rolls a day.








    A fun online Chicago Tribune article suggested that if your favorite Halloween treat is Snickers, it means you probably have an indecisive personality. "Do you want chocolate? Do you want nuts? You don't know. Or do you?" Snickers is the most popular chocolate bar in the entire world. Snickers got its name from a horse. There are around sixteen peanuts in each Snickers bar. They are made by The Mars Company.







    Hershey's produces around 30 different chocolate products that can be given out to trick or treaters on Halloween. Most people probably know that Hershey's Chocolates are made in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The town got its name from the chocolate and its inventor Milton Hershey. But did you know that before it was named Hershey, the town was known as Derry Church? Here is a link to The Hershey Company.
    Think chocolate is boring? Archie Mcphee sells fun Halloween themed products such as gummy maggots, brain flavored zombie mints, and voodoo pop.
According to AOL, the average American household spends $45 dollars on Halloween food and candy. Candied apples are a popular Halloween treat, but their origin remains unknown. Dan Walker is sometimes credited with the invention of the caramel apple, but others believe he was only involved in marketing caramel apples while working at Kraft Foods in the 1950s.

DIY AIR DRYED PORCELAIN TYPE CLAY!

  This diy comes from www.thejunkwave.com .  Another alternative than going out and buying some. Cheaper to make and use than buying your own.  Especially if you love to do arts and craft. This stuff comes in hand in making different holiday gifts and decorations.  Now go make something!


How to make your own air dried porcelain with common household ingredients

Anything that is quick, affordable and makes beautiful things is a craft winner for me. But…I often find myself uninspired for something new and different.





I’ve found it in air dried porcelain (aka Porcelana Fria).
What will someone make with
  • 3 cups of white glue (PVA)
  • 3 cups of cornstarch (Corn flour)
  • one tablespoon of white vinegar
  • one tablespoon of glycerin (health food or hobby shop), and
  • 2 tablespoons of canola oil?




The beautiful mouse and necklace pictured (compliments of Espirit) is the answer! There’s more fantastic ideas on the site of the woman who’s recipe I have used: Libreria Andrea
Amazingly simple and a GREAT school holiday project, get the kids into the kitchen to cook up some home made, air dried, porcelain.

Let’s make it:



cold porcelain recipe


In a mixing bowl (or non-stick pan) mix 3 cups of white glue and 3 cups of cornstarch. Add one tablespoon of white vinegar, one tablespoon of glycerin, 2 tablespoons of canola oil. Blend thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Heat in a microwave oven or in a saucepan on the stove.
For microwave heating: Cook in a microwave-compatible recipient for 2 to 3 minutes on high (for a 800W oven; longer for a less powerful oven). Stop every 30 seconds to mix. During the last 30 seconds, stop every 10 seconds to check the consistency of the mixture. As soon as the dough becomes thick and lumpy (like ricotta cheese), remove from the oven.
Stove top: Cook in a saucepan over low heat for about 15 minutes. Stir with a wooden spoon. As soon as the dough becomes thick and lumpy (like ricotta cheese) and starts to pull away from the side of the pan, remove from heat.
Cooking is the only tricky step to making cold porcelain. You need to cook just long enough to thicken the dough but not too long, otherwise it will be too hard and impossible to work with.
Coat your working surface and your hands with cold cream or hand cream. Knead the dough until it has cooled. It can be quite hot to begin with, so take care. The dough is sticky and lumpy at first, but as you knead it, it becomes smooth and supple. Make a large ball and store it in an airtight container for 24 hours before using it.
This one’s a big thumbs up from me. I can feel some air dried porcelain Christmas decorations coming up.

THE EPSOM DERBY FROM ENGLAND!




    The Derby Stakes, known as The Investec Derby or The Derby and internationally as the Epsom Derby, is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain which is open to three-year-old Thoroughbred colts and fillies. It is run at Epsom Downs over a distance of 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 10 yards (2,423 metres), and it is scheduled to take place each year in early June. It is Britain's richest horse race, and the most prestigious of the country's five Classics. It is sometimes referred to as the Blue Riband of the turf.
    The Epsom Derby is one of the most prestigious and iconic events of the sporting and social calendars. The Ladies day is known for being a highly fashionable event, where ladies compete to win the coveted Style on the Downs competition. Elaborate headwear and colourful dresses are the norm.






History

    The Derby originated at a celebration following the first running of the Oaks Stakes in 1779. A new race was planned, and it was decided that it should be named after either the host of the party, the 12th Earl of Derby, or one of his guests, Sir Charles Bunbury. According to legend the decision was made by the toss of a coin, but it is probable that Bunbury, the Steward of the Jockey Club, deferred to his host. The inaugural running of the Derby was held on 4 May 1780. It was won by Diomed, a colt owned by Sir Charles Bunbury, who collected prize money of £1,065 15s. The first four runnings were contested over 1 mile, but this was amended to the current distance of 1½ miles in 1784. Lord Derby achieved his first success in the event in 1787, with a horse called Sir Peter Teazle.






    The starting point of the race was moved twice during the 19th century. The first move, suggested by Lord George Bentinck, was in 1848, and the second was in 1872. It was discovered in 1991 that the exact length of the race was 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 10 yards.
    The Derby has inspired many similar events around the world. National variations include the Prix du Jockey Club, the Irish Derby, the Deutsches Derby, the Derby Italiano and in Australia, the AJC Australian Derby, Queensland Derby, South Australian Derby, the VRC Victoria Derby and WATC Derby. The New Zealand Derby contested at Ellerslie Racecourse, Auckland is the richest Derby in the Southern Hemisphere. Several races in the United States bear the "Derby" name, the most famous of which is the Kentucky Derby









Records

  • Fastest winning time (at Epsom) – 2m 31.33s, Workforce (2010)
  • Widest winning margin – 10 lengths, Shergar (1981)
  • Longest odds winners – Jeddah (1898), Signorinetta (1908), Aboyeur (1913), 100/1
  • Shortest odds winner – Ladas (1894), 2/9

Epsom Derby, 1927



  • Most runners – 34 (1862)
  • Fewest runners – 4 (1794
Timeline


  • 1838 Derby winner1805 – One of the horses was brought down by a spectator.
  • 1825 – Middleton didn't start before or after winning the Derby.
  • 1838 – Amato never raced before or after winning the Derby.
  • 1844 – The original winner Running Rein was disqualified as he was actually an ineligible four-year-old horse named Maccabeus.
  • 1881 – Iroquois became the first American-bred to win a leg of the British triple crown.






  • 1884 – The race finished with a dead-heat between Harvester and St. Gatien.
  • 1887 – Merry Hampton is the most recent horse to win the Derby with no previous victories.
  • 1894 – The winner was owned by the Prime Minister at the time, the 5th Earl of Rosebery.
  • 1901 – The first year in which a mechanical starting gate was used.
  • 1909 – Minoru was the first Derby winner owned by a reigning monarch, King Edward VII, who had previously won twice as Prince of Wales.
  • 1913 – The 6/4 favourite Craganour, owned by Charles B. Ismay, brother of J. Bruce Ismay of the Titanic, was controversially disqualified, and the race was awarded to the 100/1 outsider Aboyeur. Suffragette Emily Davison is struck by King George V's horse, Anmer, she dies three days later.
  • 1916 – Fifinella, who also won the Oaks, is the most recent of six fillies to win the race. The previous five were Eleanor (1801), Blink Bonny (1857), Shotover (1882), Signorinetta (1908), Tagalie (1912).


Persimmon, Derby winner in 1896


  • 1921 – The winner Humorist died two weeks after the race.
  • 1927 – The first Derby to be broadcast by the BBC.
  • 1932 – April the Fifth is the most recent winner trained at Epsom.
  • 1946 – Airborne is the most recent of 4 grey horses to win the Derby.
  • 1953 – Pinza was the first winner in the race for the jockey Sir Gordon Richards, after 27 unsuccessful attempts.
  • 1960 - Although there had been an experimental TV transmission of the race in the early 1930s, regular television coverage of the Derby began this year, initially on both BBC and ITV.
  • 1989 – The runner-up Terimon is the longest-priced horse to finish placed in the Derby, at odds of 500/1.
  • 1996 – Alex Greaves became the first (and so far only) lady jockey to ride in the race. She finished last on the filly Portuguese Lil.




  • 1998 – The most recent filly to take part, the 1,000 Guineas winner Cape Verdi, started as 11/4 favourite but could only finish 9th.
  • 2006 – Martin Dwyer's winning ride on Sir Percy subsequently won the Lester Award for "Flat Ride of the Year".
  • 2007 – Authorized provided jockey Frankie Dettori with his first winner in the Derby after 14 previous attempts.
  • 2008 – Jim Bolger, the trainer of the winner New Approach, had left the horse entered for the race "by mistake", having not initially intended to run.