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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 07/05/13

Friday, July 5, 2013

DIY, GIVING METAL AND COPPER THAT OLD PATINA LOOK!!

Patina fun................

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I have been experimenting the last couple days.  The gold heart was shiny gold yesterday, and today it looks like this.
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Now here is what you need to have and the directions:
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If you have this magazine you will find this article and all you need to know about changing those shiny gold charms to a beautiful verdigris color.
Tips:
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I wanted fast results so I dipped mine in the solution and let it set for 30 minutes and then took it out to dry and then did it several more times that same day.  And it happened quicker than I thought.
Have fun if you have all the elements to experiment.

WORLD EGGTHROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS FROM ENGLAND!





   The World Egg Throwing Federation is based at Swaton, in the county of Lincolnshire, England. This ancient village has stood on this ground since before Roman times. The occupying army created a canal that ran from Lincoln to Cambridge which was fed by, and crossed, by the River Eau at Swaton. Much of the canal is still extant today. The village is mentioned in the Dooms Day book of 1068 as possessing a moated site. It’s known that this small village had a market, its own gibbet and the Church is considered to be one of the finest in England. The first female Sherriff of Nottingham is buried here.
   The organised sport of Egg Throwing is thought to date back to at least 1322 when the newly appointed Abbot took possession of the Parish of Swaton by royal decree. It is said that he was the only person to own chickens and ensured the attendance at church of his peasant by providing them alms of one egg for each attendee. However, when the River Eau flooded, preventing people getting to church, the monks would hurl the eggs over to the waiting peasants. It’s also said that when the flood was even wider that they used small trebuchets to get that extra distance required. It is from these humble beginnings that the sport of egg throwing started and has been played ever since in the village.






   The World Egg Throwing Federation was set up in 2004 in order to regulate Egg Throwing as a number of variations of the sport have come into existence, including nefarious use of eggs in political demonstrations. From its formation the Federation has been joined by local and national groups that practice the sport, and now acts as a central body, offering advice, ideas and as organiser of the annual world championships. Its aims and policies have been adopted by many as the sport continues to grow in popularity and in doing so the Federation raises thousands of pounds for local, nationals and international charities.

Disciplines
   Sport egg throwing comprises of the following disciplines;-Egg Throwing.
-Egg Static Relay.
-Egg Target Throwing
-Russian Egg Roulette
-Egg Trebuchet Challenge


Egg Throwing   This comprises of a two-person team, the winner is the team who can throw and catch an egg over the greatest distance. The team start off 10 metres apart. After each throw each member will move further apart. The team members alternate their throwing and catching roles after each throw.
    A successful toss allows progression onto the next round and is adjudged when the egg is moved between players without breakage or touching the ground.
    A catcher may not move from his start position until the egg to be caught is in the air en route to that catcher.
    Where more than 1 team is successful the players move backwards to a designated spot and repeat with the roles reversed until a winner is identified.
    Where more than 1 team is successful the distance is extended.
    Where no team completes a successful toss at a distance then the throw is repeated, on a knock out basis until a team, or teams achieves success.
    The team that manages a successful toss of the greatest distance is judged to be the winner.
   There are two events; all comers and "under 13"





Egg Static Relay
     A team consists of 11 players.
    Each player stands at a predetermined mark along a route 100 metres long.
    Players may not move more than 5 metres from their mark.
    Upon the start signal a packet of 12 eggs is passed, egg-by-egg, from player to player until the final team member has collected successfully all 12 eggs.
    Eggs must travel individually.
    Where a breakage occurs a 3 second penalty is added to the time.
    The competition is held in heats with a play off to decide the championship title.

Egg Target Throwing
    A selected (volunteer) target is placed 24 feet forward from the throw line in front of a safety net to prevent overthrow.
    The thrower is provided with 4 eggs
    The thrower must warn the target that he a throw is about to commence and receive acknowledgement before each throw.
    Eggs are hurled at the target.
    Points are awarded for strikes on specific areas.
    Eggs that do not break upon impact with the target or rear safety net may be re-thrown.
    If an egg falls outside the safety net area or throw line the thrower is disqualified.

Russian Egg Roulette
    Individual challenge against an opponent on a knock out basis
Players sit opposite each other, across a table.
    Each player wears a provided head bandana for protection. In appropriate bandanas may not be worn.
    The toss winner decides whether to go first or second.
    A tray containing 6 specially selected eggs will be proffered. 5 hard-boiled, 1 raw.
    Each player takes it in turn to select one and then smash the egg onto his or her own fore head until one-player finds the raw one.
   The finder of the raw egg loses the game or match.
   Inspired by one Montegue Blister of Strange Games







Egg Trebuchet   A team of (at least) 2 players construct a gravity powered machine based upon the ancient trebuchet design. The base of the legs is restricted to 2 square metres (outriggers may protrude beyond this).  The power source must be contained within a 9 litre container. Team member 1 targets a set distance. Team player number 2 becomes the target and positions self at that set distance. When the trebuchet releases the egg projectile team player number 2 may move from his start point. Points are awarded for striking the target. Additional points are received is the target catches the projectile unbroken. 3 eggs are provided for each distance. In the event of a tie a different distance is set until a winner is identified. PPE will be worn.


WETF Egg Throwing Rules
All competitors must be aware of the following generic rules:1. Team members will be provided with protective clothing that must be worn when taking part in the competition. Eye protection goggles will be available.

2. Eye injuries are possible if struck by an egg. Players must be aware of the potential for harm. Eggs thrown in a reckless manner towards unprepared players or others may result in disqualification.

3. In order to reduce the risk of infection from of avian flu or subsequent shortage, all eggs will be stockpiled during the preceding 6 months to guarantee that they are free from any virus.

4. All eggs will come from organically fed, free range, sustainable and happy sources.







            5. The organiser will supply all eggs used. They will be marked for security purposes and required to be broken by the heat or final winner, to prove that they have not been switched or tampered with, at the conclusion of each heat or final.

6. Players are not permitted to use any physical, hand held or worn aid when catching or throwing eggs. Aids include any kind of glove, net, propelling instrument (mechanical or otherwise), stick or any other object that gives and unfair advantage to the team.

   As a responsible sporting governing body, we have banned the use of performance enhancing drugs, including doping agents. Any competitor may be subject to drug testing, people may be chosen at random, or targeted in the case of any allegations. We reserve the right to give any competitor a drug test, and in case   of refusal, the competitor may be disqualified. Swaton Micro Brewery “Happy Jack” real ale is a permitted and indeed recommended, substance.







All competitors must be aware of the following generic rules:1. Team members will be provided with protective clothing that must be worn when taking part in the competition. Eye protection goggles will be available.

2. Eye injuries are possible if struck by an egg. Players must be aware of the potential for harm. Eggs thrown in a reckless manner towards unprepared players or others may result in disqualification.

3. In order to reduce the risk of infection from of avian flu or subsequent shortage, all eggs will be stockpiled during the preceding 6 months to guarantee that they are free from any virus.

4. All eggs will come from organically fed, free range, sustainable and happy sources.

5. The organiser will supply all eggs used. They will be marked for security purposes and required to be broken by the heat or final winner, to prove that they have not been switched or tampered with, at the conclusion of each heat or final.

6. Players are not permitted to use any physical, hand held or worn aid when catching or throwing eggs. Aids include any kind of glove, net, propelling instrument (mechanical or otherwise), stick or any other object that gives and unfair advantage to the team.

   As a responsible sporting governing body, we have banned the use of performance enhancing drugs, including doping agents. Any competitor may be subject to drug testing, people may be chosen at random, or targeted in the case of any allegations. We reserve the right to give any competitor a drug test, and in case   of refusal, the competitor may be disqualified. Swaton Micro Brewery “Happy Jack” real ale is a permitted and indeed recommended, substance.



TWINKIE BUNDT CAKE!!

Twinkie Bundt Cake via Sweetapolita




So, it turns out I’ve never had a Twinkie. How is this possible? Well, I am Canadian after all but that’s still no excuse. With the latest buzz about the Hostess trouble and potential Twinkieproduction coming to a halt in the U.S., I suppose we Canadians should be excited about the fact that they will continue to be manufactured and distributed here, from what I’ve read. (Isn’t it ironic?) So even though they are available in Canada, I still think of them as an all-American snack.
But really, to have one might just be to say I’ve had one. The truth is I think I’d take homemade Twinkie-ness over the store-bought variety, any day. What I do have fond memories of, however, are Canada’s answer to the Twinkie: Vachon’s 1/2 Moon Cakes (and incidentally, this is the same company who manufactures Twinkies here in Canada). My mom used to buy 1/2 Moons for me, along with a few other Canadian gems, such as Jos Louis cakes (red velvet cakes sandwiching vanilla cream filling and dipped in milk chocolate) and Passion Flakies (flaky pastry filled with cream and fruit filling). There was something about the vanilla-vanilla 1/2 Moons, though, that had my heart. And Twinkie or 1/2 Moons–no matter what you call these treats, the appeal is the same: moist golden vanilla cake sandwiching sweet white vanilla filling. Essentially what childhood dreams are made of. But still, the thought of all of those chemicals and preservatives make me shudder . . .







So when I excitedly opened Shauna Sever’s latest book, Pure Vanilla: Irresistible Recipes and Essential Techniques, and saw her recipe for Twinkie Bundt Cake, I knew that everything was going to be alright with the world again. And if that wasn’t enough, her book boasts countless vanilla recipes supreme, along with a ton of history about and techniques for working with this beloved bean. When it was time to choose a recipe from her book to share with you, I was completely perplexed because I was intrigued by each and every one of them.
In the first week I had the book I made her Big, Soft Frosted Vanilla CookiesHoney-Vanilla Granola ClustersHeirloom Vanilla Sugar Cookies and Lemon-Vanilla Dream Bars. I literally couldn’t stop. They were all incredible and the recipes were, in true Shauna style, all winners. (And let us not forget the delightful Vanilla Bean Marshmallows I made from her first book when I blogged about my Homemade Puffy Cloud S’mores.) Then when I made this Twinkie Bundt Cake, I truly couldn’t wait to share it with you.



Twinkie Bundt Cake via Sweetapolita




So what exactly is a Twinkie Bundt Cake? It’s a from-scratch, moist, golden, super-vanilla, cream-filled cake–essentially one big homemade Twinkie. While the flavours are classic, the hit of marshmallow creme in the filling bumps the sweetness of this cake just enough to make it a complete throwback to childhood. What I found most surprising about this cake was that it was so easy to make and fill, it stayed gloriously moist for days, and had so much true vanilla flavour. Shauna pulled the Twinkie-factor off in a big, huge, vanilla parade kind of way.
So here is the recipe just as it is in the book, Pure Vanilla: Irresistible Recipes and Essential Techniques, with my addition of ingredient weights whenever possible:
Twinkie Bundt Cake
Yield: Serves 10

Ingredients
    For the Cake:

  • 3 cups (345 g) cake flour
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon (6 g) salt
  • 6 tablespoons (90 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) pure vanilla extract
  • 2 cups (400 g) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (118 ml) vegetable oil
  • 3 large eggs plus 4 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (237 ml) buttermilk, at room temperature
  • For the Filling:

  • 1 (7.5 ounce) jar marshmallow creme
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick)(114 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) pure vanilla extract
  • Confectioners' sugar, for dusting (optional)

Instructions
    For the Cake:

  1. Position rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat overn to 325°F. Coat a 12-cup Bundt pan with nonstick cooking spray and dust it lightly with flour.
  2. Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt into a large bowl.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter and vanilla extract on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add sugar and beat until evenly mixed, about 1 minute. Slowly pour in oil. Beat until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add eggs and egg yolks, 1 at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition.
  4. Reduce mixer speed to low. Stir in flour mixture and buttermilk in three alternating additions, ending with the buttermilk, and continue to mix on low speed until the batter is smooth and no lumps remain. Turn off mixer and fold batter several times by hand to ensure everything is well incorporated, and then pour into prepared pan.
  5. Bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until the cake is golden, the top springs back when lightly pressed, and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Place pan on a wire rack and let cool completely, about 2 hours.
  6. For the Filling:

  7. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together marshmallow creme and butter until smooth. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a large round tip.
  8. With the cake still in the pan, use a paring knife or apple corer to cut 6 or 7 deep holes into the bottom of the cake, each about 3/4 inch in diameter; be careful not to cut through top of cake. Discard (i.e., nibble) cake scraps. With your fingers, gently burrow a horizontal tunnel around the center of the cake, connecting the vertical holes.
  9. Insert the tip of the pastry bag into each hold and squeeze in filling, tilting pastry bag back and forth as you work to encourage filling into the horizontal tunnel through the cake. When cake is filled, use a spatula to scrape away excess filling from the bottom of the cake. Quickly and carefully invert cake onto serving platter. Dust with confectioners' sugar, if desired, and serve.