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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 09/07/13

Saturday, September 7, 2013

SEPTEMBER UNUSUAL HOLIDAYS AND OBSERVANCES!













September 1: Chicken Boy's Day - Buy a chicken suit and wear it all day to commemorate Chicken Boy.

September 2: V-J Day - V-J...Is that like PJ day? Oh, no - I guess it stands for Victory in Japan.

September 3: National Lazy Moms Day (2010) - Are you a lazy mom? Then this day is for you!

September 4: Give the dog a break and carry in your own newspaper for once.





September 5: Be Late for Something Day - This gives you a sound excuse to be late for something.

September 6: Labor Day - Go to work and labor...oh, wait - most people have the day off from work. Never mind.

September 7: Google Day - Google yourself.

September 8: International Literacy Day - This is good news if you don't know how to read; today you will learn how.

September 9: Wonderful Weirdoes Day - For all those wonderful weirdoes out there.






September 10: Swap Ideas Day - Got an idea? Swap with someone!

September 11: Remembrance Day - Be extra careful not to forget anything.

September 12: Video Games Day - Oh, great, now the guys have an excuse to play video games all day...

September 13: International Chocolate Day - Gee, seems like there is a day dedicated to chocolate at least once a month! Must be popular.

September 14: Wild Card - Create your own holiday today.






September 15: Felt Hat Day - Buy felt in your favorite color and make yourself a funky hat to wear.

September 16: Step-Family Day - If you don't have a step-family, create one for the day.

September 17: Citizenship Day - Be a good citizen. Maybe you'll win an award.

September 18: National Respect Day - Hopefully, some of us will learn what the word means.

September 19: Talk Like a Pirate Day - Oy, matey! Yes, I'm talking to you.






September 20: National Women Road Warrior Day (2010) - If you are a woman, sign up to become a warrior.

September 21: International Day of Peace - I hope you can have a peaceful day.

September 22: Dear Diary Day - Start each sentence you say with, "Dear Diary."

September 23: Earth Overshoot Day - This means we have used up all our resources for the year; guess you'll have to do without until January 1st.

September 24: Punctuation Day - Make sure to punctuate every sentence you speak.




September 25: National One-Hit Wonder Day - To take the words right out of Holidaypedia's mouth, "Give a little boogie love to all those artists who hit it big once and then faded into oblivion."

September 26: Johnny Appleseed Day - Plant an apple tree in honor of Johnny Appleseed.

September 27: Ancestor Appreciation Day - Make a family tree and list all your ancestors up until 20 generations ago. You thought it was gonna be easy, didn't you?

September 28: World Maritime Day - Research and write a paper on the importance of shipping safety, maritime security and the marine environment for World Maritime Day.

September 29: National Attend Your Grandchild's Birth Day - Since we all have grandchildren being born today.







September 30: Shemini Atzeret Day - Tell me what Shemini Atzeret Day is. In just one word.

NATIONAL FOOD HOLIDAYS IN SEPTEMBER!






    Each day in America is a national food holiday and what better way to celebrate by enjoying those foods. Now, you don't have to wait for Thanksgiving or Christmas to enjoy a delicious food filled holiday. In this article you will find a list of national food holidays for the month of September. Along with each day, you'll also find a delicious idea on how to celebrate that particular holiday.






National Cherry Popover Day September 1: If you aren't sure how to make cherry popovers, just skip the popover part and make muffins with dried cherries and chocolate chips.

National Blueberry Popsicle Day September 2: Blueberry popsicles can be so easy to make. Just combine fresh blueberries with vanilla yogurt and a splash of your favorite juice. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze until set.

National Welsh Rarebit Day September 3: Welsh Rarebit is basically a cheese sauce poured over buttered toast. You can find many recipes online that are made using canned soups. But, you can also find authentic recipes as well.

National Macadamia Nut Day September 4: This holiday is so easy to celebrate. Just buy some chocolate covered macadamia nuts. Or, you could also prepare white chocolate chip and macadamia nut cookies.






National Cheese Pizza Day September 5: Take it easy on this food holiday and just order a cheese pizza from your favorite pizza restaurant.

National Coffee Ice Cream Day September 6: Coffee ice cream is so delicious and there are so many different companies that make it. But, on this food holiday, I highly recommend the Ben & Jerry's brand. Why not take things a bit further and make a coffee ice cream pie or cake?

National Acorn Squash Day September 7: Acorn squash is a wonderful fall dish. All you need to do is roast the squash until tender and then top with a mixture of brown sugar, butter, and toasted pecans. Top off this food holiday with turkey cutlets and homemade cranberry sauce.

National Date Nut Bread Day September 8: Date nut bread is so delicious and can easily be found in your grocery store. But, if you want to make this food holiday extra special, make a cream cheese frosting to top off the bread.

Weinerschnitzel Day September 9: Weinerschnitzel is a lovely dish of fried veal chops. Of course, you don't have to fry veal. Pork chops can easily be substituted. Top off this delicious food holiday meal with a simple squeeze of lemon juice, which helps to cut the grease.






TV Dinner Day September 10: This is obviously an easy food holiday to celebrate. Just prepare your favorite brand of TV dinner and kick back with your favorite TV show.

National Hot Cross Bun Day September 11: Hot Cross Buns can easily be prepared at home, especially if you have a bread maker. But, you can also find this delicious treat in many bakeries if you don't have time to make them from scratch.

National Chocolate Milkshake Day September 12: Chocolate milkshakes are so fun and easy to make at home. Just take a high quality chocolate ice cream and allow it to soften on your counter. Once the ice cream has softened pour a splash of chocolate milk into the blender and then add two scoops of ice cream. Blend until the ice cream and milk combine. If you want to make an even better milkshake, add crushed peppermints.

National Peanut Day September 13: Peanuts are a yummy snack, but we all know that peanut butter makes some of the best desserts. Enjoy this food holiday by preparing a delicious sweet treat. For example, take a warm tortilla and fill it with peanut butter, sliced bananas, and mini chocolate chips.

National Cream Filled Donut Day September 14: This is another food holiday that is easy to celebrate. All you need to do is hit your favorite bakery, donut shop, or grocery store. I highly recommend Krispy Kreme Boston Cream donuts.






National Linguini Day September 15: Pasta is such an easy meal to prepare. On this special holiday, just combine linguini along with your favorite pasta sauce, meat, and cheese.

National Guacamole Day September 16: Be adventurous and make guacamole from scratch. Serve it with homemade tortilla chips or on top of tacos.

National Apple Dumpling Day September 17: Apple dumplings are so delicious and require very few ingredients. Make a big batch and serve with vanilla ice cream.

National Cheeseburger Day September 18: On this food holiday, take your cheeseburger to the extreme. Try new flavors and new ingredients. For example, add blue cheese and peppered bacon.

National Butterscotch Pudding Day September 19: Sure you can buy butterscotch pudding at the store, but you can also make it yourself with ease. You may also want to use your homemade butterscotch pudding to prepare a butterscotch pie.






National Rum Punch Day September 20: Obviously this isn't a food holiday that everyone in the family can enjoy. If you don't drink alcohol, try adding rum flavoring to one of your desserts instead.

National Pecan Cookie Day September 21: You can make delicious pecan cookies with only a few ingredients, but why not take it easy on this food holiday and purchase some Pecan Sandies instead?

National Ice Cream Cone Day September 22: There are several creative ways to use ice cream cones.

National White Chocolate Day September 23: There are so many different ways to use white chocolate. But, on this food holiday, why not try a recipe you've never made before? Just do a search for "white chocolate recipes" and pick one that sounds irresistible.

National Cherries Jubilee Day September 24: Cherries Jubilee is another dessert that isn't family friendly, but you can make this dessert family friendly simply by heating cherry pie filling and pouring it over vanilla ice cream.






Crab Meat Newburg Day September 25: If you love seafood, this is the food holiday for you. You can serve Crab Newburg over pasta, rice, or even toast points.

National Pancake Day September 26: Go all out with your pancakes and add cherry pie filling and whipped cream.

National Chocolate Milk Day September 27: Is there a better food holiday? Just grab a big glass of chocolate milk and relax.

Strawberry Cream Pie Day September 28: This happens to be my favorite food holiday, because it falls on my birthday. Just combine strawberries with strawberry pie gel. Pour into a baked pie shell and top with a generous portion of whipped cream.

National Coffee Day September 29: Treat yourself to a delicious coffee drink on this food holiday.






National Hot Mulled Cider Day September 30: This is the perfect drink for cool autumn nights. Just heat apple cider with cinnamon sticks and any other spices you enjoy such as cloves and nutmeg.

40 FACTS OF HALLOWEEN, COMING YOUR WAY!!







  • Because the movie Halloween (1978) was on such a tight budget, they had to use the cheapest mask they could find for the character Michael Meyers, which turned out to be a William Shatner Star Trek mask. Shatner initially didn’t know the mask was in his likeness, but when he found out years later, he said he was honored.

  • The first Jack O’Lanterns were actually made from turnips.

  • Halloween is the second highest grossing commercial holiday after Christmas.

  • The word “witch” comes from the Old English wicce, meaning “wise woman.” In fact, wiccan were highly respected people at one time. According to popular belief, witches held one of their two main meetings, or sabbats, on Halloween night.

  •  Samhainophobia is the fear of Halloween.





  • Fifty percent of kids prefer to receive chocolate candy for Halloween, compared with 24% who prefer non-chocolate candy and 10% who preferred gum.

  • The owl is a popular Halloween image. In Medieval Europe, owls were thought to be witches, and to hear an owl's call meant someone was about to die.

  • According to Irish legend, Jack O’Lanterns are named after a stingy man named Jack who, because he tricked the devil several times, was forbidden entrance into both heaven and hell. He was condemned to wander the Earth, waving his lantern to lead people away from their paths.

  • The largest pumpkin ever measured was grown by Norm Craven, who broke the world record in 1993 with a 836 lb. pumpkin.

  • Stephen Clarke holds the record for the world’s fastest pumpkin carving time: 24.03 seconds, smashing his previous record of 54.72 seconds. The rules of the competition state that the pumpkin must weigh less than 24 pounds and be carved in a traditional way, which requires at least eyes, nose, ears, and a mouth.




  • Trick-or-treating evolved from the ancient Celtic tradition of putting out treats and food to placate spirits who roamed the streets at Samhain, a sacred festival that marked the end of the Celtic calendar year.

  • “Souling” is a medieval Christian precursor to modern-day trick-or-treating. On Hallowmas (November 1), the poor would go door-to-door offering prayers for the dead in exchange for soul cakes.

  • The first known mention of trick-or-treating in print in North America occurred in 1927 in Blackie, Alberta, Canada.

  • “Halloween” is short for “Hallows’ Eve” or “Hallows’ Evening,” which was the evening before All Hallows’ (sanctified or holy) Day or Hallowmas on November 1. In an effort to convert pagans, the Christian church decided that Hallowmas or All Saints’ Day (November 1) and All Souls’ Day (November 2) should assimilate sacred pagan holidays that fell on or around October 31.

  • Black and orange are typically associated with Halloween. Orange is a symbol of strength and endurance and, along with brown and gold, stands for the harvest and autumn. Black is typically a symbol of death and darkness and acts as a reminder that Halloween once was a festival that marked the boundaries between life and death.





  •   Ireland is typically believed to be the birthplace of Halloween.

  • With their link to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (a precursor to Halloween) and later to witches, cats have a permanent place in Halloween folklore. During the ancient celebration of Samhain, Druids were said to throw cats into a fire, often in wicker cages, as part of divination proceedings.

  • Scarecrows, a popular Halloween fixture, symbolize the ancient agricultural roots of the holiday.

  • Halloween has variously been called All Hallows’ Eve, Witches Night, Lamswool, Snap-Apple Night, Samhaim, and Summer’s End.

  • Halloween was influenced by the ancient Roman festival Pomona, which celebrated the harvest goddess of the same name. Many Halloween customs and games that feature apples (such as bobbing for apples) and nuts date from this time. In fact, in the past, Halloween has been called San-Apple Night and Nutcrack Night.




  • Scottish girls believed they could see images of their future husband if they hung wet sheets in front of the fire on Halloween. Other girls believed they would see their boyfriend’s faces if they looked into mirrors while walking downstairs at midnight on Halloween.

  • Because Protestant England did not believe in Catholic saints, the rituals traditionally associated with Hallowmas (or Halloween) became associated with Guy Fawkes Night. England declared November 5th Guy Fawkes Night to commemorate the capture and execution of Guy Fawkes, who co-conspired to blow up the Parliament in 1605 in order to restore a Catholic king.

  • Harry Houdini (1874-1926) was one of the most famous and mysterious magicians who ever lived. Strangely enough, he died in 1926 on Halloween night as a result of appendicitis brought on by three stomach punches.

  • According to tradition, if a person wears his or her clothes inside out and then walks backwards on Halloween, he or she will see a witch at midnight.

  • Mexico celebrates the Days of the Dead (Días de los Muertos) on the Christian holidays All Saints’ Day (November 1) and All Souls’ Day (November 2) instead of Halloween. The townspeople dress up like ghouls and parade down the street.





  • During the pre-Halloween celebration of Samhain, bonfires were lit to ensure the sun would return after the long, hard winter. Often Druid priests would throw the bones of cattle into the flames and, hence, “bone fire” became “bonfire.”

  • Dressing up as ghouls and other spooks originated from the ancient Celtic tradition of townspeople disguising themselves as demons and spirits. The Celts believed that disguising themselves this way would allow them to escape the notice of the real spirits wandering the streets during Samhain.

  •   The National Retail Federation expects consumers in 2010 to spend $66.28 per person—which would be a total of approximately $5.8 billion—on Halloween costumes, cards, and candy. That’s up from $56.31 in 2009 and brings spending back to 2008 levels.

  • According to the National Retail Federation, 40.1% of those surveyed plan to wear a Halloween costume in 2010. In 2009, it was 33.4%. Thirty-three percent will throw or attend a party.

  • In 2010, 72.2% of those surveyed by the National Retail Federation will hand out candy, 46.3% will carve a pumpkin, 20.8% will visit a haunted house, and 11.5% will dress up their pets.



  • Halloween is thought to have originated around 4000 B.C., which means Halloween has been around for over 6,000 years.

  • In 1970, a five-year-old boy Kevin Toston allegedly ate Halloween candy laced with heroin. Investigators later discovered the heroin belonged to the boy’s uncle and was not intended for a Halloween candy.

  • In 1974, eight-year-old Timothy O’Bryan died of cyanide poisoning after eating Halloween candy. Investigators later learned that his father had taken out a $20,000 life insurance policy on each of his children and that he had poisoned his own son and also attempted to poison his daughter.

  • Teng Chieh or the Lantern Festival is one Halloween festival in China. Lanterns shaped like dragons and other animals are hung around houses and streets to help guide the spirits back to their earthly homes. To honor their deceased loved ones, family members leave food and water by the portraits of their ancestors.

  • Halloween celebrations in Hong Kong are known as Yue Lan or the “Festival of the Hungry Ghosts” during which fires are lit and food and gifts are offered to placate potentially angry ghosts who might be looking for revenge.





  • Both Salem, Massachusetts, and Anoka, Minnesota, are the self-proclaimed Halloween capitals of the world.

  • Boston, Massachusetts, holds the record for the most Jack O’Lanterns lit at once (30,128).

  • The Village Halloween parade in New York City is the largest Halloween parade in the United States. The parade includes 50,000 participants and draws over 2 million spectators.

  • In many countries, such as France and Australia, Halloween is seen as an unwanted and overly commercial American influence.

  • Children are more than twice as likely to be killed in a pedestrian/car accident on Halloween than on any other night.