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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 05/15/14

Thursday, May 15, 2014

DULCE DE LECHE ICE CREAM PIE!!

Dulce de Leche Ice Cream Pie with Mocha Fudge Sauce recipe


Start this a day ahead and freeze overnight. For the crust, blend crumbled vanilla wafer cookies in a processor until crumbs form.

ingredients

Crust
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2/3 cup vanilla wafer cookie crumbs (from about 32 cookies)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter, melted
Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup light corn syrup
  • 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 pints caramel ice cream (such as dulce de leche)
  • 1/2 cup chilled whipping cream
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped pecans

preparation

For crust:

Preheat oven to 350°F. Blend pecans and sugar in processor until pecans are finely ground. Add cookie crumbs and cinnamon and process to combine. Add butter and blend until moist clumps form. Press crust onto bottom and up sides of 9-inch glass pie dish. Bake until crust is lightly toasted, about 10 minutes. Cool completely.
For sauce:

Stir 2 tablespoons boiling water and coffee powder in small bowl until powder is dissolved. Whisk sugar and cocoa in heavy medium saucepan. Whisk in 1 cup cream, corn syrup, and coffee mixture. Add chocolate and butter. Bring to boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 4 minutes. Cool 30 minutes. Stir in 1 teaspoon vanilla.
Soften 1 pint ice cream at room temperature 15 minutes. Spread evenly over bottom of crust. Drizzle 3 tablespoons sauce over ice cream. Freeze until sauce sets, about 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, soften remaining 1 pint ice cream at room temperature 15 minutes. Spread evenly atop sauce. Drizzle with 3 tablespoons sauce. Freeze pie until frozen, at least 4 hours. (Sauce and pie can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate sauce. Keep pie frozen.)
Rewarm mocha fudge sauce over low heat, stirring often. Whip 1/2 cup chilled cream, powdered sugar, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla in medium bowl until peaks form. Transfer to pastry bag fitted with star tip. Pipe rosettes of cream around top edge of pie. Sprinkle with chopped pecans. Cut pie into wedges and serve with sauce.

THE CANADIAN TULIP FESTIVAL!!







The Canadian Tulip Festival




 The Canadian Tulip Festival, now in its 61st year, has grown to become the largest Tulip Festival in the world. It preserves the local heritage of Canada’s role in freeing the Dutch during World War II, and the symbolic tulip; a gift in perpetuity to the Canadian people for providing a safe harbour to the Dutch Royal Family at that time.  It is taking place this year, from May 9th through the 19th.
The festival’s mandate is to preserve this heritage and celebrate the tulip as a symbol of international friendship by engaging local organizers, volunteers, artists, performers, tourists and festival-goers in what has become an annual ritual of spring and one of Canada’s best loved and well-known cultural events.





Princess Juliana of the Netherlands






   In the fall of 1945, Princess Juliana of the Netherlands presented Ottawa with 100,000 tulip bulbs. The gift was given in appreciation of the safe haven that members of Holland’s exiled royal family received during the World War II in Ottawa and in recognition of the role which Canadian troops played in the liberation of the Netherlands.
    The tulips have become an important symbol of international friendship and spring, with special meaning to the people of Canada and its Capital Region.






Princesses Margriet, Irene, Beatrix





   In early June 1940, Princess Juliana and her two small daughters secretly boarded a Dutch vessel bound for Halifax. After a long sea voyage, they moved into Ottawa’s Government House. Safe in the Ottawa region, Princess Juliana was able to take over the reins of government-in-exile if the need arose.











The History of the Canadian Tulip Festival

    The birth of Princess Margriet Francisca, the third daughter of Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhard, was a symbol of hope and a source of inspiration for the Dutch who were fighting for their survival in Europe. The only royal baby ever born in North America, her birth created a living bond between the people of Canada and the Netherlands. To ensure the baby’s Dutch citizenship, the Canadian government temporarily ceded a room at the Ottawa Civic Hospital to the Netherlands. On January 19, 1943, the flag of the Netherlands flew on Parliament’s Peace Tower and Princess Margriet was born a Dutch citizen on Dutch soil in the safe haven of Canada. Once the war had ended, the people of the Netherlands and Princess Juliana sent the Canadian people many magnificent gifts, including 100,000 tulip bulbs to Canada’s Capital in gratitude for the involvement of Canadian troops in the liberation of the Netherlands. In 1946, Princess Juliana herself gave an additional 20,000 bulbs to the country that had given her refuge. A few years after the Dutch tulips arrived in 1945, they became a strong attraction in Canada’s Capital, and stunning pictures appeared in newspapers nationwide resulting in more and more events around the annual bloom of tulips.






Malak Karsh, found of the festival




The Birth of a Festival

    The first Canadian Tulip Festival was held in 1953 lead by the Ottawa Board of Trade, at the suggestion of world-renowned photographer Malak Karsh. Karsh is considered the founder of the Festival and his photographs have immortalized the tulip. Through his efforts, the Canadian Tulip Festival was formalized to coincide with the tulip’s annual bloom. In 2002, the Festival celebrated its 50th Anniversary dedicated to its founder, having expanded to an event of 18 days, showcasing over 3 million tulips throughout Canada’s Capital Region.






Tiptoe through the tulips with your clogs


   

 Over the years the Festival has been opened by Governor Generals, Prime Ministers and Royalty, including several return visits from Queen Juliana and Princess Margriet. Through the 1990s and into the new millennium, the Canadian Tulip Festival celebrated the Tulip as a symbol of Peace and Friendship creating an international bond by collaborating with Friendship countries, which include the Netherlands, Turkey, France, Japan, the United States, Great Britain and Australia.












The Festival Today

    To celebrate its roots of International Friendship, the Canadian Tulip Festival created the International Pavilion in Major’s Hill Park and became the “festival without fences” with all park events offering free admission. The International Pavilion provides a venue for over 20 partnering embassies and local cultural groups to showcase their wares and origins to tourists and festival-goers alike.
    Each spring hundreds of thousands of people from all over North America, Europe and Asia make over a million visits to the Canadian Tulip Festival. The event, which grew from the Dutch gift of friendship, has become the world’s largest Tulip Festival. The tulip has also become Ottawa’s official flower, making Ottawa the tulip capital of the North America.