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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 06/12/14

Thursday, June 12, 2014

IT'S TIME FOR A HELPING OF CANDY FACTS!!! YYYUUUUMMMMM!!







    Candy Corn was invented in the 1880s by George Rennigner.
    The oldest company to produce the surgary corn is The Goelitz Company which is now known as the Jelly Belly Company. They have used the same recipe for over 100 years. Can't get enough of this Halloween classic? At the moment, you can buy 10 pound for $81 dollars. Approximately 9 billion pieces of it will be made each year.







   Tootsie Rolls were invented in 1896 by Leo Hirshfield. The product is named after Hirschfield's daughter whose nickname was "Tootsie". In 1896 Tootsie Roll cost one cent. In fact, it was the first "individually wrapped penny candy". Over 100 years later, consumers can still find Tootsie Rolls for a penny. The Tootsie Company makes 64 million Tootsie Rolls a day.








    A fun online Chicago Tribune article suggested that if your favorite Halloween treat is Snickers, it means you probably have an indecisive personality. "Do you want chocolate? Do you want nuts? You don't know. Or do you?" Snickers is the most popular chocolate bar in the entire world. Snickers got its name from a horse. There are around sixteen peanuts in each Snickers bar. They are made by The Mars Company.







    Hershey's produces around 30 different chocolate products that can be given out to trick or treaters on Halloween. Most people probably know that Hershey's Chocolates are made in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The town got its name from the chocolate and its inventor Milton Hershey. But did you know that before it was named Hershey, the town was known as Derry Church? Here is a link to The Hershey Company.
    Think chocolate is boring? Archie Mcphee sells fun Halloween themed products such as gummy maggots, brain flavored zombie mints, and voodoo pop.
According to AOL, the average American household spends $45 dollars on Halloween food and candy. Candied apples are a popular Halloween treat, but their origin remains unknown. Dan Walker is sometimes credited with the invention of the caramel apple, but others believe he was only involved in marketing caramel apples while working at Kraft Foods in the 1950s.

CARAMEL CAKE! OOOHHHHH!!

Caramel Cake recipe




Ask any Southern baker: caramel cake can reduce a fully grown adult to tears—and we don't mean happy tears, either. It's the icing, a challenge that makes fiddly pastries seem like a walk in Washington Park. Caramel icing is made from little more than cooked sugar and milk, but when it comes time to spread it over the cake layers, it has to be just the right temperature—warm enough to be pourable, but cool enough that, when you work it around the cake with an icing spatula it sets in place. If the icing cools too fast, stiffening as you're spreading, you'll tear the beautiful cake layers, which are nigh impossible to repair. And if the icing dosn't cool fast enough, it will overflow the cake stand and onto the counter.

Stressed yet?

Fear not, because we have all you require here—namely, the right recipe with the right instructions so that you know that you're doing the right thing. And we also have some tips, care of our friend Angie Mosier, the Atlanta-based food stylist, writer, and photographer, also the baker of Ted and E.V.'s wedding cake.

According to Angie, even accomplished Southern bakers will lay sheets of waxed paper around the cake stand to catch any too-warm icing that may overflow, so that it can be returned to the bowl to cool further (we prefer to ice the cake on a rack set over a sheet pan lined with wax paper). Angie reccomends having a small amount of hot water and an electric hand-mixer nearby as you ice the cake so that, if the icing seems to be cooling too readily and seizing up, you can quickly soften it by adding a teaspoonful of hot water to the bowl and blending it to loosen it up. And for those times when icing seizes on the cake before you've had a chance to spread it, keep a hair dryer nearby, too, for spot-heating cooled icing

If you're up to the challenge, this is truly a fun one, and succeeding is its own special achievement. As for the cake that results, that perfect salty caramel icing, with its burnt-sugar crispiness dissolving almost instantly on your tongue…it'll bring the happy tears
Ingredients
Cake
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened, plus more for the pans
  • 2 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour, plus more for the pans
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
Icing
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) butter
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • Hot water

preparation

1 Make the cake: Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two round 9 by 2-inch cake pans. Pour about a tablespoon of flour into each of the pans and roll it around, tapping as you go, until the sides and bottom are covered completely with a thin layer of flour. Tip the pans, and tap out excess flour.
2 In a large mixing bowl, mix thoroughly with a whisk the flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda.
3 In a separate large bowl, beat the butter with an electric mixer until creamy, about 30 seconds. Add the sugar in 1/2-cup measures, beating about 15 seconds after each addition and scraping down the sides of the bowl if necessary, until the mixture has lightened in color and become fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs and egg yolks, one at a time, and the vanilla, beating for 15 seconds after each addition.
4 Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture in thirds, alternating with additions of the milk. To avoid overmixing the batter, mix gently with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula after each addition, until the ingredient is just incorporated. Beat until all the ingredients have been incorporated, and then just a few strokes beyond. Divide the batter between the cake pans and spread the tops evenly.
5 Bake until a cake tester or toothpick emerges clean, about 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and let the cakes cool in their pans on a rack for 10 minutes, then slide a thin paring knife around the edge of the pans, and invert the cakes. Turn each cake again so its rounded top is facing up, and cool the cakes completely on the rack.
6 Make the icing: Pour the milk and 3 cups of the sugar into a large, deep, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat, mixing with a whisk. Add the butter and the salt, whisking occasionally until the butter melts. When mixture just simmers, cut the heat, but keep over the warm burner.
7 Pour the remaining 1 cup sugar into a saucepan. Cook the sugar over medium-high heat until it becomes a syrup, stirring every so often with a wooden spoon as it begins to brown, until the sugar syrup is evenly amber colored, 5 to 8 minutes. Pour the syrup into the warm milk mixture, being very careful, as the caramel will bubble and sputter when it hits the hot milk. Turn the heat beneath the pot to high and, whisking gently until all the syrup has completely dissolved into the roiling milk mixture, continue to cook to the soft-ball stage, about 238°F; this may take 8 to 12 minutes.
8 Cut the heat beneath the caramel and gently whisk in the vanilla and the baking soda. Dip a spoon into the caramel, and let it cool to taste it. Season the caramel to taste with salt, and pour it into the bowl of a standing mixer (or use an electric hand-mixer and a large bowl). Beat on low speed as it cools, 15 to 20 minutes depending on the temperature of your kitchen, until the icing is creamy and thick (between 100°F and 105°F). Remove the bowl from the mixer stand and let cool 5 to 10 minutes more, until the icing is between 95°F and 98°F—it should fall off your spatula in a ribbon that remains discernible on the surface of the icing for 10 seconds.
9 Set the first cake layer on a rack set over a sheet plan lined with waxed paper. Have an electric hand-mixer and the hot water nearby to blend a teaspoon or two into the icing if it becomes too thick to spread. Pour enough of the icing over the cake to cover the top in a layer about 1/4 inch thick (if it drips over the edge in places, that's fine; this is an early test of whether it's going to set in place or not). Top the first cake with the second cake layer and pour the rest of the icing in stages over the top of the cake, letting it run down the sides and using an icing spatula to guide the icing around the cake as it drips, until the entire cake is covered, for a traditional, classic look. (If you prefer the dramatic look of cake layers peeking out from behind a curtain of icing drips, by all means choose that route!) If you need to reuse any icing that overflows into the pan, simply move the cake on its rack temporarily, scrape up the icing from the waxed paper with a spatula and return it to the bowl, replace the rack over the pan, and continue to ice the cake.
10 Once the icing has set, using two spatulas carefully transfer the cake from the rack to a cake stand and let stand at room temperature beneath a cake dome until ready to serve. Only refrigerate if you plan to store the cake for more than 2 days.

THE EPSOM DERBY FROM ENGLAND!




    The Derby Stakes, known as The Investec Derby or The Derby and internationally as the Epsom Derby, is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain which is open to three-year-old Thoroughbred colts and fillies. It is run at Epsom Downs over a distance of 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 10 yards (2,423 metres), and it is scheduled to take place each year in early June. It is Britain's richest horse race, and the most prestigious of the country's five Classics. It is sometimes referred to as the Blue Riband of the turf.
    The Epsom Derby is one of the most prestigious and iconic events of the sporting and social calendars. The Ladies day is known for being a highly fashionable event, where ladies compete to win the coveted Style on the Downs competition. Elaborate headwear and colourful dresses are the norm.






History

    The Derby originated at a celebration following the first running of the Oaks Stakes in 1779. A new race was planned, and it was decided that it should be named after either the host of the party, the 12th Earl of Derby, or one of his guests, Sir Charles Bunbury. According to legend the decision was made by the toss of a coin, but it is probable that Bunbury, the Steward of the Jockey Club, deferred to his host. The inaugural running of the Derby was held on 4 May 1780. It was won by Diomed, a colt owned by Sir Charles Bunbury, who collected prize money of £1,065 15s. The first four runnings were contested over 1 mile, but this was amended to the current distance of 1½ miles in 1784. Lord Derby achieved his first success in the event in 1787, with a horse called Sir Peter Teazle.






    The starting point of the race was moved twice during the 19th century. The first move, suggested by Lord George Bentinck, was in 1848, and the second was in 1872. It was discovered in 1991 that the exact length of the race was 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 10 yards.
    The Derby has inspired many similar events around the world. National variations include the Prix du Jockey Club, the Irish Derby, the Deutsches Derby, the Derby Italiano and in Australia, the AJC Australian Derby, Queensland Derby, South Australian Derby, the VRC Victoria Derby and WATC Derby. The New Zealand Derby contested at Ellerslie Racecourse, Auckland is the richest Derby in the Southern Hemisphere. Several races in the United States bear the "Derby" name, the most famous of which is the Kentucky Derby









Records

  • Fastest winning time (at Epsom) – 2m 31.33s, Workforce (2010)
  • Widest winning margin – 10 lengths, Shergar (1981)
  • Longest odds winners – Jeddah (1898), Signorinetta (1908), Aboyeur (1913), 100/1
  • Shortest odds winner – Ladas (1894), 2/9

Epsom Derby, 1927



  • Most runners – 34 (1862)
  • Fewest runners – 4 (1794
Timeline


  • 1838 Derby winner1805 – One of the horses was brought down by a spectator.
  • 1825 – Middleton didn't start before or after winning the Derby.
  • 1838 – Amato never raced before or after winning the Derby.
  • 1844 – The original winner Running Rein was disqualified as he was actually an ineligible four-year-old horse named Maccabeus.
  • 1881 – Iroquois became the first American-bred to win a leg of the British triple crown.






  • 1884 – The race finished with a dead-heat between Harvester and St. Gatien.
  • 1887 – Merry Hampton is the most recent horse to win the Derby with no previous victories.
  • 1894 – The winner was owned by the Prime Minister at the time, the 5th Earl of Rosebery.
  • 1901 – The first year in which a mechanical starting gate was used.
  • 1909 – Minoru was the first Derby winner owned by a reigning monarch, King Edward VII, who had previously won twice as Prince of Wales.
  • 1913 – The 6/4 favourite Craganour, owned by Charles B. Ismay, brother of J. Bruce Ismay of the Titanic, was controversially disqualified, and the race was awarded to the 100/1 outsider Aboyeur. Suffragette Emily Davison is struck by King George V's horse, Anmer, she dies three days later.
  • 1916 – Fifinella, who also won the Oaks, is the most recent of six fillies to win the race. The previous five were Eleanor (1801), Blink Bonny (1857), Shotover (1882), Signorinetta (1908), Tagalie (1912).


Persimmon, Derby winner in 1896


  • 1921 – The winner Humorist died two weeks after the race.
  • 1927 – The first Derby to be broadcast by the BBC.
  • 1932 – April the Fifth is the most recent winner trained at Epsom.
  • 1946 – Airborne is the most recent of 4 grey horses to win the Derby.
  • 1953 – Pinza was the first winner in the race for the jockey Sir Gordon Richards, after 27 unsuccessful attempts.
  • 1960 - Although there had been an experimental TV transmission of the race in the early 1930s, regular television coverage of the Derby began this year, initially on both BBC and ITV.
  • 1989 – The runner-up Terimon is the longest-priced horse to finish placed in the Derby, at odds of 500/1.
  • 1996 – Alex Greaves became the first (and so far only) lady jockey to ride in the race. She finished last on the filly Portuguese Lil.




  • 1998 – The most recent filly to take part, the 1,000 Guineas winner Cape Verdi, started as 11/4 favourite but could only finish 9th.
  • 2006 – Martin Dwyer's winning ride on Sir Percy subsequently won the Lester Award for "Flat Ride of the Year".
  • 2007 – Authorized provided jockey Frankie Dettori with his first winner in the Derby after 14 previous attempts.
  • 2008 – Jim Bolger, the trainer of the winner New Approach, had left the horse entered for the race "by mistake", having not initially intended to run.

TOP 10 OVERUSED AND INSANELY OBVIOUS HORROR MOVIE GIMMICKS!








    If you’ve seen enough horror movies, you’ll notice that they’ve become increasingly stale nowadays. Sometimes it feels like the characters on screen know when they’re about to get whacked by the psycho killer in the woods, and even they can’t fool the audience. How stupid do some of these movie directors believe the average American viewer has become? The following bag of tricks are currently destroying modern horror cinema:












1.) The Peek-a-boo, I See You

    This is the moment when the director cleverly places the actor (usually some blond that can’t stop crying) into the right third of the screen. The camera pans in slowly and the creepy music starts playing. Then suddenly the killer’s face pops out the shadows directly behind the sobbing blonde. Since it would make too much sense for the killer to hack his victim instantly, (as killers in the real world are prone to do, don’t ask me but I know) the director always gives the heroine a few seconds to realize that some psycho is behind her before she runs screaming down the hallway. This leads to my next boneheaded Hollywood gaff.














2.) The Hide and Seek

    I don’t understand the obsession with childhood games with these directors. My theory is that in order to be considered for directing a horror movie you must prove you have an infantilism fetish. No wonder Hitchcock wore those huge pants; he was hiding a diaper underneath.
    The Hide and Seek usually occurs right after, and sometimes before, the “Peek-a-boo, I see you.” Invariably, the killer walks slower than molasses while the heroine barrels away like an Olympic sprinter. By the time one wonders why she doesn’t just run straight home or to the nearest police station, the heroine is already stuffing herself into some hiding spot like an oven, walk-in freezer, or meat packing plant.
















3.) The Alley Oop

    This is also known as the “false alarm.” This is the scene where the heroine is stumbling around trying to find one of her friends. She thinks she hears a noise and turns her head. Then, just as she rounds a corner she crashes into a body in the shadows. Oh no! Then the camera angles around and we see it’s just her boyfriend with a silly grin. Whew. That’s the set-up. The spike comes when suddenly the killer jumps out of nowhere and the audience is forced to accept that although he had all the time in the world to slay the heroine when she was alone he chose not to for the sake of drama.















4.) The Scooby-doo

    I have to credit the creators of Scooby-doo for making perhaps the best animated horror spoof ever. But sometimes I swear I’ve watched scenes that look like they were actually stolen from the cartoon.
    The “Scooby-doo” is your prototypical chase scene. The only thing more obnoxious than watching out of shape actors stumble across the scene is how the camera jerks around to make us feel like we’re in the moment.
















5.) The Ingenious “Let’s Split Up” Game Plan

    In all fairness, the character who suggests this is usually the drunken frat boy with popped collars who gets slashed first anyway. Even though all the actors might be in a single house, the idea that they need to form three search parties to search all of 10 rooms somehow makes perfect sense to them.















6.) The Deadly Wee-wee

    This is almost always a given in any horror flick. Some moron goes off alone to do his business and gets brained by a pick-ax/shot with an arrow/eaten by the woods, etc. It’s such a freebie for the director it amounts to artistic welfare.
















7.) The Lazarus

    I think it’s fair to say that ever since Michael Myers survived getting plugged with six .357 rounds at the end of Halloween, the horror genre has slid disastrously downhill. There’s a new rule in Hollywood. Killers can’t die until they’ve appeared in enough annoying sequels to cause suicide pacts even among the most diehard fans.
Nothing short of a nuclear explosion seems to stop your modern day madman. Even then we’d still be treated to seeing the killer’s hand twitch among the radioactive rubble to let us know he’s still alive right before the credits roll.














8.) The Great Escape

    This is when the whole freaking police department has the killer cornered on a ledge or in a hole somewhere and he still gets away among a barrage of bullets. We’re meant to believe that, like the “Lazarus” trick, the psycho is somehow invincible. Yet when he attacks the heroine moments later she just knees him in the groin to get away.
















9.) The Famous Coitus Interruptus

    It seems like all people have time for in horror movies is having sex and walking into dark rooms. At some point the high school quarterback and his doe-eyed cheerleader get it on in a lake, or a bed, or a bed in a lake. Then thwack! A machete through the chest. I’ve always admired that subtle Hollywood finger wagging at premarital relations, but the redundancy of the scene is a crime as well.

STRAWBERRY CHOCOLATE FREEZER PIE!!

Strawberry-Chocolate Freezer Pie recipe



Strawberries are full of vitamin C, which does double duty: It helps you burn more fat during exercise and helps build skin-firming collagen, resulting in a slimmer, prettier you!

ingredients

  • Chocolate Crust
  • 3 cups lowfat strawberry ice cream or frozen yogurt, softened light whipped cream
  • Light whipped cream
  • 1 cup sliced strawberries

preparation

Spread ice cream evenly over crust. Dip a large spoon in hot water and run it over ice cream to smooth the top. Place pie in freezer until solid, 2 hours or up to 3 days. Before serving, spray a border of whipped cream (about 1 cup) around edge of pie. Mound strawberries in center.

KIRKPINAR-OIL WRESTLING FROM TURKEY!








    Kırkpınar is a Turkish oil-wrestling (Turkish: yağlı güreş) tournament. It is held annually, usually in late June, near Edirne, Turkey since 1346.
    Before each bout, the wrestlers pour olive oil over their entire bodies, and the matches take place in an open, grassy field, with the contestants naked except for trousers made of leather, which extend to just above the knee. Victory is achieved when one wrestler either pins the other to the ground (as in many other forms of wrestling) or lifts his opponent above his shoulders.
    It now holds a Guinness World Record for the longest running sports competition.















History

    Oldest known evidenceThe history of oil wrestling links straight back to 2650 BC with evidence both from Ancient Egypt, Assyria and around. The Babylonian body of evidence, a tiny bronze, excavated near the Chafadji-temple. It is as clear as plain day-light that the bronze concern oilwrestlers: both athletes are pictured with oilvessels on their head.
    The oldest known proof of the existence of oil-wrestling in Ancient Egypt is found in limestone from the tomb of Ptahhoteb near Saqqara from the fifth dynasty (about 2650 BC) from the same period as the Chafadji-bronze.














    Another appealing proof is about 4000 years old and painted like a cartoon in a tomb near Beni Hasan in Egypt. The deceased, who occupied this tomb must have been a famous oil-wrestler in his time.
    On the first picture, greasing of the wrestler and the oil stored in a reed stem is seen. After that, the wrestling starts. The pictures could have been taken yesterday during a Kırkpinar. The last picture down shows the unchanged three step triumph of oiled wrestling. From this period we can trace the basic rules.
    Centuries later, the Persians conquest Egypt and Persian shah-kings occupied the throne of the Pharaoh's.















Oil-wrestling in Iran

    The history of the oil-wrestling tournaments as we know today links back to the Persian Mythical Era, which, according to Ferdowsi's Shahnameh, started 1065 BC. The legendary pehlivan of this era is called Rostam, a hero constantly saving his country from the evil forces.
    The ceremonial start of oil-wrestling, called by its Persian name "Peshrev" has clear links with old Iranian institutes as the zurkhane, literally "house of strength". The building consists of a court, around which the men, who will perform, arrange themselves, and a gallery for the ostad ("master") or morshed (spiritual leader) and the musicians. Nowadays, the musical accompaniment consists of a drum and recitation of portions of Ferdowsi's Shahname. There are various rhythms employed, and a variety of movements associated with them, including displays of strength in manipulating heavy objects (such as weights and chains) and acrobatics.















    Here the origin of the peshrev has to be found, by some considered to be a warming up and greet-the-audience ceremony, to others a participatory form of dance. Certain different from the usual step-right, step-left, step-right, kick-left, step-left, kick-right dance found all over the area.

Oil-wrestling for Sultan and Shah

    During the period Islam was brought into Asia Minor, spirituality and philosophy became part of the physical garment of the pehlivan. Oil-wrestling was established as a sport on its own. In Iran and the Ottoman Empire alike wrestling became the national sport. In Iran, wrestling grew to the customary institution of the zurkhane strong house, where people go to socialise and engage in athletic exercise. The wrestler is the strong-man in popular culture (in Persian the term is "big neck"), but he is also the pahlavan, the knightly hero, who is a free-living spirit and is generous and loyal.
















    The year 1360 is adapted by the organizers of the Edirne Kırkpınar as date Ottoman soldiers started to organize annual oil-wrestling tournaments in Kırkpınar, a wrestling field "within Samona village". According to the Guinness Book of World Records, this legend made the Kırkpınar world's oldest continuously sanctioned sporting competition.
The last bout between the two finalists lasted all night as neither was able to defeat the other. They were found dead the next morning, their bodies still intertwined. They were buried underneath a nearby fig tree, whereupon their comrades headed to conquer Edirne.
    After the conquest, the soldiers came upon another fig tree, surrounded by a crystal-clear spring, so they renamed the surrounding meadow (which until then had been known as Ahirköy) Kırkpınar, which translates from Turkish as "forty springs" or "forty sources".













    To commemorate the heroism of the conquering warriors, a wrestling tournament was re-enacted annually at this site, and the oldest still-contested sanctioned sporting competition in the world began
    Whatever tales, myths and stories. There has always been a common respect for the oil-wrestlers. The pehlivan is being stronger than anybody, having a well built body, clothed in heavy leather pants. Up till today, the wrestlers pour olive oil onto their bodies. And still you see a younger wrestler defeating an older wrestler kiss the older wrestler's hand.












    In 1590, a peace agreement was reached between Murat III and the Persian Shah. The model of the wrestling pants go back to this period. The model is still same for the Iranian "pahlivan" and the Turkish "pehlivan", except that the Turkish wrestling pants are made of leather and are called "kispet", while the Iranian pahlivan wears a "pirpet", made of silk.
    Famous wrestlers from Iran came to Istanbul to compete with the Ottoman champions, and the Turkish champs were invited to Persia to show their strength














Collecting Strong Men

    Before 1582, all recruits came from prisoners of war, the devsirme, or other slave sources. With that devsirme, the very best and strongest guys were recruited from all the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. Only the strongest and most healtiest boys had a chance to become a pehlivan. Always known to be free enough to be honest and through history trusted for his words and behaviours.














    Everywhere in the Ottoman Empire were wrestling championships held. Every city and village had its annual wrestling, like nowadays. Wrestling occurred in a variety of contexts, including social and ceremonial events. There was wrestling on religious festival days, during special evenings of the Muslim fasting-month of Ramadan, on agricultural events, circumcisions and weddings. On special occasions, charity wrestling competitions were organized outside the palaces. Only the best wrestlers were accepted in training to become members of the elite Janissary Corps.













Oil-wrestling for French Impératrice Eugenie

    When the Ottoman sultan visited France in 1867, oil-wrestlers were part of his entourage and Impératrice Eugenie visited the wrestling-tournament. Wrestling was tough, but oil-wrestling was even harder. It was considered the most difficult sport in the world. In these days, the expression "Fort comme une Turc" (strong as a Turk) revived from the crusade-days.
   During a year, about 300 different oil-wrestling games are held in Turkey. They host 10 million spectators on average.







Statue of past champions






Introduction of Time

    Until 1975, there was no time limit to wrestling in Kırkpınar. The pehlivans would wrestle sometimes one, sometimes two days, until they could establish superiority to one another. Wrestling games would go on from 9a.m. in the morning until dusk and the ones that could not beat each other would go on the next day. After 1975, wrestling was limited to 40 minutes in the baspehlivan wrestling category. If there is no winner within these limits, the pehlivans wrestle for 15 minutes with the score recorded. The ones that can score points in this last period are accepted as the winners. In other categories, the wrestling time is limited to 30 minutes. If there is no winner, 10 minutes of score wrestling follows.

Oil Wrestling in Other Parts of Europe and The World

    The "Mother of All Sports" came in 1997 for the first ever to Western Europe, when the European Champions League were held in Amsterdam. No less than 22 television teams covered the event, and scenes from the Amsterdam Kırkpınar were shown at CNN and the BBC alike.






Some of the musical entertainment






    The 2nd European Oil-Wrestling Championship held in Amsterdam had already a final with 42 wrestlers from Turkey, the Netherlands and other European countries. Winner was Cengiz Elbeye, Edirne Kırkpınar oil-wrestling champion. Addressing the ceremony held upon the start of the matches, Erkut Onart, the Turkish Consul General in the Netherlands, said that he believed the friendship between the Turkish society and the European countries is intensified when these kinds of cultural values are brought to Europe.
    In the world of oil-wrestling, Amsterdam became the most important annual after Edirne.













    Oil-wrestling is a growing sport, not limited to Turkey only. However, it is difficult for foreign wrestlers to enter this National Turkish Championship. In 2000, Dutch oil-wrestler Melvin Witteveen's entry in Edirne was rejected, while Kadir Yilmaz, beaten by Witteveen some weeks earlier at the Amsterdam Kırkpınar, was allowed to participate due to his double Turko-Dutch nationalities.
    As the winners of the categories of the Amsterdam Kırkpınar in Holland are considered to be European Champions, this creates the strange fact that according international standards the Amsterdam Kırkpınar tops Edirne, as latter being the National championship of Turkey only, repudiating non-Turkish entries.
    The event attracted little attention outside of Turkey until the 1990s, when the style of wrestling began to spread to Western Europe. It has become particularly popular in the Netherlands, which now hosts its own annual version of the tournament, attracting participants from throughout Europe. Yağlı güreş wrestling matches are also held in Japan.