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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 03/13/15

Friday, March 13, 2015

TOP SELLING CANDIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD!

  You wouldn't wear the same food costume every Halloween — so why trick-or-treat with the same candy? This year, try something new. If you're already well-versed in the categories of movie treats and nostalgic candies, then consider serving various candies from around the world. Need a bit of an education in global candy culture? Then test your knowledge of the world's candies and check out some of our favorites here.



Bounty, United Kingdom

Bounty, United Kingdom



   Mounds lovers will appreciate Bounty, a coconut-filled bar enrobed with milk chocolate.



Botan Rice Candy, Japan

Botan Rice Candy, Japan

   Even if you've never been to Japan, you may have come across Botan Rice Candy in Asian supermarkets. Botan, which means "peony," is a prominent brand in Japan and makes a sticky rice candy with a slightly citrusy flavor.



ToffeeCrisp, United Kingdom

ToffeeCrisp, United Kingdom

   NestlĂ© makes a number of chocolate bars in Europe that aren't readily available in the United States. One of them is ToffeeCrisp, a staple in the United Kingdom. The long, slender milk chocolate bar is filled with crackling puffed rice and caramel. Its motto? "Somebody, somewhere, is eating a ToffeeCrisp."



Cheong Woo, Korea

Cheong Woo, Korea

   Leave it to South Korea to come up with pumpkin candy — a mellow, slightly salty candy with a prominent squash-like flavor and the texture of Starburst. If you can track it down, it's perfect for this time of year.



Kinder Country, Germany

Kinder Country, Germany

   I wasn't sure what to make of Kinder Country, which was described on the wrapper as "milk chocolate with rich milk filling." It was unlike anything I'd ever had in the States: a creamy, milky white center, made crunchy with puffed rice and then doused in milk chocolate.



Lion, United Kingdom

Lion, United Kingdom

   I was really happy to bite into a Lion Bar, another chocolate confection that hails from the UK. It was similar to a ToffeeCrisp, with caramel, crisp cereal, and a wafer enrobed in milk chocolate and reminded me of an even heartier 100 Grand. This lion was one of my top candy picks and definitely made me roar.



Baci, Italy

Baci, Italy

   Hershey's isn't the only one with kisses — Italy has its own version, Perugina's Baci. These chocolate bonbons are filled with hazelnut chocolate cream, topped with a whole hazelnut, and wrapped in a love note.



Peko Milky Candy, Japan

Peko Milky Candy, Japan

   Peko-chan Milk Candy is commonplace among children in Japan. The individually-wrapped candies are firm yet chewy and have a distinctive sweet milk flavor.



Yorkie, United Kingdom

Yorkie, United Kingdom

   The Yorkie bar — originally titled so because it was made by Rowntrees of York — was created in the 1970s as a larger chocolate bar alternative to Cadbury's Dairy-Milk. To this day, the chocolate stays true to its original branding with the slogan, "It's not for girls!"



Chimes Mango Ginger Chews, Indonesia

Chimes Mango Ginger Chews, Indonesia

   I'd never heard of Chimes Mango Ginger Chews before, but these individually-wrapped Indonesian ginger candies in the quaint tin turned out to be my favorite. They had a latent heat and spiciness to them, thanks to ginger that's grown on volcanic soil in East Java.



HOW TO MARBLE ROYAL ICING!

 This diy is from www.sweetopia.net .  Another get turtorial to add a little decorating tip for your cookies and cakes.  Sit back, relax and take it in.  OOOOMMMM!!!






It’s called marbling, feathering or swirling, which is basically when one or more colors of icing are applied to a base coat of icing, and then a toothpick, cake tester, pin or skewer is dragged through the icing to create a marbled or swirly effect.



Each combination of colors creates another look.



Just by changing the way you set up your lines and drag the toothpick, completely different designs emerge.



You can incorporate the swirled icing into your design, like these feathered cookie friends:



How to Make Marbled, Swirled or Feathered Decorated Cookies


If you’d like to try the marbled effect, the most important thing for your success is the consistency of the icing. To help you with that, my cookie decorating tutorial goes over some tips and the 10-second rule here.



Once you have your cookies baked and icing made, it’s time to begin by piping your outline. I like to use a piping bag fitted with a coupler and #2 tip.
Fill or flood your cookie with royal icing right away. You could leave the outline to set to create a solid dam, but you’ll be able to see the border when the icing dries.



Once you’ve filled the whole cookie in, shake it gently left to right on your work surface, to help smooth the icing out.



Add your second (or more), layers or colors of icing. Work as quickly as you can before the icing sets.



Take a toothpick, pin, skewer or dough tester (hey, whatever works!), and drag it through the icing. In this case I drew S-like shapes. The image below shows which direction I dragged the toothpick in.



Finish off the edges with dots or another design of your choice and you’re done!




The hearts are made by piping dots and dragging the toothpick through the center of each dot.





Let your cookies dry, package and ribbon.




Simple, easy, fun and impressive!
If you prefer video, I’ve got a video tutorial on marbling here for you to watch.
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I’d also like to send out a big thanks agian to Bridget at Bake at 350 for having me as a guest contributor for her blog a few weeks ago. In case you didn’t see the post, it’s what I’ve shared with you here today, and if you haven’t seen Bridget’s eye-candy cookies and baked goods of all kinds yet, check them out by clicking here!
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Happy marbling!
xo,
Marian
p.s. Update – I’ve received so many emails asking where I got my square, fluted cookie cutter, so here’s the link for you.

CARNIVAL OF BINCHE FROM BELGIUM!!!!








    The Carnival of Binche is an event that takes place each year in the Belgian town of Binche, during the Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday preceding Ash Wednesday. The carnival is best known of all the others that take place in Belgium, at the same time and has been proclaimed as a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. Its history dates back to approximately the 14th century.













    Events related to the carnival begin up to 7 weeks prior to the primary celebrations. Street performances and public displays traditionally occur on the Sundays approaching Ash Wednesday, consisting of prescribed musical acts, dancing and marching. Large numbers of Binche's inhabitants spend the Sunday prior to Ash Wednesday in costume.











    The centerpiece of the carnival, are clown like performers, known as Gilles. Appearing, for the most part, on "Shrove" Tuesday, the Giles are characterised by their vibrant dress, wax masks and wooden footwear. They number up to 1,000 at any given time, ranging in age from 3 to 60 years old, and are customarily male. The honor of being a Gille at the carnival is something that is aspired to by local men. From dawn on the morning of the carnival's final day, Gilles appear in the center of Binche, to dance to the sound of drums and ward off evils spirits by slapping sticks together. Later, during the day, they don large hats adorned with Ostrich plums, which can cost upward of $300 dollars to rent, and march through town carrying baskets of oranges. These oranges are thrown to, and sometimes at, members of the crowd that gather to view the procession. The vigor and longevity of the orange throwing event has in the past, caused damage to property...some residents choose to seal windows to prevent this.











    On Shrove Tuesday townspeople don their fancy costumes that were imagined and made months before and created by each participant. In the morning at approximately 8 a.m. the drums go from house to house to gather up the participants. At about 10 a.m., the small groups collected by the drums meet in the heart of Binche. It is the moment the townspeople prefer, when they discover the marvelous, original costumes. At about 3:30 p.m., people gather at the station area. The societies go back to the center of Binche, dancing to the music of the drums and the brass bands, forming a living multicolored ribbon.











    On Shrove Monday, the feast is a traditional, more private gathering of locals. To the tune of the viols and the hurdy-gurdies, they all go from pub to pub, and from pub to friends and neighbors houses, as they get ready to invite the voil, who are dancing in the streets.
    At about 3 p.m. the children gather, just like the adults had done the day before. The younger ones dance to the music of the drums and brass bands. They then convene in the Town Square, they all dance to the "rondeau de l'amite." Then after hours of dancing and singing until about 8 p.m., they leave to enjoy fireworks at the stationing area.