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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 10/12/15

Monday, October 12, 2015

HISTORY OF THE JACK O' LANTERN!





Image result for jackolantern
Here;s a picture of the moon from last year.  Kind of looks like a Jack O'"lantern





   Every October, carved pumpkins peer out from porches and doorsteps in the United States and other parts of the world. Gourd-like orange fruits inscribed with ghoulish faces and illuminated by candles are a sure sign of the Halloween season. The practice of decorating “jack-o’-lanterns”—the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack—originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas. Irish immigrants brought the tradition to America, home of the pumpkin, and it became an integral part of Halloween festivities.



The Legend of "Stingy Jack"


   People have been making jack-o'-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed "Stingy Jack." According to the story, Stingy Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn't want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his pocket next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. The next year, Jack again tricked the Devil into climbing into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree's bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years.















   Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, upset by the trick Jack had played on him and keeping his word not to claim his soul, would not allow Jack into hell. He sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack put the coal into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as "Jack of the Lantern," and then, simply "Jack O'Lantern."
   In Ireland and Scotland, people began to make their own versions of Jack's lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack o'lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o'-lanterns.

















   In the United States, pumpkins go hand in hand with the fall holidays of Halloween and Thanksgiving. An orange fruit harvested in October, this nutritious and versatile plant features flowers, seeds and flesh that are edible and rich in vitamins. Pumpkin is used to make soups, desserts and breads, and many Americans include pumpkin pie in their Thanksgiving meals. Carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns is a popular Halloween tradition that originated hundreds of years ago in Ireland. Back then, however, jack-o’-lanterns were made out of turnips or potatoes; it wasn’t until Irish immigrants arrived in America and discovered the pumpkin that a new Halloween ritual was born.





Pumpkin Facts


  • Pumpkins are a member of the gourd family, which includes cucumbers, honeydew melons, cantaloupe, watermelons and zucchini. These plants are native to Central America and Mexico, but now grow on six continents.

  • The largest pumpkin pie ever baked was in 2005 and weighed 2,020 pounds.                                                                            

  • Pumpkins have been grown in North America for five thousand years. They are indigenous to the western hemisphere.

  • In 1584, after French explorer Jacques Cartier explored the St. Lawrence region of North    America, he reported finding  "gros melons." The name was translated into English as "pompions," which has since evolved into the modern "pumpkin."

  • Pumpkins are low in calories, fat, and sodium and high in fiber. They are good sources of        Vitamin A, Vitamin B, potassium, protein, and iron.

  • The heaviest pumpkin weighed 1,810 lb 8 oz and was presented by Chris Stevens at the       Stillwater Harvest Fest in  Stillwater, Minnesota, in October 2010.

  • Pumpkin seeds should be planted between the last week of May and the middle of June.       They take between 90 and 120 days to grow and are picked in October when they are bright orange in color. Their seeds can be saved to grow new pumpkins the next year.







TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR JACK-O-LANTERN FRESH TILL HALLOWEEN!!!


  Now that you've chosen the perfect pumpkin, carved a flawless design into the pumpkin and made it into a Halloween jack-o-lantern, how do you keep the pumpkin fresh until Halloween?  You must keep your pumpkin hydrated, and there are several ways of doing that.  Here are some tips for keeping your jack-o-lantern just-carved fresh until Halloween.










 After you have carved the jack-o-lantern design into your pumpkin, coat the cut edges and the inside of the pumpkin with petroleum jelly.  Good old Vaseline will help seal in the moisture of the pumpkin and extend the life of your jack-o-lantern.  Vegetable oil can be used instead of Vaseline, or spray the inside of the pumpkin with hair spray.  Either of the three will seal in moisture and keep your pumpkin fresh until Halloween.










 If the cut edges of your jack-o-lantern have begun to curl, soak the pumpkin in a tub of water overnight to re-hydrate it.  After removing the pumpkin from the tub of water, allow to drain for about half an hour and then pat dry.  If you add one teaspoon of bleach per gallon of water for the pumpkin soak, it will inhibit the growth of mold in your pumpkin.  Of course this bleach and water solution will not work for a jack-o-lantern that has painted designs, or other ornamentation's, but there is another way to keep a highly decorated jack-o-lantern hydrated.











   To keep a painted or decorated jack-o-lantern hydrated, mist the pumpkin with water daily.  Cover the jack-o-lantern with a damp towel when it's not on display or place the jack-o-lantern inside a plastic trash bad and put it in your refrigerator.  Doing any or all of these things will keep your pumpkin hydrated and extend the life of your jack-o-lantern that you worked so hard to create.











A battery operated faux candle inside your jack-o-lantern will keep the pumpkin fresh looking longer than a regular candle or tea light.  A battery operated faux candle does not produce heat, they are also safer than a candle, no flame inside your jack-o-lantern, no fire hazard.
   If you must use a candle in your jack-o-lantern, sprinkle a little nutmeg or cinnamon on the underside of the pumpkin top.  When the candle flame warms the top of the pumpkin, the nutmeg or cinnamon will release a nice fragrance.  But when using a real candle, you must diligently hydrate your pumpkin with some of the above mentions tips, or your jack-o-lantern will not survive until Halloween.