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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 02/12/16

Friday, February 12, 2016

TOP 10 MOST DISGUSTING CANDIES!

  Candy is normally a tasty little sweet treat designed to give pleasure to all. However, that is not always the case, as this list proves. For some unknown reason, some candy manufacturers have recently started producing the most disgusting candies you could image (they must be running out of ideas). Here is our list of the most disgusting candies you could ever eat.


10.  Ear Wax Candy
Earwax




  I don’t care how this candy tastes, who in their right mind would enjoy scraping ear wax out of a plastic ear for eating? The whole idea just makes me want to gag! It even comes with its own swab. How many kids are going to start digging in their ears after they run out candy I wonder? Smart.



9.  Candy Scabs
Candyscabs


 
   The gross factor in these candies is not their flavor, but the fact that they are designed to look like scabs – complete with plasters. I could possibly cope with that, but just imagine this scenario: Johnny and Jimmy are playing hide and seek. Jimmy hides in the bush that his dog Rover just recently pooped in. Jimmy inadvertently gets Rover’s poop on his hand and doesn’t realize it. They finish playing and mommy gives them some Candy Scabs to eat. Jimmy sticks it on his hand, pulls it off, and…. I think you get the picture. Dumb idea.



8.  Dubbel Zout
Dubbelzout


 
   The first thing this Dutch candy has going against it is that it is licorice flavored. I know a lot of people like the taste of licorice, but a lot of people voted for George Bush too – it doesn’t make it right. The next problem here is that this is licorice made with an enormous amount of salt. That’s right – it is salt “candy”. Add to that the fact that it looks like something you would expect to find on the floor of an English nightclub, and you have the makings of one of the worst candies ever.


7.  Hotlix Candy
Hotlixcandy


 
   Okay – it is sweet – I will give them that, but inside each of these tasty candies is a REAL LIFE scorpion. Yup – when you lick through the sugar coating, you get to chow down on scorpion guts. Whoever came up with this candy needs to be forced to eat some Dubbel Zout.



6.  Gorilla Boogers
Gorillaboogers


   We are really walking a thin line with this one – gorilla boogers are sweetened dried black beans (popular in Asian cooking). I was on holiday in korea once and had some of their sweet bean candy (they beat the beans to a pulp then shape it in to small bite sized pieces). It tasted like dirt. These boogers are made from the same beans. They taste like dirt too. Sweetened dirt. Enough said.



5.  Ant Candy
Antcandy


 
   Like the scorpion candy above, this is basically a lump of melted sugar with a bunch of dead ants thrown in to it. Of all the things in the world that they could have thrown in to their candy, what the hell made them choose ants. How does this stuff get past the FDA?



4.  Jane-Jane Tasty Tuna Tidbits
Tastytuna


 
   Tuna was invented by mother nature for hippy vegetarians and people trying to shed some fat – so how has it managed to find its way in to candy? The main ingredient in these little blobs of sugary disgustingness is tuna. After that comes a bunch of chemicals of unknown origin, and finally sugar. Seriously – who would eat fish flavored candy?


3.  Crick-Ettes
Crickettes

   Just because Moses and the Jews ate locusts in the desert doesn’t mean anyone should do it now! These are real crickets sprinkled with a variety of flavors. I realize that chips (which they are similar to) are not usually labeled as candy, but they are so gross (and both are equally bad for you) that they deserve a spot here. Anyone that eats these things by choice deserves to be hit with a plague of boils.



2.  Durian Candy
Duriancandy


 
   Durian fruit is a common fruit in Southeast Asia. To people unfamiliar to it, it usually evokes feelings of utter disgust. One food writer said: “its odor is best described as pig-shit, turpentine and onions, garnished with a gym sock.” You are not even allowed to bring this stuff in to hospitals or hotels in South East Asia. In Singapore, they have signs that forbid you from taking it on the public transport system (see here). That is how disgusting it is. So, it makes a lot of sense to make candy out of it. Not. But there you have it – someone has done it. This one was nearly number 1 on the list, until we discovered BeanBoozled…



1.  BeanBoozled
Beanboozled


 
   BeanBoozled are jellybeans made by the company that brought us Gourmet JellyBeans. In a box of BeanBoozled we find 10 colors of beans and 20 flavors – every color has one tasty flavor, and a disgusting flavor – the idea is that you never know whether you are about to get a good one or a bad one. This makes it ideal for party games. So – why is this number one on the list? After you read the selection of “bad” flavors, you will understand: Skunk Spray, Moldy Cheese, Baby Wipes, Rotten Egg, Vomit, and more. And guess what? They really taste like their names. Next time you are watching a movie in the dark with friends, slip a few of these in to their bag of jellybeans for a great gag (literally).

MAKE YOUR OWN POLYMER CLAY!

  This diy comes from www.thenewnew.blogspot.com .  I very ingenious idea if you love to mess around with clay and sculpt your own holiday figurines and other misc. items.  It's also alot cheaper that buying fimo clay (they are the ones that make most of the polymer clay you find at arts and crafts stores)  at the craft store. Have fun and make something today!


Homemade Polymer Clay


At different points over the last few years I've played around with different kinds of homemade "clay." My favorite is a polymer clay also known as cold porcelain. Its main ingredients are cornstarch and white PVA or Elmer's glue. I like it because it's smooth and a little bit elastic to work with and dries extremely hard. It's also relatively non-porous so it takes paint really well. And it doesn't degrade over time like baker's clay or salt clay does. I've used it to cover blown-out chicken eggs for Christmas ornaments, as well as to make various and sundry bowls, boxes and pendant blanks, among other things.


 




 
But it took awhile to get the recipe right. Most of the ones I found online resulted in a compound that was way too sticky to work with. So I experimented with different proportions of glue and cornstarch and the inclusion/exclusion of various secondary ingredients. What follows is the fruit of my experimentation. Lucky you!


 

Materials
  • 3/4 cup white glue
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons mineral oil (I used baby oil but reportedly even vaseline will work)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Non-stick pot
  • Wooden spoon
Steps
Add cornstarch to glue in a nonstick pot. Mix together and then add mineral oil and lemon juice. Blend well.


 





Cook over low flame stirring pretty much constantly (you can take a quick break or two if your arm gets tired, which it will) until the mixture resembles mashed potatoes.


 





 
Remove from heat! Squirt a little additional mineral oil around the top of your mashed potato mass and with your hands, remove it from the pot. Knead until smooth. It's best to do this while it's still as hot as you can handle.


 



 
Pull off a bit to work with and put the rest in a re-sealable plastic bag with the top about half-way open until it's cooled down a bit. Then seal the bag (with as little air in it as you can) and store in the fridge.


 
Let dry about 2-3 days, then paint, or not.

Until next time --

Enjoy!

THE PONGAL FESTIVAL!




    Pongal is a harvest festival-the Tamil equivalent of Thanksgiving. In an agriculture based civilization, the harvest plays an important part. The farmer cultivating his land depends on cattle, timely rain and the Sun. Once a year, he expresses his gratitude to these during the harvest festival. With the end of the est month of Margazhi (mid December to mid January) the new Tamil month of Thai heralds a series of festivals. The first day of the month is a festival day known as "Pongal Day". Pongal means the 'boiling over" of milk and rice during the month of Thai.








    The act of boiling over of milk in the clay pot is considered to denote future prosperity for the family. Traditionally celebrated at harvest time, it is a celebration of the prosperity associated with the harvest by thanking the rain, sun and the farm animals that have helped in the harvest. Pongal is celebrated by the Indian state of Tamil Ndu as well as Tamils worldwide, including those in Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Mauitius, South Africa, USA, Canada and Singapore. The festival is at least 1000 years old although some believe that the festival is more that 2000 years old. It used to be celebrated as Puthiyeedu during Medieval Chola empire days. It is thought the Puthiyeedu meant the first harvest of the year. People of all religions celebrate the Pongal festival.








    Tamils refer to Pongal as "Tamizhar Thirunal" (meaning "the festival of Tamils"). This festival originated in Tamil Nadu. The saying "Thai Pirandhal Vazhi Pirakkum" meaning "the birth of the month of Thai will have the way for new opportunities", often is quoted regarding the Pongal festival.
    Usually, the festival takes place January 12th to the 15th (on the Gregorian calandar). The festival is celebrated 4 days from the last day of the Tamil month Maargazhi (December-January) to the third day of Thai (January-February). The first day, Bhogi, is celebrated by throwing away and destroying old clothes and materials, by setting them on fire, marking the end of the old Thai and the emergence of the new Thai.








    The astronomical significance of the festival is that it marks the beginning of Uttarayana, the sun's movement northward for a six month period. Markar Sankranthi refers to the event of the sun entering the zodiac sign of Makara (Capricorn). While Pongal is predominantly a Tamil festival, similar festivals are also celebrated in several other Indian states under different names. In Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, and Karnataka, the harvest festival Sankranthi is celebrated. In northern India, it is called Makara Sankranti. In Maharashtra and Gujarat, it is celebrated on the date of the annual kite flying day, Uttarayah. It also coincides with the bonfire and harvest festval in Punjab and Haryana, known as Lohri. Similar harvest festivals in the same time frame are also celebrated by farmers in Burma, Cambodia, and Korea.