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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 06/13/16

Monday, June 13, 2016

PROCESSION OF THE HOLY BLOOD FROM BELGIUM!!




    The oldest mention of the present procession is to be found in a charter of the Unloaders'Guild (1291). From it we learn that the guilds of Bruges were obliged to participate in the procession. Probably the Holy Blood was exhibited in the chapel on the Burg before 1291. And it is presumably from this custom that the procession originated.
    From 1303 onwards one hears of a Holy Blood procession going round the city walls. Because the relic was town-property the procession was, of course, a civil and an official occasion in which horsemen, guildsmen and artisans, marksmen, city councillors and, naturally, the clergy, in all their splendour march with the relic.







 
    In 1310, Bruges' city council decided to combine the festivities around the Holy Blood, its procession (May 3rd) and the two-week ceremonies, with the annual fair (April 23rd until May 22nd). As a result the numbers of those assisting at the procession and the devotion around the Holy Blood grew.
    In the 15th and 16th centuries, profane scenes with giants, the Ros Bayard with the four sons of Aymon, as also the chambers of rhetoric of the city, were added to the biblical scenes (mystery plays). Due to the religious disturbances in 1578 it was considered safer to cease carrying the relic around outside the city gates. So, for the first time, the procession took place in the city centre and followed the course which, today, it still follows
    Between 1578 and 1584, Bruges had a Calvinist regime. The procession was banned and the relic was taken to a place of safety. At the time of the Counter-revolution (17th century), and also in the 18th century the procession regained its religious character.









    Floats with all kinds of symbols and representations gave it a triumphal aspect. During the French rule, the procession was again abolished (1798-1819), and the relic placed again in safety. In the 19th century the procession was composed of the seven parishes of the city with their numerous brotherhoods, congregations and schools. During the 20th century a variety of changes in the themes and the presentation were made.
    The procession is conceived in a style dating back to Bruges' golden age (15th century), when Bruges was one of the most important harbours north of the Alps, and also a bustling commercial market and residence of the Burgundian dukes. During that period remarkable works of art were produced by the Flemish Primitives
The procession of the Holy Blood tries to answer the questions every man has on the meaning of his own life and on the existence of the world. Everyone wishes to be deeply happy.
    That happiness has different names, according to the cultural background, called by some "Nirvana", by others "Heaven", or, in the biblical tradition :"'The Kingdom of God", "Sion" or "the new Jerusalem".





 

The procession is divided into four parts :

The Old Testament

The old myths tell of existential matters concerning the life of man.


The paradise, the banishment of Adam and Eve, the fratricide :

    The creation was entrusted to man by God. By serving the Creator he preserves and protects creation. He gives names to all creatures and, in doing so, he becomes fellow-creator with God. But man is at the same time good and bad. The greatest sin is the pride from which envy and quarrelling originate. Because evil is rooted in man, he passes his life seeking for happiness, peace and the meaning of his existence. He is looking for lost paradise …

Erring man :

    Invited by God, Abraham departed from his country for a strange, but better land to begin his life anew. Abraham let himself be led by God, in whom he trusted : it's the Covenant of God with his people.

The outcast man becomes the savior:

    Joseph, his father Jacobs' favorite son, was sold by his brothers : since humanity exists, people leave their "brother" behind. Some do not even shrink from killing their kinsmen. Joseph, promoted Pharaoh's adviser, became his brothers' savior when they were driven to Egypt by hunger. In this way, Joseph is the prefiguration of Jesus Christ, who, as outcast, brings new life to humanity.








    Throughout the history prophets appear who bring to our memory Gods' mission and the most fundamental rules of our life, respect of life, justice, love for and trust in God.


The New Testament

    Christ was born in a carpenter's family, in an insignificant spot and it was the simple ones, the shepherds, who first received the joyous message. It means for the searcher after truth that he has to make a complete change in his ideas if he wishes to discover the deepest meaning of life.
    The three kings, three wise men, come to Jesus from different parts of the earth, bringing with them the wisdom of Western, Eastern and African culture in order to attest that Christ is the answer to the question of life's meaning. Later on, the Child Jesus is talking to the teachers with depth and wisdom and He blesses the children because they are holy and receptive for God.
    Jesus Christ gives the answer to the meaning of life









    The same Jesus who is now with jubilation welcomed in Jerusalem will , a few days later be put to death. This shows that man is two-faced. Before his death, during the last meal with his disciples, Jesus delivered them his message of love which in turn they should deliver to the world. Jesus, however, will be betrayed and brought before Pilate.  He is sentenced to death in order to appease the anger of the people.
    After being scourged and crowned with thorns, Jesus climbs up the Golgotha carrying his cross.
    He is the symbol of suffering and at the same time of the everlasting life and of trust in love. The resurrection of Jesus, the central point of the Christian faith, means He is close to all who come to Him and, in doing so, live in joy and in peace.




The relic of the precious blodd and the chapel where it's kept



History

    Preceded by heralds, flags and a band, Count Derrick and his followers came to Bruges in order to hand over the relic as a sign of the new Jerusalem.
They were acclaimed by the people of Bruges, even by the wealthy.


The Veneration of The Holy- Blood

    Ever since the 12th century, the numerous brotherhoods and associations of the city of Bruges venerate and pay homage to the Holy-Blood.
    Still today bishops and prelates, the clergy and the civil authorities in name of the people pay tribute to the relic.







 

The Noble Brotherhood of The Holy-Blood

    The Noble Brotherhood of the Holy Blood was founded shortly after 1400. Its purpose is to safeguard the relic and to further its veneration. Its 31 members must be resident in Bruges and, as an old document puts it, be "honorable people".
    The Provost can be recognized by his rich neckchain. On ceremonial occasions the Brothers wear a black silken tabard on which the pelican with her young is embroidered.








The Relic of The Precious Blood

    For about 750 years the population of Bruges and its neighbourhood faithfully and intensively venerates the relic of the Holy Blood.
    The Noble Brotherhood of the Holy Blood, being aware of the importance attached by the inhabitants of Bruges to their relic, made in the course of centuries every effort to keep up the tradition.







 

    The relic of the Holy Blood is displayed each Friday, before and after the mass, to be venerated by the faithful.
    This age-old practice reaches a peak on Ascension Day : Bishops and prelates carry the shrine in the streets of the city on occasion of a solemn and colourful procession of more than 1800 actors.
    Each year 50.000 pilgrims are present at this original event.






WHY TRYING TO WAIT OUT THE ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE COULD GET YOU KILLED!!




    I want to bring up some alternate methods of thought, that the best way to survive the zombie apocalypse is to stay mobile and not hunker down in a single place. Here's why that it might be true.



A Zombie Apocalypse Isn't Siege Warfare

    Zombie survivalists like to make a parallel between fending off zombies and medieval forms of siege warfare. At first glance, it's easy to see why they might make that comparison: you have an overwhelming mass of combatants outside your gates, but within a well-stocked stronghold, a small number of defenders can hold off almost indefinitely.
    The problem with this idea is that surviving a siege puts faith in the idea that your attackers will eventually get bored or be incapable of feeding or otherwise supplying themselves and will soon stop attacking you.









    We can't assume those things of zombies. Zombies don't get bored. Zombies are always hungry, but hunger won't stop them. They're impervious to disease and they will never revolt or turn on one another. They don't tire, and the chill of winter or the brunt of a storm won't faze them. There's no commander you can kill to demoralize the rest of the group. The only thing that will stop a zombie is a bullet to the head or (if you can hold out long enough), the slow process of bodily decay. And we're even assuming that zombies do decay. What if the zombie virus has some preservative quality that means the walking dead won't atrophy away to wind-scraped bones? Then you're looking at an indefinite period of zombie activity and you will never have enough supplies or ammo to survive an onslaught like that. The zombies may not get you, but you'll starve to death and won't be any better off.









Why Staying Mobile Is a Good Idea

    By staying on the move, you can scavenge supplies as you go, killing zombies when it's advantageous to do so, and running when the numbers are stacked against you. You're also more likely to meet other survivors and be able to band together. It's not an easy lifestyle, and in the long run, it may not give you any better chance of surviving than staying put, but it's a way to take a more active role in your survival.
    You need different skills to survive the zombie apocalypse on the move than you would bunkered down in a stronghold: you need to be in shape and you need to be able to navigate without the aid of modern devices - there's no Mapquest to help you out anymore. You need to be able to scrounge food from the world around you - whether that means hunting and foraging in the wilderness, or scavenging for canned goods in abandoned supermarkets.







    The mobile zombie survivalist has more dangers to face than just zombies: they're exposed to the elements, may have trouble finding clean drinking water, and even a "minor" injury like a sprained ankle from a slip or fall could levy a death sentence if it keeps them from getting to a defensible position before the zombies arrive. Even failing that, being on the run is exhausting, and mobile survivalists may soon find their energy reserves drained when they need them most.
Just in case you wanted to send a letter during the apocalypse



Mix The Two

    When possible, the best survival strategy may be to mix the two: stay on the move until you find a good place to make a stand, defend it for a bit while you rest and recover from your recent journey, but get out and move on before too many zombies accumulate or before your supplies start running low.

JUNE FOOD HOLIDAYS!!


 


Here's a list of the National food holidays for the month of June:







June 1: National Hazelnut Cake Day


June 2: National Rocky Road Ice Cream Day









June 3: National Egg Day

June 4: National Cheese Day

June 4: National Frozen Yogurt Day










June 4: National Cognac Day

June 5: National Gingerbread Day

June 6: National Applesauce Cake Day









June 7: National Chocolate Ice Cream Day

June 8: Jelly-Filled Doughnut Day

June 8: World Oceans Day (Sustainable Seafood)









June 9: National Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie Day

June 10: Herbs & Spices Day

June 10: National Iced Tea Day








June 10: National Black Cow* Day /*A root beer float

June 11: National German Chocolate Cake Day

June 12: International Cachaça Day









June 12: National Peanut Butter Cookie Day

June 13: Kitchen Klutzes of America Day

June 14: National Strawberry Shortcake Day








June 15: National Lobster Day

June 16: National Fudge Day

June 17: Eat All Your Veggies Day









June 17: National Apple Strudel Day

June 18: National Cherry Tart Day

June 18: International Picnic Day






June 19: National Dry Martini Day

June 20: National Vanilla Milkshake Day

June 21: National Peaches and Cream Day








June 22: National Chocolate Éclair Day

June 22: National Onion Rings Day

June 23: National Pecan Sandy Day









June 24: National Pralines Day

June 25: National Strawberry Parfait Day









   On National Almond Butter Crunch Day (June 29), treat yourself to one of the best:
Enstrom’s.

June 26: National Chocolate Pudding Day

June 27: National Indian Pudding Day

June 27: National Orange Blossom Day









June 28: National Tapioca Day

June 29: National Almond Buttercrunch Day







June 30: National Ice Cream Soda Day

NATIONAL HOLIDAYS IN JUNE!








Image result for JUNE








   Father's Day lands in June, but did you know that there is a holiday for every day this month? Here they are!






June 1: National Go Barefoot Day - This shouldn't be too hard to do now that it's June.

June 2: Leave the Office Early Day - Do I need to make up an excuse, or can I just leave?

June 3: Chimborazo Day -Build a science fair-worthy volcano in honor of Chimborazo (in the Andes in Ecuador).

June 4: International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression - It's a long name, but a good cause.







June 5: World Environment Day - Dedicate the day to go green for the world environment. Wait - this should be done every day.

June 6: Drive-in Movie Day - Do they still exist?

June 7: VCR Day - Go back in time by watching home videos on the old VCR.

June 8: Upsy Daisy Day - Every time you royally screw up, say, "Upsy daisy" to lighten the mood.

June 9: Donald Duck Day - Write Mr. Duck's biography to honor him this fine day.





Image result for iced tea
 
 


June 10: Iced Tea Day - It's not just any old iced tea;it's lemonade iced tea!

June 11: Corn on the Cob Day - Go corn picking and cook up some good ol' corn on the cob.

June 12: Loving Day - Dig deep to find a little love in your heart, at least for today.

June 13: Children's Sunday - Let the children plan the day's activities.

June 14: (World) Blood Donor Day - Get over your fear of needles to give some blood today; someday, you may need a blood donor.







June 15: Nature Photography Day - This can be your excuse to get outside and enjoy the outdoors.

June 16: Fudge Day - I think I'm going to celebrate by eating some ice cream topped with fudge.

June 17: Recess at Work Day - Um—at my job, we call it "lunch break".

June 18: Work @ Home Father's Day - This is for all you work at home fathers!

June 19: Garfield the Cat Day - Adopt a kitty and name him Garfield in honor of Garfield the Cat Day.







June 20: Husband Caregiver Day - It's also Father's Day (so who ends up doing the caregiving?).

June 21: World Handshake Day - Everywhere you go, shake the hands of all the people you me

June 22: Stupid Guy Thing Day - Don't take anything your guy does seriously today; after all, it's just a stupid guy thing (hehe).

June 23: Let it Go Day - Guys, you know how yesterday your ladies shrugged everything off as a "stupid guy thing"? Just let it go!

June 24: Celebration of the Senses - Do activities that tickle all your senses.







June 25: Take Your Dog to Work Day - It'll give him/her and you some exercise.

June 26: International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking - It's a serious problem. If you're doing it, quit.

June 27: Decide to Be Married Day - Just make sure your partner agrees first.

June 28: Please Take My Children to Work Day - Please! I'm begging you, get them off my hands.

June 29: Library Advocacy Day - Make up brochures and stand outside the library to advocate it.






June 30: Leap Second Time Adjustment Day - Adjust your clocks for the leap second