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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 09/26/16

Monday, September 26, 2016

TOP 10 FAMILY FRIENDLY HALLOWEEN MOVIES!

  Halloween is just around the corner and with it comes loads of candy, movies, costumes, and fun! Because we already have a list of the top 10 horror movies, we thought it might be a nice idea to do a list of halloween movies that are suitable for all ages – something the kids and adults will both love. I have tried to pick a good balanced selection of movies – not just horror movies, but movies that contain halloween themes: witches, ghosts, and all things spooky. I have intentionally excluded movie series (such as the Harry Potter series) and Halloween versions of popular shows (such as the Spongebob Halloween special). If you haven’t seen any of these movies, you definitely should. Be sure to tell us what movies you will be watching this halloween! This list contains a competition – further details at the bottom of the list.



10.  Hocus Pocus/1993
 
 






    More than 300 years ago, 3 witches were sentenced to die in Salem, Massachusetts and a boy was turned into a cat (a black cat, naturally). Now it’s Halloween, and the witches (who fly on – I kid you not – vacuum cleaners) are back. This time, they’ve got their eyes on immortal life and have turned their wrath on trick-or-treaters and it’s up to the 300-year-old cat to save the day.



9.  Corpse Bride/2005








   When an arranged marriage between Victor Van Dort and Victoria Everglot reaches the rehearsals, Victor starts to worry. Spending time alone in the forest, Victor decides to practice on his own. Everything seems to go well, until he accidentally puts the ring upon the hand of a corpse. Before he knows it, Victor is in the land of dead and now has a corpse bride. Whilst everyones worries about who Victoria will marry in the land of the living, Victor desperately finds a way to get back.



8.  Casper/1995









   Furious that her late father only willed her his gloomy-looking mansion rather than his millions, Carrigan Crittenden (Moriarty) is ready to burn the place to the ground when she discovers a map to a treasure hidden in the house. But when she enters the rickety mansion to seek her claim, she is frightened away by a wicked wave of ghosts. Determined to get her hands on this hidden fortune, she hires afterlife therapist Dr. James Harvey (Pullman) to exorcise the ghosts from the mansion. Harvey and his daugh- ter Kat (Ricci) move in, and soon Kat meets Casper, the ghost of a young boy who’s “the friendliest ghost you know.”



7.  Monsters, Inc./2001









   In a land of monsters, James P. Sullivan is king. He and his coworker/ friend Mike Wazowski are two of many monsters that work for Monsters Inc. a utility company that generates power for a very paranoid and nervous city of monsters. This power, oddly enough, is generated from the screams of children, which is produced by scaring them in their sleep. One night, however, Sully uncovers a devious plot to rid Monster city of it’s power problems, but in all the wrong ways. Together, ironically, Sully and Mike will fight to protect the innocence of the children they scare every night.



6.  The Witches/1990







   A young boy, recently orphaned, is taken to England by his grandmother. At a hotel in which they are staying, a group of witches have gathered to prepare a plot to rid the world of all children. This movie is based on the wonderful book by Roald Dahl and stars Anjelica Huston and Rown Atkinson. This is a film that the kids will definitely love. This film was produced by Jim Henson.


5.  Something Wicked This Way Comes/1983





   In a small anywhere town in any state in America, two young boys- quiet Will Halloway and somewhat rebellious Jim Nightshade-enjoy the ever-shortening days of autumn. When the boys hear about a strange traveling carnival from a lightning rod salesman, they decide to see what it is all about-but Will is fearful, as most carnivals end their tours after Labor Day. When the ominous Mr. Dark, the Illustrated Man, rides into town on a dark midnight, setting up his massive carnival in a matter of seconds, the boys are both thrilled and terrified. A great film by Ray Bradbury.



4.  Pufnstuf/1970





   Originally a television program, the Pufnstuf film was a real gem and has outlived the series. One of the best things about this film is that it stars Mama Cass (Cass Elliot) from the Mamas and the Papas, as Witch Hazel. The show and the film were both notable for bright colors, fast edits, sped-up film, musical segments and pop culture in-jokes, and appealed to young adults almost as much as children. Central to the film is young Jimmy and his magic flute, and a group of wicked witches who want to capture the flute for themselves. The series and movie are named after one other important character, a friendly dragon.



3.  The Nightmare Before Christmas/1993
 
 






   Jack Skellington, the pumpkin king of Halloween Town, is bored with doing the same thing every year for Halloween. One day he stumbles into Christmas Town, and is so taken with the idea of Christmas that he tries to get the resident bats, ghouls, and goblins of Halloween town to help him put on Christmas instead of Halloween — but alas, they can’t get it quite right.



2.  Beetle Juice/1988

 
 





   After Barbara and Adam Maitland were killed in a car crash, they find themselves trapped as ghosts in their beautiful New England farmhouse. Their peace is disrupted when a yuppie family, the Deetzs, buy their house. The Maitlands are too nice and harmless as ghosts and all their efforts to scare the Deetzs away were unsuccessful. They eventually turn to another ghost ‘Beetlejuice’ for help…


1.  Ghost Busters/1984



 
 
 

   Three odd-ball scientists get kicked out of their cushy positions at a university in New York City where they studied the occult. They decide to set up shop in an old firehouse and become Ghostbusters, trapping pesky ghosts, spirits, haunts, and poltergeists for money. They wise-crack their way through the city, and stumble upon a gateway to another dimension, one which will release untold evil upon the city. The Ghostbusters are called on to save the Big Apple. This film is a timeless cult classic.

TOP TEN MAD SCIENTISTS!!


    • Johann Konrad Dippel (1673-1734)Germany

     
  • A fact that few know is that this alchemist and theologian of the seventeenth century, the inventor of one of the first synthetic dyes, he worked in the Castle Frankenstein, near Darmstadt, Germany, not clear whether the writer Mary Shelley was inspired by this character to create her famous novel. The truth is that Dippel spent much of his life in search of an elixir of immortality, and ironically died in the attempt to drink a potion of his invention.


    Jack Parsons (1914-1952)United States


     
  • Rocket propulsion researcher at one of the founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA was also a believer in the occult and black magic practitioner. Part of the success of the space program of the United States is the work of this remarkable self-taught scientist. Friend of the 'wizard', English Alestes Crowley and L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Dianetics. Parson's tragic death in a home lab cemented his legend.


    Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925)England


     
  • It is known as one of the founders of modern theory of electrical circuits and vector analysis in electromagnetism, and his ideas are evident to this day. He almost won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1912. He replaced the furniture in his house with stones of granite, was obsessed with chickens running over his bike, documenting what he ate, so he left detailed accounts in his diaries, he could make bowls and glasses of milk for days, suffering termofilia, fear of not being well covered for the cold. But the most bizarre was that he kept his sister Marry Way as his maid for 7 or 8 years, in a state of virtual slavery.


    Blondlot Rene (1849-1930)France


     
  • Although a respected scientist in his day, especially for his work with electromagnetism, is remembered for having 'discovered' the N-rays, "a new form of radiation that could never be proven and suspected it was a hallucination of his.


    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) Hungarian-US


     
  • Perhaps one of the most important inventors in history for his contribution in the development of the electricity industry (to him we owe the first practical use of the AC). The list of inventions (such as AC power generator, the induction motor, etc.). And ideas generated in life contrasts diametrically with his eccentricities. He never had a permanent home, as he preferred to live in hotel rooms where his demands were quite peculiar: he had a strange case of trifilia, a marked obsession that made him as daily for towels, pates or silverware in multiples of three. He left his hotel 3 times daily to go around the block and counted his steps, and always chose hotel room 207. He also washed his hands all the time, and had a terrible phobia of germs, and also developed an irrational fear of round objects. In addition, he experienced visual and auditory hallucinations. He came to regard pigeons as his only friends.


    Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957) Germany


     
  • A disciple of Freud and one of the reformers of psychoanalysis, his figure and work are still controversial. Although the creator of many theories in the field of psychology, he is remembered, perhaps unfairly, for creating the concept of orgone, a kind of vital energy that could be stored in a device he invented. This led him to prison by order of the Food and Drug Administration of the United States, who considered him mentally unstable. And ordered the burning of many of his books on the subject. He died in prison. Out of this incident, many of his ideas have influenced other creative minds.


    Theodore Kaczynski (born 1942)United States


     
  • With an IQ of 170, this brilliant mathematician specializing in geometric function, a graduate of Harvard. Considered a young genius, he had rather peculiar habits. He suffered a pathological shyness and hated human contact. At a level of living in isolation in a cabin in the word of Montana. He began a campaign of terrorism by the nickname of "Unabomber. He had the authorities on his trail for nearly twenty years.


    Jacques Beveniste (1935-2004)France


     
  • His brilliant career in biology broke down when he published an article establishing the existence of certain elements in the water was suggested that it was biologically "active. His experiments claimed that water was the "memory of substances that had been dissolved in it. He was declared a fraud by the scientific community.


    Bruce Edwards Ivins (1946-2008)United States


     
  • This American microbiologist worked at the Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. In a 2001 bioterrorist attack with anthrax spores, he was one of the main suspects. Ivins committed suicide a few days before the FBI could file charges against him, so his apparent involvement in the events will remain a mystery.



    Trofim Lysenko (1898-1976)Ukraine

  • Under the regime of Stalin, this character led the agricultural science in the former Soviet Union. He claims the concept of Lysenkoism, a campaign against the genetic theory that was maintained for thirty years, arguing that this was contrary to the Marxist concepts and calling it a "bourgeois science". this model is currently interpreted as submission of science to the political interests of the state.

DIY DRYER VENT PUMPKINS, A NICE DECORATION FOR INSIDE THE HOUSE!

  Found this little diy while doing a little web surfing.  Brought to you by www.adiamondinthestuff.blogspot.com .  I hope you enjoy making a few of these for this fall season.  Don't forget to stop by her blog for other useful stuff you might like.


Dryer Vent Pumpkin {Tutorial}




   Last year I made some dryer vent pumpkins. I didn't really post a tutorial and since I was making a bunch more this year I decided to tell you how I did it. It's super duper easy and there are a ton of ways to personalize them to your style.




   I bought two different sizes of dryer vent at Home Depot. They measure 3in and 4in, I only made one size last year but I wanted to add some variety this go around. I cut them using wire cutters and scissors, making sure I had enough length by twisting the vent in a circle and giving a little extra room for gluing.




  I used hot glue to attach the two raw ends of the dryer vent together. Side note: the metal of the dryer vent will get very hot once the hot glue is applied and your pressing it together. Not that I learned that the hard way or anything!!!




   Once they are glued it's painting time. This is where you can change things up to match your style! Want more neutral colors? More vibrant colors? How about metallics??? I used Heirloom White and Real Orange by Rustoleum.




   Once the paint was dry it was time to add a "stem". I used a cinnamon stick and glued it into the center of the pumpkin. You can use a stick from the yard or a cut piece of wood, whatever you fancy! I also added a bit of spanish moss for a little texture and warmth.




I love the orange ones....but I'm totally crushing on the white ones!!!





I love them! I'm bringing a ton to my show on Friday (If you live on the California Central Coast and your interested in attending please let me know!)


40 FACTS AND FEATURES OF VAMPIRES!

     
     
     
  • Many scholars argue the word “vampire” is either from the Hungarian vampir or from the Turkish upior, upper, upyr meaning “witch.” Other scholars argue the term derived from the Greek word “to drink” or from the Greek nosophoros meaning “plague carrier.” It may also derive from the Serbian Bamiiup or the Serbo-Crotian pirati. There are many terms for “vampire” found across cultures, suggesting that vampires are embedded in human consciousness.
  • A group a vampires has variously been called a clutch, brood, coven, pack, or a clan.Probably the most famous vampire of all time, Count Dracula, quoted Deuteronomy 12:23: “The blood is the life.”
  • The Muppet vampire, Count von Count from Sesame Street, is based on actual vampire myth. One way to supposedly deter a vampire is to throw seeds (usually mustard) outside a door or place fishing net outside a window. Vampires are compelled to count the seeds or the holes in the net, delaying them until the sun comes up.
  • Prehistoric stone monuments called “dolmens” have been found over the graves of the dead in northwest Europe. Anthropologists speculate they have been placed over graves to keep vampires from rising.
  • A rare disease called porphyria (also called the "vampire" or "Dracula" disease) causes vampire-like symptoms, such as an extreme sensitivity to sunlight and sometimes hairiness. In extreme cases, teeth might be stained reddish brown, and eventually the patient may go mad.
  • Documented medical disorders that people accused of being a vampire may have suffered from include haematodipsia  which is a sexual thirst for blood, and hemeralopia or day blindness. Anemia (“bloodlessness”) was often mistaken for a symptom of a vampire attack.







  • One of the most famous “true vampires” was Countess Elizabeth Bathory (1560-1614) who was accused of biting the flesh of girls while torturing them and bathing in their blood to retain her youthful beauty. She was by all accounts a very attractive woman.
  • Vampire legends may have been based on Vlad of Walachia, also known as Vlad the Impaler (c. 1431-1476). He had a habit of nailing hats to people’s heads, skinning them alive, and impaling them on upright stakes. He also liked to dip bread into the blood of his enemies and eat it. His name, Vlad, means son of the dragon or Dracula, who has been identified as the historical Dracula. Though Vlad the Impaler was murdered in 1476, his tomb is reported empty.
  • One of the earliest accounts of vampires is found in an ancient Sumerian and Babylonian myth dating to 4,000 B.C. which describes ekimmu or edimmu (one who is snatched away). The ekimmu is a type of uruku or utukku (a spirit or demon) who was not buried properly and has returned as a vengeful spirit to suck the life out of the living.
  • According to the Egyptian text the Pert em Hru (Egyptian Book of the Dead), if the ka (one of the five parts of the soul) does not receive particular offerings, it ventures out of its tomb as a kha to find nourishment, which may include drinking the blood of the living. In addition, the Egyptian goddess Sekhmet was known to drink blood. The ancient fanged goddess Kaliof India also had a powerful desire for blood.
  • Chinese vampires were called a ch’iang shih (corpse-hopper) and had red eyes and crooked claws. They were said to have a strong sexual drive that led them to attack women. As they grew stronger, the ch’iang shih gained the ability to fly, grew long white hair, and could also change into a wolf.
  • While both vampires and zombies generally belong to the “undead,” there are differences between them depending on the mythology from which they emerged. For example, zombies tend to have a lower IQ than vampires, prefer brains and flesh rather than strictly blood, are immune to garlic, most likely have a reflection in the mirror, are based largely in African myth, move more slowly due to rotting muscles, can enter churches, and are not necessarily afraid of fire or sunlight.
  • Vampire hysteria and corpse mutilations to “kill” suspected vampires were so pervasive in Europe during the mid-eighteenth century that some rulers created laws to prevent the unearthing of bodies. In some areas, mass hysteria led to public executions of people believed to be vampires.






  • The first full work of fiction about a vampire in English was John Polidori’s influential The Vampyre, which was published incorrectly under Lord Byron’s name. Polidori (1795-1821) was Byron’s doctor and based his vampire on Byron.f
  • The first vampire movie is supposedly Secrets of House No. 5 in 1912. F.W. Murnau’s silent black-and-white Nosferatu came soon after, in 1922. However, it was Tod Browning’s Draculawith the erotic, charming, cape- and tuxedo-clad aristocrat played by Bela Lugosithat became the hallmark of vampire movies and literature.
  • A vampire supposedly has control over the animal world and can turn into a bat, rat, owl, moth, fox, or wolf.
  • In 2009, a sixteenth-century female skull with a rock wedged in its mouth was found near the remains of plague victims. It was not unusual during that century to shove a rock or brick in the mouth of a suspected vampire to prevent it from feeding on the bodies of other plague victims or attacking the living. Female vampires were also often blamed for spreading the bubonic plague throughout Europe.
  • Joseph Sheridan Le Fany’s gothic 1872 novella about a female vampire, “Carmilla,” is considered the prototype for female and lesbian vampires and greatly influenced Bram Stoker’s own Dracula. In the story, Carmilla is eventually discovered as a vampire and, true to folklore remedies, she is staked in her blood-filled coffin, beheaded, and cremated.
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) remains an enduring influence on vampire mythology and has never gone out of print. Some scholars say it is clearly a Christian allegory; others suggest it contains covert psycho-sexual anxieties reflective of the Victorian era.
  • According to several legends, if someone was bitten by a suspected vampire, he or she should drink the ashes of a burned vampire. To prevent an attack, a person should make bread with the blood of vampire and eat it.







  • Thresholds have historically held significant symbolic value, and a vampire cannot cross a threshold unless invited. The connection between threshold and vampires seems to be a concept of complicity or allowance. Once a commitment is made to allow evil, evil can re-enter at any time.
  • Before Christianity, methods of repelling vampires included garlic, hawthorn branches, rowan trees (later used to make crosses), scattering of seeds, fire, decapitation with a gravedigger’s spade, salt (associated with preservation and purity), iron, bells, a rooster’s crow, peppermint, running water, and burying a suspected vampire at a crossroads. It was also not unusual for a corpse to be buried face down so it would dig down the wrong way and become lost in the earth.
  • After the advent of Christianity, methods of repelling vampires began to include holy water, crucifixes, and Eucharist wafers. These methods were usually not fatal to the vampire, and their effectiveness depended on the belief of the user.
  • Garlic, a traditional vampire repellent, has been used as a form of protection for over 2,000 years. The ancient Egyptians believed garlic was a gift from God, Roman soldiers thought it gave them courage, sailors believed it protected them from shipwreck, and German miners believed it protected them from evil spirits when they went underground. In several cultures, brides carried garlic under their clothes for protection, and cloves of garlic were used to protect people from a wide range of illnesses. Modern-day scientists found that the oil in garlic, allicin, is a highly effective antibiotic.
  • That sunlight can kill vampires seems to be a modern invention, perhaps started by the U.S. government to scare superstitious guerrillas in the Philippines in the 1950s. While sunlight can be used by vampires to kill other vampires, as in Ann Rice’s popular novel Interview with a Vampire, other vampires such as Lord Ruthven and Varney were able to walk in daylight.
  • The legend that vampires must sleep in coffins probably arose from reports of gravediggers and morticians who described corpses suddenly sitting up in their graves or coffins. This eerie phenomenon could be caused by the decomposing process.
  • According to some legends, a vampire may engage in sex with his former wife, which often led to pregnancy. In fact, this belief may have provided a convenient explanation as to why a widow, who was supposed to be celibate, became pregnant. The resulting child was called a gloglave (pl. glog) in Bulgarian or vampirdzii in Turkish. Rather than being ostracized, the child was considered a hero who had powers to slay a vampire.








  • The Twilight book series (Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn) by Stephanie Meyers has also become popular with movie-goers. Meyers admits that she did not research vampire mythology. Indeed, her vampires break tradition in several ways. For example, garlic, holy items, and sunlight do not harm them. Some critics praise the book for capturing teenage feelings of sexual tension and alienation.
  • Hollywood and literary vampires typically deviate from folklore vampires. For example, Hollywood vampires are typically pale, aristocratic, very old, need their native soil, are supernaturally beautiful, and usually need to be bitten to become a vampire. In contrast, folklore vampires (before Bram Stoker) are usually peasants, recently dead, initially appear as shapeless “bags of blood,” do not need their native soil, and are often cremated with or without being staked.
  • Folklore vampires can become vampires not only through a bite, but also if they were once a werewolf, practiced sorcery, were excommunicated, committed suicide, were an illegitimate child of parents who were illegitimate, or were still born or died before baptism. In addition, anyone who has eaten the flesh of a sheep killed by a wolf, was a seventh son, was the child of a pregnant woman who was looked upon by a vampire, was a nun who stepped over an unburied body, had teeth when they were born, or had a cat jump on their corpse before being buried could also turn into vampires.
  • In vampire folklore, a vampire initially emerges as a soft blurry shape with no bones. He was “bags of blood” with red, glowing eyes and, instead of a nose, had a sharp snout that he sucked blood with. If he could survive for 40 days, he would then develop bones and a body and become much more dangerous and difficult to kill.
  • While blood drinking isn’t enough to define a vampire, it is an overwhelming feature. In some cultures, drinking the blood of a victim allowed the drinker to absorb their victim’s strength, take on an animal’s quality, or even make a woman more fecund. The color red is also involved in many vampire rituals.
  • In some vampire folktales, vampires can marry and move to another city where they take up jobs suitable for vampires, such as butchers, barbers, and tailors. That they become butchers may be based on the analogy that butchers are a descendants of the “sacrificer."
  • Certain regions in the Balkans believed that fruit, such as pumpkins or watermelons, would become vampires if they were left out longer than 10 days or not consumed by Christmas. Vampire pumpkins or watermelons generally were not feared because they do not have teeth. A drop of blood on a fruit's skin is a sign that it is about to turn into a vampire.







  • Mermaids can also be vampires—but instead of sucking blood, they suck out the breath of their victims.
  • By the end of the twentieth century, over 300 motion pictures were made about vampires, and over 100 of them featured Dracula. Over 1,000 vampire novels were published, most within the past 25 years.
  • The most popular vampire in children’s fiction in recent years had been Bunnicula, the cute little rabbit that lives a happy existence as a vegetarian vampire.
  • Some historians argue that Prince Charles is a direct descendant of the Vlad the Impaler, the son of Vlad Dracula.
  • The best known recent development of vampire mythology is Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spin-off, Angel. Buffy is interesting because it contemporizes vampirism in the very real, twentieth-century world of a teenager vampire slayer played by Sarah Michelle Gellar and her “Scooby gang.” It is also notable because the show has led to the creation of “Buffy Studies” in academia.