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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 10/28/16

Friday, October 28, 2016

HISTORY AND TRADITIONS OF TRICK OR TREATING!



 
 
 
 

 Trick-or-treating is a customary practice for children on Halloween seen in many countries. Children in costumes, either in large groups or accompanied by an adult, travel from house to house in order to ask for treats such as candy (or, in some cultures, money) with the question "Trick or treat?". The "trick" is a (usually idle) threat to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given.
   In North America, trick-or-treating has been a customary Halloween tradition since at least the late 1950s. Homeowners wishing to participate in it usually decorate their private entrance with plastic spiderwebs, paper skeletons and jack-o-lanterns. Some rather reluctant homeowners would simply leave the candy in pots on the porch, others might be more participative and would even ask an effort from the children in order to provide them with candy. In the more recent years, however, the practice has spread to almost any house within a neighborhood being visited by children, including senior residences and condominiums.
   The tradition of going from door to door receiving food already existed in Great Britain and Ireland in the form of souling, where children and poor people would sing and say prayers for the dead in return for cakes.  Guising — children disguised in costumes going from door to door for food and coins — also predates trick or treat, and is recorded in Scotland at Halloween in 1895, where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit








and money.   While going from door to door in disguise has remained popular among Scots and Irish, the North American custom of saying "trick or treat" has recently become common. The activity is prevalent in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Puerto Rico, and northwestern and central Mexico. In the latter, this practice is called calaverita (Spanish for "little skull"), and instead of "trick or treat", the children ask ¿me da mi calaverita? ("can you give me my little skull?"); where a calaverita is a small skull made of sugar or chocolate.


History

   The practice of dressing up in costumes and begging door to door for treats on holidays dates back to the Middle Ages and includes Christmas wassailing. Trick-or-treating resembles the late medieval practice of souling, when poor folk would go door to door on Hallowmas (November 1), receiving food in return for prayers for the dead on All Souls Day (November 2). It originated in Ireland and Britain,  although similar practices for the souls of the dead were found as far south as Italy.   Shakespeare mentions the practice in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593), when Speed accuses his master of "puling [whimpering or whining] like a beggar at Hallowmas."The custom of wearing costumes and masks at Halloween goes back to Celtic traditions of attempting to copy the evil spirits or placate them, in Scotland for instance where the dead were impersonated by young men with masked, veiled or blackened faces, dressed in white.








   Guising at Halloween in Scotland is recorded in 1895, where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit and money.  The practise of Guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.
   American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book length history of the holiday in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America";
The taste in Hallowe'en festivities now is to study old traditions, and hold a Scotch party, using Burn's poem Hallowe'en as a guide; or to go a-souling as the English used. In short, no custom that was once honored at Hallowe'en is out of fashion now.
Kelley lived in Lynn, Massachusetts, a town with 4,500 Irish immigrants, 1,900 English immigrants, and 700 Scottish immigrants in 1920.  In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Hallowe'en customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".








   While the first reference to "guising" in North America occurs in 1911, another reference to ritual begging on Halloween appears, place unknown, in 1915, with a third reference in Chicago in 1920.
The earliest known use in print of the term "trick or treat" appears in 1927, from Blackie, Alberta:
Hallowe’en provided an opportunity for real strenuous fun. No real damage was done except to the temper of some who had to hunt for wagon wheels, gates, wagons, barrels, etc., much of which decorated the front street. The youthful tormentors were at back door and front demanding edible plunder by the word “trick or treat” to which the inmates gladly responded and sent the robbers away rejoicing.
   The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but do not depict trick-or-treating.  The editor of a collection of over 3,000 vintage Halloween postcards writes, "There are cards which mention the custom [of trick-or-treating] or show children in costumes at the doors, but as far as we can tell they were printed later than the 1920s and more than likely even the 1930s. Tricksters of various sorts are shown on the early postcards, but not the means of appeasing them".   Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first U.S. appearances of the term in 1934, and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.









Increased Popularity

   Almost all pre-1940 uses of the term "trick-or-treat" are from the western United States and Canada.   Trick-or-treating spread from the western United States eastward, stalled by sugar rationing that began in April 1942 during World War II and did not end until June 1947.
   Early national attention to trick-or-treating was given in October 1947 issues of the children's magazines Jack and Jill and Children's Activities,  and by Halloween episodes of the network radio programs The Baby Snooks Show in 1946 and The Jack Benny Show and The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet in 1948.  Trick-or-treating was depicted in the Peanuts comic strip in 1951.   The custom had become firmly established in popular culture by 1952, when Walt Disney portrayed it in the cartoon Trick or Treat, and Ozzie and Harriet were besieged by trick-or-treaters on an episode of their television show.   In 1953 UNICEF first conducted a national campaign for children to raise funds for the charity while trick-or-treating.








   Although some popular histories of Halloween have characterized trick-or-treating as an adult invention to rechannel Halloween activities away from vandalism, there is very little records supporting it. Des Moines, Iowa is the only area known to have record of trick-or-treating being used to deter crime.  Elsewhere, adults, as reported in newspapers from the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s, typically saw it as a form of extortion, with reactions ranging from bemused indulgence to anger.   Likewise, as portrayed on radio shows, children would have to explain what trick-or-treating was to puzzled adults, and not the other way around. Sometimes even the children protested: for Halloween 1948, members of the Madison Square Boys Club in New York City carried a parade banner that read "American Boys Don't Beg." The National Confectioners Association reported in 2005 that 80 percent of adults in the United States planned to give out confectionery to trick-or-treaters,  and that 93 percent of children, teenagers, and young adults planned to go trick-or-treating or participating in other Halloween activities.   In 2008,








Halloween candy, costumes and other related products accounted for $5.77 billion in revenue.

 Introduction to the UK and Ireland

   Before the 1980s, the North American phrase "trick-or-treat" was little known in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland and when introduced was often regarded as an unusual and even unwelcome import. Guising is devoid of any jocular threat.   Since the 80s usage of the phrase has become more widespread, but is still often viewed as an exotic and unwelcome commercialised import, with the BBC referring to it as "the Japanese knotweed of festivals" and "Making demands with menaces".   Very often, the phrase "trick - or - treat" is simply said and the revellers are given sweets, with the choice of a trick or a treat having been largely discarded.

Local variants

Guising

   In Scotland and Ireland, "guising" — children going from house to house in disguise — is traditional, and a gift in the form of food, coins or "apples or nuts for the Halloween party" (in more recent times chocolate) is given out to the children dressed up in various costumes.   The tradition is called "guising" because of the disguises or costumes worn by the children.   Among the earliest record of Guising at Halloween in Scotland is in 1895, where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit and money.   Guising also involved going to wealthy homes, and in the 1920s, boys went guising at








Halloween up to the affluent Thorntonhall, South Lanarkshire.   An account of guising in the 1950s in Ardrossan, North Ayrshire, records a child receiving 12 shillings and sixpence having knocked on doors throughout the neighborhood and performed.   There is a significant difference from the way the practice has developed in North America with the jocular threat. In Scotland and Ireland, the children are only supposed to receive treats if they perform for the households they go to. This normally takes the form of singing a song or reciting a joke or a funny poem which the child has memorized before setting out.   Occasionally a more talented child may do card tricks, play the mouth organ, or something even more impressive, but most children will earn plenty of treats even with something very simple. Often they won't even need to perform.   While going from door to door in disguise has remained popular among Scots and Irish at Halloween, saying "trick-or-treat" has become common.

Trunk-or-Treat

    Some organizations around the US sponsor a "Trunk-or-Treat" on Halloween night (or on occasion, a day immediately preceding Halloween), where trick-or-treating is done from parked car to parked car in a local parking lot, often at a church house. The trunk of one's car is opened, displaying candy and often decorations. Concerned parents see it as safer for their children, while other parents see it as a way out of having to walk the neighborhood with their kids. Opponents frown upon the Trunk-or-Treat as taking away from the tradition of walking door-to-door on Halloween, and also excluding children that do not belong to these church groups and thus are not informed about them. Some have called for more city- or community group-sponsored Trunk-or-Treats, so they can be more inclusive.   Many neighborhoods see a large reduction in








door-to-door trick-or-treating because of a competing Trunk-or-Treat. These have become increasingly popular over the years especially in conservative states like Utah, and are catching on around Midwest and Southern states. This practice is not a panacea for all perceived problems, however. In 2005 a child in Lehi, Utah was given a vial of cocaine at a Trunk-or-Treat.

 Other Trick or Treat Traditions

   In some parts of Canada, children sometimes say "Halloween apples" instead of "trick or treat." This probably originated when the toffee apple was a popular type of candy. Apple-giving in much of Canada, however, has been taboo since the 1960s when stories (almost certainly apocryphal) appeared of razors hidden inside Halloween apples; parents began to check over their children's "loot" for safety before allowing them to eat it. In Quebec, children also go door to door on Halloween. However, in French speaking neighbourhoods, instead of "Trick or treat?", they will simply say "Halloween", though in tradition it used to be La charité s'il-vous-plaît ("Charity, please").
   In some parts of Ohio, Iowa, Massachusetts and other states, the night designated for trick-or-treating is referred to as Beggars Night, and in some communities it is held on a night prior to Halloween itself.









   In Sweden children dress up as witches and go trick-or-treating on Maundy Thursday (the Thursday before Easter) while Danish children dress up in various attires and go trick-or-treating on Fastelavn (or the next day, Shrove Monday). In Norway, children go trick-or-treating between Christmas and New Year's Eve. The Easter witch tradition is done on Palm Sunday in Finland. In parts of Flanders and some parts of the Netherlands and most areas of Germany and Austria, children go to houses with home made beet lanterns or with paper lanterns (which can hold a candle or electronic light), singing songs about St. Martin on St. Martin's Day (the 11th of November), in return for treats.   In Northern Germany and Southern Denmark children dress up in costumes and go trick-or-treating on New Year's Eve in a tradition called "Rummelpott".
   Children of the St. Louis, Missouri area are expected to perform a joke, usually a simple Halloween-themed pun or riddle, before receiving any candy; this "trick" earns the "treat".  Children in Des Moines, Iowa also tell jokes or otherwise perform before receiving their treat. This originated as well-organized campaign to reduce Halloween mischief-making. Des Moines trick-or-treating is also unusual in that it is actually done the night before Halloween, known locally as "Beggars' Night".

SPIRITS FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE!! I SUMMON YOU WITH MY DIY CRYSTAL BALL!!

 This diy was found at www.lifeartcollide.blogspot.ie .   This was another cool and wonderful element to add to your indoor Halloween decor.  Especially, it could be the centerpiece of your kitchen table, with a matt black table cloth.  Happy Haunting!




DIY Crystal Ball









GATHER YOUR SUPPLIES

GLASS CANDY DISH on a metal pedestal, no plastic parts as this will be going in the oven! Works best if the dish has a lip around the top, more visible in the pictures below. I found my dish at a garage sale missing the top and covered in dust, oh the possibilities!!

GLASS GLOBE - NECKLESS TYPE - only the globe not the entire lamp kit. The neckless type will sit level in the dish.The globes also come in clear, none in stock...darn! Picked mine up at Lowes - $8.99.








BLACK SCULPEY - 8 oz. (227 g) block - I purchase my Sculpey at Michaels









WHITE GLUE - WELDBOND - I use Weldbond as it stands up to the heat of the oven.








PEARL-EX in Aztec Gold - again I get mine at Michaels









GLITTER GEM STICKERS - I buy mine at the Dollar Store.








DANGLING EARRINGS - I buy mine at, where else, the Dollar Store.








LIGHT/S - I used a battery powered LED light like the one shown below. Just remove the globe, flick on the LED light and replace the globe...easy!










THE HOW TO'S:


1. Apply a 1/8 in thick x (however wide your dish dictates) strip of black Sculpey around the edge of the dish. **Apply a little Weldbond to the dish where the Sculpey is applied. Lightly press Sculpey into place.














2. Cut out leaves from black Sculpey, add veining and dust with gold Pearlex. Don't apply the Pearlex to the area of the leave that will attach to the black strip going around the edge of the candy dish or it won't adhere.













3. Apply the leaves to the edge of the dish pressing firmly into place. Apply more Pearlex to the band ensursing that all the black Sculpey is covered. Poke a small hole 1/4" from the end of each leaf big enough for the wire on the earrings to fit through.












4. When you're happy with your design, place the entire dish in the oven and bake according to the directions on the Sculpey package.












5. When the dish is baked and cured add a few glitter gems and hang the earrings from the leaves.
place your LED light in the bottom of the dish, replace the glass globe and get ready to tell a few fortunes!!





FOUND THESE WITCHES SHOES JUST LAYING AROUND AND THOUGHT THEY WOULD BE A GREAT DIY!!

  This diy come from www.craftysisters-nc.blogspot.com.  They looked really cool, even for a guy like me. Good luck on this great Halloween craft!




We have a soft spot for anything Halloween,
and it's pretty obvious we have a fetish for Witch shoes too!
If you have wanted to try your hand at decoupaging




there are some great tips you want to take a peek at!
This project is pretty simple and unlimited for your imagination!





We knew we loved witch shoes...
but there's something about those socks that are so funny!



You will need some witch shoes cut from 3/4" MDF or pine,
a 22" section of 2x4" wood,
Mod Podge, scrapbook paper and embellishments.
We grabbed our paper from Hobby Lobby and used K&Company,
which by far has the cutest Halloween paper that we love!
First we drew up some styles we really liked
and sized them to fit together.
We don't have a clue how to do free printables-
but feel free to blow up these pictures on your computer screen
and trace away!:)




These shoes range from 6"-9" tall and about 6" wide.
Ideally you'll need a scroll saw to cut these babies out.
They aren't hard to cut out, I promise!






Second, you'll need to base coat them with a coat of paint.
We always do a 2/1 ratio of paint with water.
The water helps the paint go on smoother with no globs.






Third, trace your shoe shapes right side down with pencil
and cut out each shape. It's okay to leave a little overhang
which you'll next sand off.






For the sock we cut strips of colored paper and glued them onto white card stock
to create the perfect witch sock.
Another little tip~make sure to pre-cut your "sock" to the edge of the shoe.
That way you won't have a weird bump overhang that you glued over.






Using a very thin coat of Mod Podge, adhere your paper into place.
If you put it on too thick your paper will buckle.
Make sure to rub it all over and especially along the edges to ensure good contact!






Now it's time to sand the edges off!
This is what gives the shoes a painted on look!
You can pick up inexpensive files at your local hardware store for just a couple of bucks
and they are a must for these curly shoes!
You can also use a nail file to get in those tiny spaces.






We cut our lettering out with our Cricut
but you can write it on with a paint pen easily too!
We used Mod Podge to adhere the lettering to the board.



Now here's the fun part!
Tie on any and all embellishments to your heart's desire!
You seriously can't go wrong with these!
We even drilled some holes to lace up which was easy and fun.






Need some buckles?
We cut ours out of scrap cardboard and then glittered them
That stuff is gorgeous!
We even added some to the spider for pop.

Then just wood glue your shoes into place and
you've got a fabulous Witch Shoe centerpiece anyone would envy,
cuz ya know.....It's All About The Shoes!



Make sure to check out all the other great Halloween ideas

DIY FANGED PUMPKINS TO MAKE!!








 
   Grouped together on the mantel, Drac-o'-lantern and pals create a Transylvanian scene. Run-of-the-mill pushpins turn into devilish red eyes. I found these on www.marthastewart.com .  Enjoy making these from real pumpkins or if you want them year after year, use the small fake ones.

Tools and Materials

Thumbtack or pin
Small white pumpkin (For a big bite, choose a small pumpkin so the plastic vampire teeth seem huge)
Miniature saw
Plastic vampire teeth
Small red map tacks



 
 
 
  1. Print mouth template. Lay template on pumpkin, and poke thumbtack through, all along outline, to transfer design. Cut out with saw; remove excess flesh.
  2. Wedge teeth into hole.
  3. For eyes, pin map tacks onto pumpkin.
  4. Fangs, partycity.com. Map pins, 1/8 inch, in Red; latitudesmapstore.net.

MAKE SOME NIGHTSHADE BLACK AND BLOOD RED CANDY APPLES FOR YOUR NEXT HALLOWEEN OR FALL PARTY!

   Here's another nice find while surfing for holiday ideas.  Wouldn't these be great at a teen Halloween party or even as a nice offering at an adult party.  Brought to you by www.mattbites.com .  The black and red play off each other and look so cool together with the actual sticks from a tree.  Good luck and enjoy making these, let me know how they turned out for you.

Adam’s Scary Apples


 
spooky-apples



   Full confession: When I was about 4 or 5 years old I was so utterly terrified of Halloween that I once ran from the dinner table to the bedroom where I locked myself inside it for 20 minutes while Trick or Treaters came to the front door of the house. I’m not sure why I did that exactly as I wasn’t normally a timid or shy child; I think my dramatic exit had more to do with the fact that I enjoyed that sense of fright, darkness and mystery that rolls around every October. I like to be scared when I know nothing bad will actually happen.
   This explains my interest in fright nights, scary movies, haunted houses, macabre scenarios, you name it. I think there’s a part of all of us that likes that thrill…why else would we visit haunted houses, watch slasher films, and listen to Paris Hilton songs and videos?
   Not that I’ve done the latter. Even that’s too scary for me.
   When I mentioned to Adam that I wanted to do my first Halloween blog post about a cocktail I tried he quickly informed me that it would neither be a) exciting b) deep enough or c) have enough pizazz. “What’s so exciting about a cocktail, all by itself?” he asked. I could see his point as there are tons of others who focus on spirits and do a much better job. Besides, this drink wasn’t anything exciting or thrilling but perfect for the grown-ups at any Halloween party. “Give me a few minutes and I’ll help you out” said Adam.
   Wow. Was my drink really that lackluster that it needed help? Apparently so.
He grabbed his car keys, ran to the store, came back but not before making a detour to the front yard where he began tugging at one of the trees. My partner isn’t a man of a thousand words (which must be why we’re a great match) but sometimes stoic and methodical. He was up to something I could tell but I didn’t quite know what. When he returned to the kitchen he ransacked his baking shelf, took out the candy thermometer, a sheet pan and began his kitchen alchemy.
What happened next was pure magic.
   I walked back into the kitchen to find the most beautiful candied apples before me. Black glossy cinnamon-scented candied glass enveloped small apples, twigs became their handles, and a few shockingly red candied apples only made their black counterparts more ominous. It was halloween on a silpat, a spooky forest that completed my cocktail.




drinks-and-apples



   I had no choice but to have him bundle up the apples, head to the studio with me where I knew exactly how I wanted to photograph them. They joined my new favorite black wine goblets from Juliska in an eery still life that still gives me the chills when I look at it. Only this time there’s no need to lock myself in my bedroom.


Red &  Black Candy Apples

8-10 medium sized apples
8-10 wooden twigs, twimmed
3 cups granulated sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1 cup of water
several drops of cinnamon flavored oil
1/4 teaspoon of red food coloring
1/4 teaspoon of black food coloring


   Clean and dry the apples. Try to remove as much of the wax as possible. If you purchase them from your local farmer’s market then chances are they have not been treated with the food grade wax that makes then shine. Remove any stems or leaves and insert a twig into the end of each apple. To facilitate easier twig entry you can carefully sharpen the end of the twig or use a candy stick to create a guide hole. Set apples aside.
Heat and stir sugar, corn syrup and water in a saucepan until sugar has dissolved. Boil until the syrup reaches 300 degrees on a candy thermometer. Don’t go over 310 degrees or your candy burns and then you’ll be sad.
   Remove from heat and stir in flavored oil and food coloring.
   Dip one apple completely in the syrup and swirl it so that it becomes coated with the melted sugar candy. Hold the apple above the saucepan to drain off excess. Place apple, with the stick facing up, onto a baking sheet that’s greased or lined with a silpat. Repeat the process with the remaining apples. If your syrup thickens or cools too much, simply reheat briefly before proceeding. Let the apples cool completely before serving.
A note about the black apples: Lighter colored apples (Granny Smith, Golden Delicious) work well in making the red appear bright and glassy; darker apples like red delicious help the black candy appear as dark as possible. Muy spooky!
Also, Adam made one batch with red food coloring and after he had a few red apples he reheated the candy mixture and added black food coloring. Adding black to red will make it darker. He repeated the dipping process. Black food coloring can be found online or at specialty baking stores.