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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 02/09/17

Thursday, February 9, 2017

DIY VALENTINE ORNAMENT WREATH!





This diy comes from www.mommyisacoocoo.blogspot.com .  Something to do with those extra ornament left over from Christmas.  Enjoy!

 

How to make a Valentine Ornament Wreath

Did you go out and buy a bunch of ornaments at 50% off after Christmas? I hope so because there is no need to wait until next Christmas to have some ornament loveliness in your home!


~ My Valentine Ornament Wreath ~


 
 
 

Here is what you need:

  1. a glass of wine (if you are anal and will worry about bulb placement)
  2. a plastifoam wreath (DON'T buy floral foam) shaped like a heart
  3. glue sticks and a glue gun
  4. spray paint (to color the foam wreath). I used red. Use whatever color you like best.
  5. about a million ornaments (different {Valentine} colors and sizes work best).
  6. spray on glitter (usually $5.99 at craft stores or $1.00 if you buy body glitter left over from Halloween
  7. a small piece of ribbon to hang your wreath


Spray paint your foam wreath. You can use whatever color you like but keep in mind some paint will show between your bulbs.
 
 
 




~ my large bulbs ~




~ my smaller bulbs ~


* small bulbs are essential to fill in the gaps



Now, it is pretty similar to the Christmas Ornament Wreath Tutorial. Place your bulbs on the inside of the heart wreath. (Don't use your favorite bulbs on this part a lot of these bulbs will be covered up.) After you have placed your bulbs, use your glue gun to secure them in place. You will glue each bulb to the wreath AND, to the next bulb in place.
 
 
 






Repeat this process for the outside of the wreath. Use the same size bulbs all the way around the outside of the wreathUse sturdier (not vintage-they break really easily) bulbs on the outside. (Again, don't use your favorite bulbs here).



 


 
 
 

Now you are ready to start placing your favorite bulbs (I find it is best to do this in the evening while you have {at least} a glass of wine. If you are anal {me} and tend to over think things {also me} you will have a hard time figuring out where the bulbs should go). Don't over think it! Place a few bulbs (not worrying about small gaps) and then glue them in place. You can fill in gaps with smaller bulbs at the end. When you finish placing all your bulbs weave your ribbon through, take two Tylenol and go to bed.
 
 
 




Finally, spray your wreath glitter. This will really make it shine!

*Store your wreath at room temperature! Otherwise your glue will expand/contract and the bulbs will fall off and (possibly) break.


~ Happy Valentines Day! ~








UNITED STATES NATIONAL TOBOGGAN CHAMPIONSHIPS!



 



    The U.S. National Tobaggan Championships is the only organized wooden toboggan race in the country and possibly the world. The toboggan chute is located in Camden, Main at the Camden Snow Bowl, a community owned year round recreation area which has developed thousand of deicated skiers since 1936. All race revenue goes to off setting the Snow Bowl budget.









History

    The original chute was first built in 1936 by a dedicated group of volunteers who also built a ski lodge and ski hill, one of the earliest in America. The chute was again rebuilt in 1954 by local Coast Guardsmen and lasted until 1964 when it was brought to an end because of rot and neglect.
    In 1990 it was resurrected once again out of pressure treated wood by another enthusiastic group of volunteers and material donors and was to become known as the Jack Williams Toboggan Chute. The week before the race, many hours are spent during the dark of night, when it is the coldest, to coat the wooden chute with layer upon layer of ice. This is accomplished by a "Rube Goldberg" invention of David Dickeys, which pulleys a tub up the chute slowly dispensing water from holes in its back.










 

    The chute is 400 feet long, and with the 70 foot high hill, toboggans can reach speeds of up to 40 miles per hour. The run out is on to frozen Hosmers' pond. If there is clear ice on the pond, some sleds will go the entire way across the pond ( over 1/4 of a mile).
The Nationals are usually held the first weekend of February, but to avoid conflict with the Super Bowl, the event has been changed to the 2nd weekend in February starting in 2008.






PANCAKE DAY, A TAIL OF TWO CITIES FROM DIFFERENT CONTINENTS!!










   Many people are familiar with Mardi Gras celebrations on the day before Lent.  But in Liberal Kansas, the day before Lent means just one thing....it's Pancake Day!
   The friendly little competition between Liberal Kansas and Olney England, with women running down the streets of each town flipping pancakes, has been going on for more that 60 years.  It is still the only race of its kind in the world.
   On Shrove Tuesday, at 11:55 p.m. the race begins, with the overall score standing at 33 wins for Liberal and 25 for Olney.  In 1980 the score didn't count because a media truck blocked the finish line in Olney.










   It all started in 1950 from a magazine picture of the Olney women racing each other to the church.  Liberal Jaycee President R.J. Leete contacted the Reverand Ronald Collins, Vicar of St. Peter and St. Paul's church in Olney, challenging their women to race against women of Liberal
   In Olney, the Pancake Race traditions date back more than 500 years to 1445.  A woman engrossed in using up cooking fats (forbidden during Lent) was making pancakes.  Hearing the church bells ring calling everyone to the shriving service, she grabbed her head scarf (required in church) and ran to the church, skillet and pancake in hand and still apron clad.  In following years, neighbors got into the act and it became a race to see who could reach he church first and collect a "Kiss of Peace" from the verger ( bell ringer).  The kiss is still the traditional prize in both races.











   Racers must still wear a head scarf and apron and the runner must flip her pancake at the starting signal, and again after crossing the finish line, to prove she still has her pancake.
   Winning scores have traded back and forth between the two towns.  The record time was set in 2001 when 3 time winner, Lisa Spillman of Liberal, ran the 415 yard S -shaped course in 58.1 seconds.












    International Pancake Day in Liberal has expanded into a 4 day event, beginning with pancake eating and flipping contests, a cooking contest, and a parade.  Other events include a talent show, an authentic English High Tea, the pancake races, and a shroving service.

TOP SELLING CANDIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD!



  You wouldn't wear the same food costume every Halloween — so why trick-or-treat with the same candy? This year, try something new. If you're already well-versed in the categories of movie treats and nostalgic candies, then consider serving various candies from around the world. Need a bit of an education in global candy culture? Then test your knowledge of the world's candies and check out some of our favorites here.




Bounty, United Kingdom


Bounty, United Kingdom

   Mounds lovers will appreciate Bounty, a coconut-filled bar enrobed with milk chocolate.




Botan Rice Candy, Japan

 

Botan Rice Candy, Japan

   Even if you've never been to Japan, you may have come across Botan Rice Candy in Asian supermarkets. Botan, which means "peony," is a prominent brand in Japan and makes a sticky rice candy with a slightly citrusy flavor.




ToffeeCrisp, United Kingdom

 

ToffeeCrisp, United Kingdom

   NestlĂ© makes a number of chocolate bars in Europe that aren't readily available in the United States. One of them is ToffeeCrisp, a staple in the United Kingdom. The long, slender milk chocolate bar is filled with crackling puffed rice and caramel. Its motto? "Somebody, somewhere, is eating a ToffeeCrisp."




Cheong Woo, Korea

 

Cheong Woo, Korea

   Leave it to South Korea to come up with pumpkin candy — a mellow, slightly salty candy with a prominent squash-like flavor and the texture of Starburst. If you can track it down, it's perfect for this time of year.




Kinder Country, Germany

 

Kinder Country, Germany

   I wasn't sure what to make of Kinder Country, which was described on the wrapper as "milk chocolate with rich milk filling." It was unlike anything I'd ever had in the States: a creamy, milky white center, made crunchy with puffed rice and then doused in milk chocolate.





Lion, United Kingdom

 

Lion, United Kingdom

   I was really happy to bite into a Lion Bar, another chocolate confection that hails from the UK. It was similar to a ToffeeCrisp, with caramel, crisp cereal, and a wafer enrobed in milk chocolate and reminded me of an even heartier 100 Grand. This lion was one of my top candy picks and definitely made me roar.




Baci, Italy

 

Baci, Italy

   Hershey's isn't the only one with kisses — Italy has its own version, Perugina's Baci. These chocolate bonbons are filled with hazelnut chocolate cream, topped with a whole hazelnut, and wrapped in a love note.




Peko Milky Candy, Japan

 

Peko Milky Candy, Japan

   Peko-chan Milk Candy is commonplace among children in Japan. The individually-wrapped candies are firm yet chewy and have a distinctive sweet milk flavor.





Yorkie, United Kingdom


Yorkie, United Kingdom

   The Yorkie bar — originally titled so because it was made by Rowntrees of York — was created in the 1970s as a larger chocolate bar alternative to Cadbury's Dairy-Milk. To this day, the chocolate stays true to its original branding with the slogan, "It's not for girls!"





Chimes Mango Ginger Chews, Indonesia

 

Chimes Mango Ginger Chews, Indonesia

   I'd never heard of Chimes Mango Ginger Chews before, but these individually-wrapped Indonesian ginger candies in the quaint tin turned out to be my favorite. They had a latent heat and spiciness to them, thanks to ginger that's grown on volcanic soil in East Java.