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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S

Friday, September 30, 2016

THE ULTIMATE ZOMBIE SURVIVORS GUIDE INFOGRAPHIC!!..........YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT!!!!

This is a Public Service Announcement!!

    In the face of an imminent Zombie Apocalypse, we strongly advise you to read the infographic below. This is not a test…. (Cue radio static, sinister organ music, and occasional shrieks.)
   Worldwide Medical Insurance has put together this entertaining infographic for any zombie fans out there (or any with Kinemortophobia, fear of the undead), just in time for Halloween. You can never be too prepared, after all. First and foremost, know your enemy, whether the hemorrhaging zombie mob is made up of undead cheerleaders, jocks, clowns or nurses. Second, know your body and the very unfortunate results of a zombie bite. Lastly, know your resources and put together the kit every doomed horror-move heroine wishes she had.





Guide to Zombie Survival Infographic

HAUNTED NAVY SHIPS!!








  There has always been a lot of debate in both the scientific and the supernatural realm with regard to what actually constitutes a ghost. Some believe that they are souls that haven't, for some reason, crossed over to the other side. Those believing in this theory suspect that there is something that the dead left unfinished in life. Therefore, they can't cross over until they finish whatever their task.
    Others believe that someone holds them back, not allowing them to cross over. It could be a loved one who can't let go of them, or it might be an enemy who seeks to block them from paradise.
    Some believe that ghosts are nothing more than residual energy left behind at a place where something tragic occurred. They call it a "loop" in time and space that replays the incident over and over again.
    Both theories have some credibility. It wouldn't be unnatural for any one to want to complete their purpose in life. It also makes sense that those who die a tragic death might leave behind some residual energy that is locked up in the place where the event occurred.
    In the case of naval ship hauntings, the second theory would most likely apply. In most instances, the ships in question had not experienced any paranormal activity prior to the tragic event that jump-started it. Such is the case with the following:






U.S.S. Hornet





The USS Hornet

   Many ships have held the name of the Hornet, but it is the eighth in a long line of colorful and heroic ships by that name, that seems to bear witness to ghost stories. Many sailors lost their life aboard her. Some were, of course, as a result of battle. Others, however, were the result of other types of tragedy.
    Accidents aren't uncommon aboard naval carriers, but it does seem odd that the Hornet experienced more than her fair share. Sailors were sucked into air intakes, blown of the deck by aircraft exhaust, and killed due to the carelessness of others. A few were even acts of suicide.
    In her 27 years of active service, the Hornet lost 300 people. The majority of these deaths were battle related. However, the ship also holds a horrible title. It is known as the U.S. ship with the highest rate of suicide. So, it certainly seems plausible that such a bloody history might result in a ghost or two.











    Over the years, both crewmen and visitors have made claims about the Hornet's ghostly activity. Some of the claims might be dismissed easily by other explanations. Things like objects falling off shelves, toilets flushing on their own, bangs and other sounds could have perfectly feasible explanations.
    However, the same can't be said for the number of people who have witnessed full body apparitions. Doors opening and closing by themselves can't be easily explained away. Nor can tools that vanish in the midst of being used be easily explained. Especially when they are never found again.






U.S.S. Lexington





USS Lexington

    Many of the same types of events occur aboard the USS Lexington. Although dry-docked in Texas, the ship turned museum seems to hold on to its illustrious military past.
    It was nicknamed the "blue ghost" by the Japanese who claimed on more than one occasion to have sunken the ship only to watch it return yet again. The ship certainly had an illustrious military career, but it was also equally bloody with hundreds of sailors losing their lives aboard the carrier.
   Tourists and staff alike have reported seeing and, in some cases, talking to sailors dressed in old-fashioned uniforms. Visitors at first assumed the beings were part of the "show" put on by the museum. However, after talking with others, they were surprised to discover that such individuals were aboard the ship.
Others swear to have seen a man dressed in full Japanese World War II regalia aboard the ship, sometimes in the company of another young American sailor. Again, however, no such individuals were hired to "entertain" visitors.
    Still others claim to have witnessed a soldier moving through a wall of the ship, in the location where a doorway once existed. They also reported hearing footsteps, bangs, and clanks that sounded as though soldiers were at their work stations.
The Atlantic Paranormal Society (TAPS) checked out the Lexington themselves and managed to catch two different cases of vocal electronic voice phenomena. Oddly, both appeared to be female.












    After extensive research, TAPS was able to discover that one female sailor had been killed on board the Lexington. Whether or not it was she who attempted to make communication with the group, no one can say.
    If these ships are haunted, one must question why. Certainly, it seems feasible that they could have left behind some residual energy because of the bloody past of both ships. On the other hand, it could be that some of the crew continue doing in death what they did in life - - perform their duties on behalf of their country.
    Certainly, it isn't a stretch for anyone who believes in ghosts to believe that they might also haunt ships. The real question lies not in the location of the ghosts, but in whether or not you believe in them at all. Those that do, will likely see the hauntings of the Hornet and Lexington as just another link the chain being forged as the ultimate proof.

BABA YAGA, THE RUSSIAN FOLKLORE WITCH!







    Myths and legends are a part of virtually every culture. One of the most interesting legends of Russian culture is that of Baba Yaga. She is, however, not unique to Russia. There are similar stories about her, under other names, in Poland as well as in the Czech Republic.
    The figure of Baba Yaga is most often pictured as that of an old hag on a broomstick, reminiscent of the kitchen witches we often see today. Some believe that she might have been the precursor for the ugly, old crones that most often represent witches at Halloween.
    In truth, however, Baba Yaga is a complicated creature associated as much with fertility and fate as she is with death. Some believed that she also had the gift of prophecy and great wisdom. However, for reasons never understood, she seldom chose to use those skills without exacting a gruesome payment. Anyone wishing to partake of Baba Yaga's wisdom had to take on a challenge, which began with a trip to her home hidden deep within a treacherous forest. Those arriving there would often decide to turn back without confronting the hag because of the gruesome look of the house itself. As legends have it, Baba Yaga's home sat atop four chicken legs that allowed her to move it from place to place at will. Surrounded by a black picket fence adorned with flaming human skulls, those arriving on her property were no doubt scared about what they were about to encounter.
    Inside the house, it was said that the crone sat at a spinning wheel, spinning with thread made from the tendons and muscles of human beings. Not prone to help anyone out of a sense of kindness, Baba Yaga would put those who sought her assistance through a series of tests before agreeing to help them.
    Few ever completed them and even some of those who did were never seen again because they dared to anger the old woman in the process. She then turned on them with her sharp teeth. It was said that she could rip apart an animal or a human in less that 30 seconds.

CANDY APPLES TO HELP RELIEVE THAT SWEET TOOTH ADDICTION!!


Candy apples



candy apples



Today will be about how to do it right, how marvelous to see and how to 'bite' ;-)
After inviting recipe .. after the match ;-)
-------------------------------------------------- -
Candy apples - lovely red autumn associated with Christmas and Halloween. Their history dates back to the early twentieth century in the United States. 'Invented' it William W. Kolb, who worked on the holiday recipe for red cinnamon candies, dipped in the caramel apples and put on display at his shop .. Apples in a crispy coating of sugar and cinnamon became popular very quickly. Not wondered how they could eat? They are hard, but more crispy - hard-wearing than I break-teeth - hard ;-). Careful, they can be cut into pieces with a knife. 


Ingredients for 4 candy apples:
  • 4 green apples such as Granny Smith
  • 4 wooden sticks
  • 250 g of sugar
  • 50 ml of water
  • 1 tablespoon (20 grams) of honey or golden syrupu
  • half a teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • pinch of ground cloves
  • a little red dye

Wash apples, dry, tear tails. Insert the sticks in them.
The plate put baking paper and smear a thin layer of oil.
For a small pot pour sugar. Add the water, honey, vanilla extract, spices and dye. Stir everything together and bring to a boil. 
In a pot of boiling caramel put a thermometer and cook over medium burner, without stirring, until the thermometer reaches 280 º F (137 º C), the so-called. soft crack stage (if you do not have a thermometer confectionery - watch the video ). Soak in the first apple caramel prepared and carefully in the coat, shaking off excess caramel. Set aside on paper. In the same way, proceed with the remaining apples.




candy apples

Monday, September 26, 2016

TOP 10 FAMILY FRIENDLY HALLOWEEN MOVIES!

  Halloween is just around the corner and with it comes loads of candy, movies, costumes, and fun! Because we already have a list of the top 10 horror movies, we thought it might be a nice idea to do a list of halloween movies that are suitable for all ages – something the kids and adults will both love. I have tried to pick a good balanced selection of movies – not just horror movies, but movies that contain halloween themes: witches, ghosts, and all things spooky. I have intentionally excluded movie series (such as the Harry Potter series) and Halloween versions of popular shows (such as the Spongebob Halloween special). If you haven’t seen any of these movies, you definitely should. Be sure to tell us what movies you will be watching this halloween! This list contains a competition – further details at the bottom of the list.



10.  Hocus Pocus/1993
 
 






    More than 300 years ago, 3 witches were sentenced to die in Salem, Massachusetts and a boy was turned into a cat (a black cat, naturally). Now it’s Halloween, and the witches (who fly on – I kid you not – vacuum cleaners) are back. This time, they’ve got their eyes on immortal life and have turned their wrath on trick-or-treaters and it’s up to the 300-year-old cat to save the day.



9.  Corpse Bride/2005








   When an arranged marriage between Victor Van Dort and Victoria Everglot reaches the rehearsals, Victor starts to worry. Spending time alone in the forest, Victor decides to practice on his own. Everything seems to go well, until he accidentally puts the ring upon the hand of a corpse. Before he knows it, Victor is in the land of dead and now has a corpse bride. Whilst everyones worries about who Victoria will marry in the land of the living, Victor desperately finds a way to get back.



8.  Casper/1995









   Furious that her late father only willed her his gloomy-looking mansion rather than his millions, Carrigan Crittenden (Moriarty) is ready to burn the place to the ground when she discovers a map to a treasure hidden in the house. But when she enters the rickety mansion to seek her claim, she is frightened away by a wicked wave of ghosts. Determined to get her hands on this hidden fortune, she hires afterlife therapist Dr. James Harvey (Pullman) to exorcise the ghosts from the mansion. Harvey and his daugh- ter Kat (Ricci) move in, and soon Kat meets Casper, the ghost of a young boy who’s “the friendliest ghost you know.”



7.  Monsters, Inc./2001









   In a land of monsters, James P. Sullivan is king. He and his coworker/ friend Mike Wazowski are two of many monsters that work for Monsters Inc. a utility company that generates power for a very paranoid and nervous city of monsters. This power, oddly enough, is generated from the screams of children, which is produced by scaring them in their sleep. One night, however, Sully uncovers a devious plot to rid Monster city of it’s power problems, but in all the wrong ways. Together, ironically, Sully and Mike will fight to protect the innocence of the children they scare every night.



6.  The Witches/1990







   A young boy, recently orphaned, is taken to England by his grandmother. At a hotel in which they are staying, a group of witches have gathered to prepare a plot to rid the world of all children. This movie is based on the wonderful book by Roald Dahl and stars Anjelica Huston and Rown Atkinson. This is a film that the kids will definitely love. This film was produced by Jim Henson.


5.  Something Wicked This Way Comes/1983





   In a small anywhere town in any state in America, two young boys- quiet Will Halloway and somewhat rebellious Jim Nightshade-enjoy the ever-shortening days of autumn. When the boys hear about a strange traveling carnival from a lightning rod salesman, they decide to see what it is all about-but Will is fearful, as most carnivals end their tours after Labor Day. When the ominous Mr. Dark, the Illustrated Man, rides into town on a dark midnight, setting up his massive carnival in a matter of seconds, the boys are both thrilled and terrified. A great film by Ray Bradbury.



4.  Pufnstuf/1970





   Originally a television program, the Pufnstuf film was a real gem and has outlived the series. One of the best things about this film is that it stars Mama Cass (Cass Elliot) from the Mamas and the Papas, as Witch Hazel. The show and the film were both notable for bright colors, fast edits, sped-up film, musical segments and pop culture in-jokes, and appealed to young adults almost as much as children. Central to the film is young Jimmy and his magic flute, and a group of wicked witches who want to capture the flute for themselves. The series and movie are named after one other important character, a friendly dragon.



3.  The Nightmare Before Christmas/1993
 
 






   Jack Skellington, the pumpkin king of Halloween Town, is bored with doing the same thing every year for Halloween. One day he stumbles into Christmas Town, and is so taken with the idea of Christmas that he tries to get the resident bats, ghouls, and goblins of Halloween town to help him put on Christmas instead of Halloween — but alas, they can’t get it quite right.



2.  Beetle Juice/1988

 
 





   After Barbara and Adam Maitland were killed in a car crash, they find themselves trapped as ghosts in their beautiful New England farmhouse. Their peace is disrupted when a yuppie family, the Deetzs, buy their house. The Maitlands are too nice and harmless as ghosts and all their efforts to scare the Deetzs away were unsuccessful. They eventually turn to another ghost ‘Beetlejuice’ for help…


1.  Ghost Busters/1984



 
 
 

   Three odd-ball scientists get kicked out of their cushy positions at a university in New York City where they studied the occult. They decide to set up shop in an old firehouse and become Ghostbusters, trapping pesky ghosts, spirits, haunts, and poltergeists for money. They wise-crack their way through the city, and stumble upon a gateway to another dimension, one which will release untold evil upon the city. The Ghostbusters are called on to save the Big Apple. This film is a timeless cult classic.

TOP TEN MAD SCIENTISTS!!


    • Johann Konrad Dippel (1673-1734)Germany

     
  • A fact that few know is that this alchemist and theologian of the seventeenth century, the inventor of one of the first synthetic dyes, he worked in the Castle Frankenstein, near Darmstadt, Germany, not clear whether the writer Mary Shelley was inspired by this character to create her famous novel. The truth is that Dippel spent much of his life in search of an elixir of immortality, and ironically died in the attempt to drink a potion of his invention.


    Jack Parsons (1914-1952)United States


     
  • Rocket propulsion researcher at one of the founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA was also a believer in the occult and black magic practitioner. Part of the success of the space program of the United States is the work of this remarkable self-taught scientist. Friend of the 'wizard', English Alestes Crowley and L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Dianetics. Parson's tragic death in a home lab cemented his legend.


    Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925)England


     
  • It is known as one of the founders of modern theory of electrical circuits and vector analysis in electromagnetism, and his ideas are evident to this day. He almost won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1912. He replaced the furniture in his house with stones of granite, was obsessed with chickens running over his bike, documenting what he ate, so he left detailed accounts in his diaries, he could make bowls and glasses of milk for days, suffering termofilia, fear of not being well covered for the cold. But the most bizarre was that he kept his sister Marry Way as his maid for 7 or 8 years, in a state of virtual slavery.


    Blondlot Rene (1849-1930)France


     
  • Although a respected scientist in his day, especially for his work with electromagnetism, is remembered for having 'discovered' the N-rays, "a new form of radiation that could never be proven and suspected it was a hallucination of his.


    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) Hungarian-US


     
  • Perhaps one of the most important inventors in history for his contribution in the development of the electricity industry (to him we owe the first practical use of the AC). The list of inventions (such as AC power generator, the induction motor, etc.). And ideas generated in life contrasts diametrically with his eccentricities. He never had a permanent home, as he preferred to live in hotel rooms where his demands were quite peculiar: he had a strange case of trifilia, a marked obsession that made him as daily for towels, pates or silverware in multiples of three. He left his hotel 3 times daily to go around the block and counted his steps, and always chose hotel room 207. He also washed his hands all the time, and had a terrible phobia of germs, and also developed an irrational fear of round objects. In addition, he experienced visual and auditory hallucinations. He came to regard pigeons as his only friends.


    Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957) Germany


     
  • A disciple of Freud and one of the reformers of psychoanalysis, his figure and work are still controversial. Although the creator of many theories in the field of psychology, he is remembered, perhaps unfairly, for creating the concept of orgone, a kind of vital energy that could be stored in a device he invented. This led him to prison by order of the Food and Drug Administration of the United States, who considered him mentally unstable. And ordered the burning of many of his books on the subject. He died in prison. Out of this incident, many of his ideas have influenced other creative minds.


    Theodore Kaczynski (born 1942)United States


     
  • With an IQ of 170, this brilliant mathematician specializing in geometric function, a graduate of Harvard. Considered a young genius, he had rather peculiar habits. He suffered a pathological shyness and hated human contact. At a level of living in isolation in a cabin in the word of Montana. He began a campaign of terrorism by the nickname of "Unabomber. He had the authorities on his trail for nearly twenty years.


    Jacques Beveniste (1935-2004)France


     
  • His brilliant career in biology broke down when he published an article establishing the existence of certain elements in the water was suggested that it was biologically "active. His experiments claimed that water was the "memory of substances that had been dissolved in it. He was declared a fraud by the scientific community.


    Bruce Edwards Ivins (1946-2008)United States


     
  • This American microbiologist worked at the Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. In a 2001 bioterrorist attack with anthrax spores, he was one of the main suspects. Ivins committed suicide a few days before the FBI could file charges against him, so his apparent involvement in the events will remain a mystery.



    Trofim Lysenko (1898-1976)Ukraine

  • Under the regime of Stalin, this character led the agricultural science in the former Soviet Union. He claims the concept of Lysenkoism, a campaign against the genetic theory that was maintained for thirty years, arguing that this was contrary to the Marxist concepts and calling it a "bourgeois science". this model is currently interpreted as submission of science to the political interests of the state.

DIY DRYER VENT PUMPKINS, A NICE DECORATION FOR INSIDE THE HOUSE!

  Found this little diy while doing a little web surfing.  Brought to you by www.adiamondinthestuff.blogspot.com .  I hope you enjoy making a few of these for this fall season.  Don't forget to stop by her blog for other useful stuff you might like.


Dryer Vent Pumpkin {Tutorial}




   Last year I made some dryer vent pumpkins. I didn't really post a tutorial and since I was making a bunch more this year I decided to tell you how I did it. It's super duper easy and there are a ton of ways to personalize them to your style.




   I bought two different sizes of dryer vent at Home Depot. They measure 3in and 4in, I only made one size last year but I wanted to add some variety this go around. I cut them using wire cutters and scissors, making sure I had enough length by twisting the vent in a circle and giving a little extra room for gluing.




  I used hot glue to attach the two raw ends of the dryer vent together. Side note: the metal of the dryer vent will get very hot once the hot glue is applied and your pressing it together. Not that I learned that the hard way or anything!!!




   Once they are glued it's painting time. This is where you can change things up to match your style! Want more neutral colors? More vibrant colors? How about metallics??? I used Heirloom White and Real Orange by Rustoleum.




   Once the paint was dry it was time to add a "stem". I used a cinnamon stick and glued it into the center of the pumpkin. You can use a stick from the yard or a cut piece of wood, whatever you fancy! I also added a bit of spanish moss for a little texture and warmth.




I love the orange ones....but I'm totally crushing on the white ones!!!





I love them! I'm bringing a ton to my show on Friday (If you live on the California Central Coast and your interested in attending please let me know!)


40 FACTS AND FEATURES OF VAMPIRES!

     
     
     
  • Many scholars argue the word “vampire” is either from the Hungarian vampir or from the Turkish upior, upper, upyr meaning “witch.” Other scholars argue the term derived from the Greek word “to drink” or from the Greek nosophoros meaning “plague carrier.” It may also derive from the Serbian Bamiiup or the Serbo-Crotian pirati. There are many terms for “vampire” found across cultures, suggesting that vampires are embedded in human consciousness.
  • A group a vampires has variously been called a clutch, brood, coven, pack, or a clan.Probably the most famous vampire of all time, Count Dracula, quoted Deuteronomy 12:23: “The blood is the life.”
  • The Muppet vampire, Count von Count from Sesame Street, is based on actual vampire myth. One way to supposedly deter a vampire is to throw seeds (usually mustard) outside a door or place fishing net outside a window. Vampires are compelled to count the seeds or the holes in the net, delaying them until the sun comes up.
  • Prehistoric stone monuments called “dolmens” have been found over the graves of the dead in northwest Europe. Anthropologists speculate they have been placed over graves to keep vampires from rising.
  • A rare disease called porphyria (also called the "vampire" or "Dracula" disease) causes vampire-like symptoms, such as an extreme sensitivity to sunlight and sometimes hairiness. In extreme cases, teeth might be stained reddish brown, and eventually the patient may go mad.
  • Documented medical disorders that people accused of being a vampire may have suffered from include haematodipsia  which is a sexual thirst for blood, and hemeralopia or day blindness. Anemia (“bloodlessness”) was often mistaken for a symptom of a vampire attack.







  • One of the most famous “true vampires” was Countess Elizabeth Bathory (1560-1614) who was accused of biting the flesh of girls while torturing them and bathing in their blood to retain her youthful beauty. She was by all accounts a very attractive woman.
  • Vampire legends may have been based on Vlad of Walachia, also known as Vlad the Impaler (c. 1431-1476). He had a habit of nailing hats to people’s heads, skinning them alive, and impaling them on upright stakes. He also liked to dip bread into the blood of his enemies and eat it. His name, Vlad, means son of the dragon or Dracula, who has been identified as the historical Dracula. Though Vlad the Impaler was murdered in 1476, his tomb is reported empty.
  • One of the earliest accounts of vampires is found in an ancient Sumerian and Babylonian myth dating to 4,000 B.C. which describes ekimmu or edimmu (one who is snatched away). The ekimmu is a type of uruku or utukku (a spirit or demon) who was not buried properly and has returned as a vengeful spirit to suck the life out of the living.
  • According to the Egyptian text the Pert em Hru (Egyptian Book of the Dead), if the ka (one of the five parts of the soul) does not receive particular offerings, it ventures out of its tomb as a kha to find nourishment, which may include drinking the blood of the living. In addition, the Egyptian goddess Sekhmet was known to drink blood. The ancient fanged goddess Kaliof India also had a powerful desire for blood.
  • Chinese vampires were called a ch’iang shih (corpse-hopper) and had red eyes and crooked claws. They were said to have a strong sexual drive that led them to attack women. As they grew stronger, the ch’iang shih gained the ability to fly, grew long white hair, and could also change into a wolf.
  • While both vampires and zombies generally belong to the “undead,” there are differences between them depending on the mythology from which they emerged. For example, zombies tend to have a lower IQ than vampires, prefer brains and flesh rather than strictly blood, are immune to garlic, most likely have a reflection in the mirror, are based largely in African myth, move more slowly due to rotting muscles, can enter churches, and are not necessarily afraid of fire or sunlight.
  • Vampire hysteria and corpse mutilations to “kill” suspected vampires were so pervasive in Europe during the mid-eighteenth century that some rulers created laws to prevent the unearthing of bodies. In some areas, mass hysteria led to public executions of people believed to be vampires.






  • The first full work of fiction about a vampire in English was John Polidori’s influential The Vampyre, which was published incorrectly under Lord Byron’s name. Polidori (1795-1821) was Byron’s doctor and based his vampire on Byron.f
  • The first vampire movie is supposedly Secrets of House No. 5 in 1912. F.W. Murnau’s silent black-and-white Nosferatu came soon after, in 1922. However, it was Tod Browning’s Draculawith the erotic, charming, cape- and tuxedo-clad aristocrat played by Bela Lugosithat became the hallmark of vampire movies and literature.
  • A vampire supposedly has control over the animal world and can turn into a bat, rat, owl, moth, fox, or wolf.
  • In 2009, a sixteenth-century female skull with a rock wedged in its mouth was found near the remains of plague victims. It was not unusual during that century to shove a rock or brick in the mouth of a suspected vampire to prevent it from feeding on the bodies of other plague victims or attacking the living. Female vampires were also often blamed for spreading the bubonic plague throughout Europe.
  • Joseph Sheridan Le Fany’s gothic 1872 novella about a female vampire, “Carmilla,” is considered the prototype for female and lesbian vampires and greatly influenced Bram Stoker’s own Dracula. In the story, Carmilla is eventually discovered as a vampire and, true to folklore remedies, she is staked in her blood-filled coffin, beheaded, and cremated.
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) remains an enduring influence on vampire mythology and has never gone out of print. Some scholars say it is clearly a Christian allegory; others suggest it contains covert psycho-sexual anxieties reflective of the Victorian era.
  • According to several legends, if someone was bitten by a suspected vampire, he or she should drink the ashes of a burned vampire. To prevent an attack, a person should make bread with the blood of vampire and eat it.







  • Thresholds have historically held significant symbolic value, and a vampire cannot cross a threshold unless invited. The connection between threshold and vampires seems to be a concept of complicity or allowance. Once a commitment is made to allow evil, evil can re-enter at any time.
  • Before Christianity, methods of repelling vampires included garlic, hawthorn branches, rowan trees (later used to make crosses), scattering of seeds, fire, decapitation with a gravedigger’s spade, salt (associated with preservation and purity), iron, bells, a rooster’s crow, peppermint, running water, and burying a suspected vampire at a crossroads. It was also not unusual for a corpse to be buried face down so it would dig down the wrong way and become lost in the earth.
  • After the advent of Christianity, methods of repelling vampires began to include holy water, crucifixes, and Eucharist wafers. These methods were usually not fatal to the vampire, and their effectiveness depended on the belief of the user.
  • Garlic, a traditional vampire repellent, has been used as a form of protection for over 2,000 years. The ancient Egyptians believed garlic was a gift from God, Roman soldiers thought it gave them courage, sailors believed it protected them from shipwreck, and German miners believed it protected them from evil spirits when they went underground. In several cultures, brides carried garlic under their clothes for protection, and cloves of garlic were used to protect people from a wide range of illnesses. Modern-day scientists found that the oil in garlic, allicin, is a highly effective antibiotic.
  • That sunlight can kill vampires seems to be a modern invention, perhaps started by the U.S. government to scare superstitious guerrillas in the Philippines in the 1950s. While sunlight can be used by vampires to kill other vampires, as in Ann Rice’s popular novel Interview with a Vampire, other vampires such as Lord Ruthven and Varney were able to walk in daylight.
  • The legend that vampires must sleep in coffins probably arose from reports of gravediggers and morticians who described corpses suddenly sitting up in their graves or coffins. This eerie phenomenon could be caused by the decomposing process.
  • According to some legends, a vampire may engage in sex with his former wife, which often led to pregnancy. In fact, this belief may have provided a convenient explanation as to why a widow, who was supposed to be celibate, became pregnant. The resulting child was called a gloglave (pl. glog) in Bulgarian or vampirdzii in Turkish. Rather than being ostracized, the child was considered a hero who had powers to slay a vampire.








  • The Twilight book series (Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn) by Stephanie Meyers has also become popular with movie-goers. Meyers admits that she did not research vampire mythology. Indeed, her vampires break tradition in several ways. For example, garlic, holy items, and sunlight do not harm them. Some critics praise the book for capturing teenage feelings of sexual tension and alienation.
  • Hollywood and literary vampires typically deviate from folklore vampires. For example, Hollywood vampires are typically pale, aristocratic, very old, need their native soil, are supernaturally beautiful, and usually need to be bitten to become a vampire. In contrast, folklore vampires (before Bram Stoker) are usually peasants, recently dead, initially appear as shapeless “bags of blood,” do not need their native soil, and are often cremated with or without being staked.
  • Folklore vampires can become vampires not only through a bite, but also if they were once a werewolf, practiced sorcery, were excommunicated, committed suicide, were an illegitimate child of parents who were illegitimate, or were still born or died before baptism. In addition, anyone who has eaten the flesh of a sheep killed by a wolf, was a seventh son, was the child of a pregnant woman who was looked upon by a vampire, was a nun who stepped over an unburied body, had teeth when they were born, or had a cat jump on their corpse before being buried could also turn into vampires.
  • In vampire folklore, a vampire initially emerges as a soft blurry shape with no bones. He was “bags of blood” with red, glowing eyes and, instead of a nose, had a sharp snout that he sucked blood with. If he could survive for 40 days, he would then develop bones and a body and become much more dangerous and difficult to kill.
  • While blood drinking isn’t enough to define a vampire, it is an overwhelming feature. In some cultures, drinking the blood of a victim allowed the drinker to absorb their victim’s strength, take on an animal’s quality, or even make a woman more fecund. The color red is also involved in many vampire rituals.
  • In some vampire folktales, vampires can marry and move to another city where they take up jobs suitable for vampires, such as butchers, barbers, and tailors. That they become butchers may be based on the analogy that butchers are a descendants of the “sacrificer."
  • Certain regions in the Balkans believed that fruit, such as pumpkins or watermelons, would become vampires if they were left out longer than 10 days or not consumed by Christmas. Vampire pumpkins or watermelons generally were not feared because they do not have teeth. A drop of blood on a fruit's skin is a sign that it is about to turn into a vampire.







  • Mermaids can also be vampires—but instead of sucking blood, they suck out the breath of their victims.
  • By the end of the twentieth century, over 300 motion pictures were made about vampires, and over 100 of them featured Dracula. Over 1,000 vampire novels were published, most within the past 25 years.
  • The most popular vampire in children’s fiction in recent years had been Bunnicula, the cute little rabbit that lives a happy existence as a vegetarian vampire.
  • Some historians argue that Prince Charles is a direct descendant of the Vlad the Impaler, the son of Vlad Dracula.
  • The best known recent development of vampire mythology is Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spin-off, Angel. Buffy is interesting because it contemporizes vampirism in the very real, twentieth-century world of a teenager vampire slayer played by Sarah Michelle Gellar and her “Scooby gang.” It is also notable because the show has led to the creation of “Buffy Studies” in academia.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

CANDY, COSTUMES AND CAVITIES, HERE ARE SOME FACTS TO GET YOU READY FOR HALLOWEEN!!!

 
 
 
 
 

   From pumpkin farmers to confectioners to costume shops and beyond, Halloween is big business in the U.S.--generating nearly $6 billion annually in retail sector alone.  We dig into the numbers to show where the big money is spent, on everything from national charities to neighborhood dentists.


  • 36 million-Number of trick-or-treat aged kids 5 to 13 in the U.S.

  • 93%-Percentage of children who get to dress up and go door to door.

  • $5.77 billion-Total spent in 2008 on Halloween, including candy, parties and witches' brew.

  • $140 million-Money Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF has raised since 1950.

  • 51.8 million-Number of adults who don their sexy nurse, pimp or pirate outfits on Halloween.

  • 73.4%-Percentage of households that say they will dish out treats on Halloween (26.6%: Number of households just asking for a nasty trick)

  • 28%-Number of children, aged 2 to 5, who will get cavities.

  • 1.1 billion-Pounds of pumpkins decorated, turned into pie and smashed in the U.S. each year.

CHRISTIANITY vs. HALLOWEEN, WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL!







   Around Halloween every year a fair number of Christians express disgust at the idea of celebrating a "satanic holiday." To some Christians the very idea of Halloween is repulsive. Halloween and everything involved in it seems to strike a chord deep in the hearts of the most adamant Christian believers. It appears to be contrary to everything a Christian believes is good and holy with all of the evil ghosts, devils and witches floating about. But is Halloween really the evil satanic holiday that some Christians think it is?
    The best place to begin is... at the beginning. There is a lot of literature available on the history of Halloween, including web sites and books. Some of it is even accurate! Most of it boils down to a few simple facts. Halloween appears to have started with the Celtic people. I say it "appears" to have started with them because they didn't write much down. They had a strong oral tradition much like American Indians. What we learn about Celts often comes from the writings of non-Celtic people (often their enemies). While there's a bit of truth to it, the writing obviously has to be taken with fair amount of skepticism.








    What we do know with certainty is that the early Celtic people were not Christians. The Celts believed that there was a natural world and a supernatural world. They had gods, spirits, elves and fairies controlling and influencing their lives. However, since they weren't Christians, there was no concept of Satan! This means that from the very beginning Halloween was never intended to be a satanic holiday.
   The earliest form of Halloween was a harvest festival, more like Thanksgiving than anything else. The Celts thanked their gods for the harvest and they consulted them for predictions about the next year. They believed that the natural and supernatural worlds were close enough to almost touch on Halloween so they did their best to use the








opportunity to get some helpful insight for the next year. Life was tough back then and they were trying to figure out how to make it through another grueling year in Ireland. Stories of worshiping the lord of the dead around this time are just that... stories.
    Fast forward a few hundred years and we have people dressing up like pirates, Batman, witches and Elvis while they go out drinking. Meanwhile masked children are roaming the streets in search of candy. There are also a few obscure cults and Satan worshipping religions that have attached special meaning to Halloween. The question any Christian should be asking is whether any of those things matter. Is it wrong to dress like a pirate and ask for candy? I'm sure if you ask the question "what would Jesus do" that's probably not the answer you'll get, but that doesn't make it necessarily wrong. You'll have to measure whether dressing like a giant M&M and asking for candy is right or wrong based on your own values.










    The cults and dark religions are a different issue. What if a group of people started sacrificing animals to Satan on Christmas? Would that make Christmas a satanic holiday? What about 500 years from now? Sadly, that is what has happened to Halloween. It has been hijacked over the years by different groups using it for their own purposes. Its meaning has been distorted over the years (purposely by some Christians) but the original intent was never to be anything other than a harvest celebration.
    Perhaps it's time to take Halloween back. The next time you hear a Christian saying they don't believe in Halloween or they think it's evil, take a few minutes to set them straight. Tell them to take this opportunity to thank God for the harvest and ask for His wisdom for the upcoming year. After all, that's what the holiday was intended for. If you go out and get a bunch of candy, well then it would be a good thing to thank God for that harvest as well (you might want to pray for good teeth too).






   This Halloween, instead of fighting against the holiday embrace the original meaning of it and use it as an opportunity to educate others. After all, it could be that the Celts had it partially right. Maybe on this one day, we're closer to the supernatural world. Maybe just maybe, if we use the opportunity to pray for wisdom we'll be able to get some of our own divine guidance for next year!

WHAT MAKES THE GRAVEYARD A SPOOKY AND SCARY PLACE?





    Under the watchful gaze of crumbling saints and baby-faced cherubs, you hurry down a path lined with mausoleums. Eventually, you pass crops of headstones casting long, narrow shadows in the moonlight. Each engraved with the epitaph of the dead person's life. You run past sunken graves and dying flowers, hoping that the sound you hear is just the wind and you're trying to shake the feeling that something is following close behind you.
    Maybe you've never taken a midnight stroll through your local cemetery. But if you have ever set foot in one, you've likely felt a hint of fear and uneasiness that is their legacy. Maybe you were attending a funeral of someone dear and close to you, touring graveyards or simply fleeing things that go bump in the night.
    Whatever your reason for strolling among the tombstones, you probably felt something noteworthy about the experience-something different from all the other spaces and places that fill our lives. After all, graveyards are the final resting place for many of our dead. People say their last goodbyes there, sometimes returning year after year to leave flowers or say a few words.
    No matter where we travel in the world, cemeteries are silent and solemn settings. Whether the grounds are finely manicured or left to the weeds, graveyard exist as the place where the living contemplate many mysteries, traumas and heartbreaks associated with death.
    Why are many people afraid of graveyards? Is it the thought of all those decaying bodies (zombies) under the dirt or the idea of an old crusty are coming out of the grass to grab your foot and pull you into their final resting spot with them? Or is it something deeper?









    Cats often receive a bum rap for hanging out in cemeteries, but can anyone blame them? Graveyards offer a cat everything they could ask for: all the best spots to nap, trees to use as scratching posts and a selection of small animals to prey on. What more could your averages sized cat want with your dead relatives soul when there are many squirrels and birds around to occupy their time?
    To cats, graveyards may be another place to sleep away the afternoon, but to we humans, they represent the mystery and the outrage of mortality. Whether we like it or not we're all going to die. You may think you've accepted that fact, but it's an issue humanity has struggled with for ages. Unable to avoid it, we've tried to figure out what lies beyond its doors. Will we live forever in a golden paradise, be reincarnated as a cow (or a cat that spends all afternoon in a cemetery) or simply cease to exist? We've pined for understanding since the times of the great pyramids and stared into the eyes of guillotined heads, hoping to catch a glimpse of something other than the emptiness of nonexistence.
    Fear exists as a response to stimuli that threatens our survival as a species. We're programmed to fight or run from anything that might cause death, and we approach death with this same attitude. We flee from it every day by distancing it from our thoughts and lives. In most parts of the world, we've handed the duties of interring the dead over to morticians, which limits our intimacy with death.
    Fighting death is trickier. To avoid staring down mortality, we've redefined what death is. We choose to see dying not as something our bodies eventually do, but something that eventually happens to our bodies. We cast ourselves as the victim of death, which is the reason grim reapers and other death-stalking beings permeate our beliefs. If death is a natural counterpart to life, there's nothing we can do about it in the end. But if it's something inflicted on us by an outside force, then perhaps we have a fighting chance.
    Society often sets aside the angel of death and instead chooses to practice what some people call "the deconstruction of mortality." That is, we break down the insurmountable mystery of death into smaller pieces we can digest easily: biological functions, diseases and mental dysfunctions. If prayer or bribing the reaper doesn't work, maybe multiple organ transplants will.
Pray and think about death all you want, but it's still going to happen at some time.









    Disposing of a body isn't difficult. Bury it in the forest, cremate it or just leave it out for the vultures--a rite Zoroastrains in India still practice. Not only are these methods cheaper than buying a fancy casket and a cemetery plot, but they also allow "Mother Earth" to reclaim the decaying material faster. The use of stone mausoleums, coffins and embalming only slows down the decomposition process.
    But then again, burials aren't really about the dead--they're about the living. We do our best to stave off some of the bad properties of death. And while immortality isn't an option, tombstones and stone monuments serve as long-lasting markers of the life that was. Aunt Betty may be out of your life for good, but a slab of engraved granite will serve as a reminder that she existed. Cemetery stonework also serves to encourage a sacred atmosphere, enforcing notions of afterlife and further establishing the site as a kind of sacred place between life and death.
    We humans fear death, yet we work hard to maintain hallowed spaces where the dead are memorialized and at least partially preserved. On top of that, we heap religions full of resurrection prophecies and thousands of years' worth of superstitions, folktales and ghost stories. We're constantly repressing our feelings about death or magnifying them to tremendous proportions. Maybe you avoid cemeteries and nursing homes, or actively try to speak to the dead through TV psychic mediums-either way, you're striving to avoid the real relationship that exists between life and death.
    We've poured a lot of sacrament, superstition and fear into our graveyards, which makes for quite a powerful atmosphere. Not only do graveyards play on past memories of loss, they also invoke potentially potent themes of supernatural terror. It's not just horror movies that contribute to this frightening reputation. Cemetery preservation groups and historical societies sometime get in on the action with haunted tours.
In more extreme cases, people actually suffer from colmetrophobia, the fear of graveyards. The condition involves a heightened, unrealistic fear of graveyards that actively interferes with a person's life. But unless walking past a cemetery makes your heart race, your fear probably doesn't qualify as a phobia.
    For the most part, the only things you really have to fear in graveyards are collapsing tombstones and monuments. Besides that, living, breathing humans are responsible for more graveyard assaults than all the vampires, zombies and ghouls combined.

THE OKTORBERFEST FROM GERMANY!








    Oktoberfest is a 16–18 day festival held annually in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, running from late September to the first weekend in October. It is one of the most famous events in Germany and is the world's largest fair, with more than 5 million people attending every year. The Oktoberfest is an important part of Bavarian culture, having been held since 1810. Other cities across the world also hold Oktoberfest celebrations, modeled after the Munich event.
    The Munich Oktoberfest originally took place during the sixteen days up to and including the first Sunday in October. In 1994, the schedule was modified in response to German reunification so that if the first Sunday in October falls on the 1st or 2nd, then the festival would go on until October 3 (German Unity Day). Thus, the festival is now 17 days when the first Sunday is October 2 and 18 days when it is October 1. In 2010, the festival lasted until the first Monday in October, to mark the 200-year anniversary of the event. The festival is held in an area named the Theresienwiese (field, or meadow, of Therese), often called Wiesn for short, located near Munich's center.
   The 2012 edition of the Oktoberfest will officially begin on Saturday 22nd of September 2012. At midday the mayor of Munich will take the honour to tap the first barrel of beer. Once the barrel has been opened, all visitors will be able to quench their thirst.
It is worthy to arrive early in order to assist to the celebration, that's why visitors arrive at 9 in the morning to ensure the best seats. The Oktoberfest will go on until October 7th 2012 .










    Only beer which is brewed within the city limits of Munich is allowed to be served in this festival. Upon passing this criteria, a beer is designated Oktoberfest Beer. Oktoberfest Beer is a registered Trademark by the Club of Munich Brewers. Those Breweries are members of this exclusive Club. In alphabetical Order -Augustinerbräu -Hacker-Pschorr Bräu -Hofbräu -Löwenbräu -Paulanerbräu -Spatenbräu.
   Large quantities of German beer are consumed, with almost 7 million liters served during the 16 day festival in 2007. Visitors may also enjoy a wide variety of traditional fare such as Hendl (chicken), Schweinebraten (roast pork), Schweinshaxe (grilled ham hock), Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Würstl (sausages) along with Brezn (Pretzel), Knödel (potato or bread dumplings), Kasspatzn (cheese noodles), Reiberdatschi (potato pancakes), Sauerkraut or Blaukraut (red cabbage) along with such Bavarian delicacies as Obatzda (a spiced cheese-butter spread) and Weisswurst (a white sausage).


History

    The original "Oktoberfest" occurred in Munich, on October 12, 1810.

First hundred years

    In the year 1811, an agricultural show was added to boost Bavarian agriculture. The horse race persisted until 1960, the agricultural show still exists and it is held every four years on the southern part of the festival grounds. In 1816, carnival booths appeared; the main prizes were silver, porcelain, and jewelry. The founding citizens of Munich assumed responsibility for festival management in 1819, and it was agreed that the Oktoberfest would become an annual event. Later, it was lengthened and the date pushed forward, the reason being that days are longer and warmer at the end of September.










    To honour the marriage of Prince Ludwig and Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen, a parade took place for the first time in 1810. Since 1850, this has become a yearly event and an important component of the Oktoberfest. 8,000 people—mostly from Bavaria—in traditional costumes walk from Maximilian Street, through the centre of Munich, to the Oktoberfest. The march is led by the Münchner Kindl.
    Since 1850, the statue of Bavaria has watched the Oktoberfest. This worldly Bavarian patron was first sketched by Leo von Klenze in a classic style and Ludwig Michael Schwanthaler romanticised and "Germanised" the draft; it was constructed by Johann Baptist Stiglmaier and Ferdinand von Miller.
    In 1853, the Bavarian Ruhmeshalle was finished. In 1854, 3,000 residents of Munich succumbed to an epidemic of cholera, so the festival was cancelled. Bavaria's part in the Austro-Prussian War meant that there was no Oktoberfest in 1866. In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war was the reason for cancellation of the festival. In 1873, the festival was once more cancelled due to a cholera epidemic. In 1880, the electric light illuminated over 400 booths and tents. In 1881, booths selling bratwursts opened. Beer was first served in glass mugs in 1892.
    At the end of the 19th century, a re-organization took place. Until then, there were games of skittles, large dance floors, and trees for climbing in the beer booths. They wanted more room for guests and musicians. The booths became beer halls.




Inside one of the many beer tents



I   n 1887, the Entry of the Oktoberfest Staff and Breweries took place for the first time. This event showcases the splendidly decorated horse teams of the breweries and the bands that play in the festival tents. This event always takes place on the first Saturday of the Oktoberfest and symbolises the official prelude to the Oktoberfest celebration
In the year 1910, Oktoberfest celebrated its 100th birthday. 120,000 litres of beer were poured. In 1913, the Bräurosl was founded, which was the largest Oktoberfest beer tent of all time, with room for about 12,000 guests.

War years

    From 1914 to 1918, World War I prevented the celebration of Oktoberfest. In 1919 and 1920, the two years after the war, Munich celebrated only an "Autumn Fest." In 1923 and 1924, the Oktoberfest was not held due to inflation.
   In 1933, the Bavarian white and blue flag was replaced with the swastika flag. From 1939 to 1945, due to World War II, no Oktoberfest took place. From 1946 to 1948, after the war, Munich celebrated only the "Autumn Fest." The sale of proper Oktoberfest beer—2% stronger in alcohol than normal beer—was not permitted; guests had to drink normal beer.
    Since its beginnings the Oktoberfest has been cancelled 24 times due to war, disease and other emergencies.








Modern Festival

    Since 1950, there has been a traditional festival opening: A twelve gun salute and the tapping of the first keg of Oktoberfest beer at 12:00 by the incumbent Mayor of Munich with the cry "O' zapft is!" ("It's tapped!" in the Austro-Bavarian language) opens the Oktoberfest. The Mayor then gives the first beer to the Minister-President of the State of Bavaria. The first mayor to tap the keg was Thomas Wimmer.
    Horse races ended in 1960.
    By 1960, the Oktoberfest had turned into an enormous world-famous festival. Since then, foreigners began to picture Germans as wearing the Sennerhut, Lederhosen, and the girls in Dirndl.
    Traditional visitors wear during the Oktoberfest Bavarian hats (Tirolerhüte), which contain a tuft of goat hair. In Germany, goat hair is highly valued and prized, making it one of the most expensive objects for sale. The more tufts of goat hair on your hat, the wealthier you are considered to be. Technology helping, this tradition ended with the appearance of cheap goat hair imitations on the market.









 

    There are many problems every year with young people who overestimate their ability to handle large amounts of alcohol. Many forget that Oktoberfest beer has 5.8 to 6.3% alcohol and high sugar content (compared to an average of 5.2% of alcohol and low sugar content in German beer), and they pass out due to drunkenness. These drunk patrons are often called "Bierleichen" (German for "beer corpses").
For them as well as for the general medical treatment of visitors the Bavarian branch of German Red Cross operates an aid facility and provides emergency medical care on the festival grounds, staffed with around 100 volunteer medics and doctors per day. They serve together with special detachments of Munich police, fire department and other municipal authorities in the service center at the Behördenhof (authorities' court), a large building specially built for the Oktoberfest at the east side of the Theresienwiese, just behind the tents. There is also a place for lost & found children, a lost property office, a security point for women and other public services.
    To keep the Oktoberfest, and especially the beer tents, friendly for older people and families, the concept of the "quiet Oktoberfest" was developed in 2005. Until 6:00 pm, the tents only play quiet music, for example traditional wind music. Only after that will Schlager and pop music be played, which had led to more violence in earlier years. The music played in the afternoon is limited to 85 decibels. With these rules, the organizers of the Oktoberfest were able to curb the over-the-top party mentality and preserve the traditional beer tent atmosphere.



Another look inside one of the beer tents



      Since 2005 the last traveling Enterprise ride of Germany, called Mondlift, is back on the Oktoberfest.
    Starting in 2008, a new Bavarian law intended to ban smoking in all enclosed spaces that are open to the public, even at the Oktoberfest. Because of problems enforcing the anti-smoking law in the big tents there was an exception for the Oktoberfest 2008, although the sale of tobacco was not allowed. After heavy losses in the 2008 local elections with the smoke ban being a big issue in debates, the state's ruling party meanwhile implemented special exemptions to beer tents and small pubs. The change in regulation is aimed in particular at large tents at the Oktoberfest: So, smoking in the tents is still legal, but the tents usually have non-smoking areas. The sale of tobacco in the tents is now legal, but it's abandoned by agreement. However, in early 2010 a referendum held in Bavaria as a result of a popular initiative re-instituted the original, strict, smoking ban of 2008; thus, no beer will be sold to people caught smoking in the tents. The blanket smoking ban will not take effect until 2011, but all tents will institute the smoking ban this year as to do the "dry run" to identify any unforeseeable issues. The common issue when the smoking ban is in effect is the nauseating stench of stale beer spilled on the floor, which the smoking masked.
    2010 marks the 200th anniversary of Oktoberfest. For the anniversary, there was a horse race in historical costumes on opening day. A so-called "Historische Wiesn" (historical Oktoberfest) took place, starting one day earlier than usual on the southern part of the festival grounds. A specially brewed beer (solely available at the tents of the historical Oktoberfest), horse races, and a museum tent gave visitors an impression of how the event felt a century ago.








Size

    The Oktoberfest is known as the Largest Volksfest (People's Fair) in the World. In 1999 there were six and a half million visitors to the 42 hectare Theresienwiese. 72% of the people are from Bavaria. 15% of visitors come from foreign countries like the surrounding EU-countries and other non-European countries including the United States, Canada, Australia and the Far East.
    Besides the Oktoberfest, there are other public festivals that take place at the same location, in April/May: The Munich Frühlingsfest (Spring Festival) and Winter Tollwood-Festival in December with 650,000 visitors.
    After the Oktoberfest the next people fairs in size in Germany are the Cranger Kirmes in Herne (Wanne-Eickel) (the largest fair in Northrhine-Westphalia) with 4.7 million visitors, the Rheinkirmes in Düsseldorf (called Largest Fair on the Rhine) and the Freimarkt in Bremen (the oldest fair in Germany, held since 1035, and the biggest fair in Northern Germany) with about 4 million visitors per year each, followed by the Cannstatter Volksfest in Stuttgart with about 3 million visitors each year and the "Schützenfest Hannover", the world's largest marksmen's Fun Fair in Hanover with about 2 million visitors per year.









Oktoberfest Figures (2010)


  • Area: 0.42 km2 (103.78 acres)
  • Seats in the festival halls: approx. 100,000
  • Visitors: 6.4 million
  • Beer: appr. 7,100,000 litres (151,200 litres non-alcoholic)
  • Wine: 89,259 liters
  • Sparkling wine: 37,733 litres
  • Coffee and tea: 245,335 litres
  • Water and lemonade: 1,028,522 ½ litres
  • Chicken: 505,901 units
  • Pork sausages: 119,302 pairs
  • Fish: 40,850 kg
  • Pork knuckles (haxen): 69,293 units
  • Oxen: 119 units
  • Expenditure of electricity: 2.96 million kWh (as much as 14% of Munich's daily requirements or as much as a four person family will need in 52 years and 4 months)
  • Expenditure of gas: about 198,489 m3
  • Expenditure of water: about 107,489 m3 (as much as 27% of Munich's daily requirements )
  • Waste: 678 t (2004)
  • Toilets: about 980 seats, more than 878 meters of urinals and 17 for disabled persons
 
 
 
 
 
  • Phone booths: 83, also for international credit cards
  • Lost property: about 4000 items, among them 260 pairs of glasses, 200 mobile phones, wedding rings, and even crutches.

Garbage and toilets


    Nearly 1,000 tons of garbage result annually from the Oktoberfest. The mountains of garbage created are hauled away and the ways cleanly washed down each morning. The cleaning is paid for in part by the city of Munich and in part by the sponsors.
In 2004 the queues outside the toilets became so long that the police had to regulate the entrance. To keep traffic moving through the restrooms, men headed for the toilets were directed to the urinals (giant enclosed grate) if they only needed to urinate. Consequently, the number of toilets was increased by 20 % in 2005. Approximately 1,800 toilets and urinals are available at this time.
 
 
 
 
 
    Many Oktoberfest guests visit the quiet stalls in order to use their cell phones. For this reason there were plans in 2005 to install a Faraday cage around the toilets or to use Mobile phone jammers to prevent telephoning with a mobile telephone. Jamming devices are, however, illegal in Germany, and Faraday cages made of copper would have been too expensive, so these ambitious plans were dropped, and signs were placed instead, warning toilet users not to use cell phones in the stalls.
Tents
    There are currently fourteen large tents and twenty small tents at the Oktoberfest. The tents themselves are non-permanent structures which are constructed for and only used during the festival. The beer (or wine) served in each is in the accompanying table.
Large Tents
  • Hippodrom – One of the larger tents, it's the first tent that many visitors see at the fest. As well as serving normal Wiesn beer, it has a Sekt (sparkling wine) bar and Maß of Weißbier. Considered one of the trendiest tents, and attracts the occasional celebrity. Traditionally in the evening the Oktoberfest band the Münchner Zwietracht plays all the Oktoberfest classics.
  • Armbrustschützenzelt – Translates as the "Crossbow Shooters Tent", a competition that has been a part of the Oktoberfest since 1895.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Hofbräu-Festzelt – The counterpart to the famous Hofbräuhaus, this tent is especially popular with Americans, Australians and New Zealanders.
  • Hacker-Festzelt – One of the largest tents on the Wiesn, they have a rock band that plays from 5:30 each evening (as opposed to the traditional brass band). This tent is also known as "Himmel der Bayern" (Heaven of the Bavarians).
  • Schottenhamel – Reckoned to be the most important tent at the Oktoberfest, mainly because it is where it starts. On the first Saturday of the event, no beer is allowed to be served until the mayor of Munich (currently Christian Ude) taps the first keg, at 12 pm. Only then can the other tents begin to serve beer. Very popular amongst younger people. A substantial part of the tent is guaranteed to traditional Studentenverbindungen (a particular form of student fraternities) and outfitted with their distinctive colors and coats of arms.
  • Winzerer Fähndl – This tent is noted for its huge tower, with a Maß of Paulaner beer sitting atop it.
  • Schützen-Festhalle – This is a mid-sized tent. Situated under the Bavaria statue, the current te
  • nt was newly built in 2004.
  • Käfers Wiesen Schänke – The smallest of the large tents at the Oktoberfest, it is frequented by celebrities, and is known for its especially good food. In contrast to the other tents (which must close by 11 pm), it is open until 12:30 am, but it can be very difficult to get in.
  • Weinzelt – This tent offers a selection of more than 15 wines, as well as Weißbier.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Löwenbräu-Festhalle – Above the entrance is a 4.50 meter (15 foot) lion who occasionally drinks from his beer. This is overshadowed by another tower where another drinking lion sits.
  • Bräurosl (Hacker-Pschorr) – Named after the daughter of the original brewery owner (Pschorr), this tent has the usual brass band and a yodeler.
  • Augustiner-Festhalle – Considered by many locals to be the best tent, due to the fact it sells the favourite local brew, Augustiner, from individually tapped wooden kegs rather than stainless steel vats used by the other tents.
  • Ochsenbraterei – True to its name, this tent offers a great variety of ox dishes.
  • Fischer Vroni – Another of the smaller tents. Fisch is the German word for fish and this tent carries a huge selection in its menu.
Small Tents
  • Able's Kalbs-Kuchl – Resembling a large Bavarian hut, the “calf kitchen” is traditional and inviting yet still has a lively party atmosphere Oktoberfest fans crave.
  • Ammer Hühner &  Entenbraterei – In 1885, poultry dealer Joseph Ammer was allowed to construct his small booth at the Oktoberfest, creating the world’s first chicken roastery.
  • Bodo's Cafezelt – Don’t come to Bodo’s looking for beer. Instead you’ll find, exotic cocktails, Prosecco, champagne, coffee, donuts, ice cream, pastry, and strudel variations of all kinds.
  • Burtscher's Bratwursthütt´n – The smallest tent of the Oktoberfest, its unique atmosphere makes for a relaxing change from the larger tents.
  • Café Kaiserschmarrn – Beautifully created by Rischart, the Café holds a daily commemoration of the occasion of the first Oktoberfest – the wedding of Ludwig I and Therese of Saxony.
  • Café Mohrenkopf – Since 1950 Café Mohrenkopf has been baking cakes and pies fresh daily in the Oktoberfest tent.
  • Feisingers Ka's und Weinstubn – Cheese and everything that complements the cheese is the specialty of the house in this unique tent.
  • Glöckle Wirt – A visual treat, decorated with oil paintings, antique instruments and cooking utensils, the Glöckle Wirt offers its visitors an authentic Oktoberfest experience in a warm, welcoming atmosphere.





 
 
  • Heimer Hendl- und Entenbraterei – Very popular among the locals, Heimer’s is a family-friendly tent where authentic Oktoberfest tradition is timeless.
  • Heinz Wurst- Und Hühnerbraterei – Since 1906, the Heinz Sausage and Chicken Grill has been a fixture on the Wiesn, specializing in authentic Oktoberfest tradition.
  • Hochreiters Haxnbraterei – Quality is paramount in Hochreiter’s tent, where their BBQ experts prepare mouth-watering pork knuckles in the only haxenbraterei on the Wiesn.
  • Münchner Knödelei – The dumpling is an icon of Bavarian cuisine, and “preserving and spreading the dumpling culture” is the motto of this smaller tent.
  • Poschners Hühner- Und Entenbraterei – Poschner’s famous roasted chicken and duck has been a tradition on the Wiesn for four generations.
  • Schiebl's Kaffeehaferl – With seating for about 100, Schiebl’s comfy coffeehouse tent is a friendly meeting place for the whole family.
  • Wiesn Guglhupf Café-Dreh-Bar – A Guglhupf is a German cake, like an English bundt cake, and this slowly moving carousel bar is easy to spot because it’s shaped like one.
  • Wildmoser Hühnerbraterei – Owned by family Wildmoser since 1981, this small tent has been adopted and popularized by the Munich locals.
  • Wildstuben – The newest tent at Oktoberfest, you’ll appreciate the intricate details of the woodwork and the homey hunting lodge ambiance.
  • Wirtshaus im Schichtl – The mayor Christian Ude once wrote: "An Oktoberfest without Schichtl is inconceivable. The Schichtl is as essential as the beer, the radical and the chicken."
  • Zum Stiftl – Zum Stiftl is famous for its traditional duck and roasted chicken dishes, cozy atmosphere, and daily entertainment.
  • Zur Bratwurst – Debuting in 2007, the Hochreiter family have brought back the former Bratwurstglöckl in the spirit of good old Munich Oktoberfest.