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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S

Friday, July 22, 2016

DIY PEA AND MOSS BALL DECORATIONS!





   Creating a spring or summer décor is simple – just use something green – plants, flowers or create pieces like these for decoration – pea and moss balls. The supplies are: Mod Podge in matte, green acrylic paint, one package of six smooth foam balls, a bag of green moss, and a bag of dried split peas. First paint the balls with acrylic paint and let dry. Paint Mod Podge and press the pieces of moss or the peas to the ball. When gluing moss, do it half by half, when gluing peas, take smaller sections and wait for 5 minutes to let the peas grip. Now you can arrange these balls into some bowls or baskets and decorate any place with this light summer touch.



















BASTILLE DAY FROM FRANCE!!

 

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   Bastille Day is the name given in English-speaking countries to the French National Day, which is celebrated on the 14th of July each year. In France, it is formally called La Fête Nationale (The National Celebration) and commonly le quatorze juillet (the fourteenth of July). It commemorates the 1790 Fête de la Fédération, held on the first anniversary of the storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789; the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille fortress-prison was seen as a symbol of the uprising of the modern nation, and of the reconciliation of all the French inside the constitutional monarchy which preceded the First Republic, during the French Revolution. Festivities and official ceremonies are held all over France. The oldest and largest regular military parade in Europe is held on the morning of 14 July, on the Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris in front of the President of the Republic, French officials and foreign guests.


Events And Traditions Of The Day

   The parade opens with cadets from the École Polytechnique, Saint-Cyr, École Navale, and so forth, then other infantry troops, then motorized troops; aircraft of the Patrouille de France aerobatics team fly above. In recent times, it has become customary to invite units from France's allies to the parade; in 2004 during the centenary of the Entente Cordiale, British troops (the band of the Royal Marines, the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment, Grenadier Guards and King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery) led the Bastille Day parade in Paris for the first time, with the Red Arrows flying overhead.  In 2007 the German 26th Airborne Brigade led the march followed by British Royal Marines.




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   The president used to give an interview to members of the press, discussing the situation of the country, recent events and projects for the future. Nicolas Sarkozy, elected president in 2007, chose not to give it. The President also holds a garden party at the Palais de l'Elysée.
   Article 17 of the Constitution of France gives the President the authority to pardon criminals and, since 1991, the President has pardoned many petty offenders (mainly traffic offences) on 14 July. In 2007, former President Sarkozy declined to continue the practice.

 History

Storming The Batille

   On 19 May 1789, Louis XVI convened the Estates-General to hear their grievances. The deputies of the Third Estate representing the common people (the two others were the Catholic Church and nobility) decided to break away and form a National Assembly. On 20 June the deputies of the Third Estate took the Tennis Court Oath, swearing not to separate until a constitution had been established. They were gradually joined by delegates of the other estates; Louis XVI started to recognize their validity on 27 June. The assembly renamed itself the National Constituent Assembly on 9 July, and began to function as a legislature and to draft a constitution.
   In the wake of the 11 July dismissal of Jacques Necker, the people of Paris, fearful that they and their representatives would be attacked by the royal military, and seeking to gain ammunition and gunpowder for the general populace, stormed the Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris which had often held people jailed on the basis of lettres de cachet, arbitrary royal indictments that could not be appealed. Besides holding a large cache of ammunition and gunpowder, the Bastille had been known for holding political prisoners whose writings had displeased the royal government, and was thus a symbol of the absolutism of the monarchy. As it happened, at the time of the siege in July 1789 there were only seven inmates, none of great political significance.





 
 
 

   When the crowd—eventually reinforced by mutinous gardes françaises—proved a fair match for the fort's defenders, Governor de Launay, the commander of the Bastille, capitulated and opened the gates to avoid a mutual massacre. However, possibly because of a misunderstanding, fighting resumed. Ninety-eight attackers and just one defender died in the actual fighting, but in the aftermath, de Launay and seven other defenders were killed, as was the 'prévôt des marchands' (roughly, mayor) Jacques de Flesselles.
   Shortly after the storming of the Bastille, on 4 August feudalism was abolished and on 26 August, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen proclaimed.

The Fête de la Fédération

   The Fête de la Fédération on the 14 July 1790 was a huge feast and official event to celebrate the uprising of the short-lived constitutional monarchy in France and what people considered the happy conclusion of the French Revolution. The event took place on the Champ de Mars, which was at the time far outside Paris. The place had been transformed on a voluntary basis by the population of Paris itself, in what was recalled as the Journée des brouettes ("Wheelbarrow Day").








   A mass was celebrated by Talleyrand, bishop of Autun. The popular General Lafayette, as captain of the National Guard of Paris and confidant of the king, took his oath to the constitution, followed by the King Louis XVI. After the end of the official celebration, the day ended in a huge four-day popular feast and people celebrated with fireworks, as well as fine wine and running naked through the streets in order to display their great freedom.

Origin of the Present Celebration

   On 30 June 1878, a feast had been arranged in Paris by official decision to honour the French Republic (the event was commemorated in a painting by Claude Monet).  On 14 July 1879, another feast took place, with a semi-official aspect; the events of the day included a reception in the Chamber of Deputies, organised and presided over by Léon Gambetta,  a military review in Longchamp, and a Republican Feast in the Pré Catelan.  All through France, as Le Figaro wrote on the 16th, "people feasted much to honour the Bastille".
   On 21 May 1880, Benjamin Raspail proposed a law to have "the Republic choose the 14 July as a yearly national holiday". The Assembly voted in favour of the proposal on 21 May and 8 June.  The Senate approved on it 27 and 29 June, favouring 14 July against 4 August (honouring the end of the feudal system on 4 August 1789). The law was made official on 6 July 1880, and the Ministry of the Interior recommended to Prefects that the day should be "celebrated with all the brilliance that the local resources allow".  Indeed, the celebrations of the new holiday in 1880 were particularly magnificent.





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   In the debate leading up to the adoption of the holiday, Henri Martin, chairman of the French Senate, addressed that chamber on 29 June 1880. "Do not forget that behind this 14 July, where victory of the new era over the ancien régime was bought by fighting, do not forget that after the day of 14 July 1789, there was the day of 14 July 1790. ... This [latter] day cannot be blamed for having shed a drop of blood, for having divided the country. It was the consecration of the unity of France. ... If some of you might have scruples against the first 14 July, they certainly hold none against the second. Whatever difference which might part us, something hovers over them, it is the great images of national unity, which we all desire, for which we would all stand, willing to die if necessary."

Bastille Day Military Parade

   The Bastille Day Military Parade is the French military parade that has been held on the morning of 14 July each year in Paris since 1880. While previously held elsewhere within or near the capital city, since 1918 it has been held on the Champs-Elysées, with the evident agreement of the Allies as represented in the Versailles Peace Conference, and with the exception of the period of German occupation from 1940 to 1944.  The parade passes down the Champs-Elysées from the Arc de Triomphe to the Place de la Concorde, where the President of the French Republic, his government and foreign ambassadors to France stand. This is a popular event in France, broadcast on French TV, and is the oldest and largest regular military parade in Europe.   In some years, invited detachments of foreign troops take part in the parade and foreign statesmen attend as guests.
   Smaller military parades are held in French garrison towns, including Toulon and Belfort, with local troops.







Bastille Day celebrations in other countries
  • Belgium
  • Liège celebrates the Bastille Day each year since the end of the First World War, as Liège was decorated by the Légion d'Honneur for its unexpected resistance during the Battle of Liège.
  • Hungary
  • Budapest's two-day celebration is sponsored by the Institut de France.
  • South Africa
  • Franschhoek's week-end festivaL has been celebrated for the last 15 years. (Franschhoek, or 'French Corner,' is situated in the Western Cape.)
  • United Kingdom
  • London has a large French contingent, and celebrates Bastille Day at various locations including Battersea Park.






  • United States
Over 50 U.S. cities conduct annual celebrations
  • Baltimore has a large Bastille Day celebration each year at Petit Louis in the Roland Park area of Baltimore City.
  • Boston has a celebration annually, hosted by the French Cultural Center for over 35 years. Recently, the celebration took place in The Liberty Hotel, a former city jail converted into a boutique hotel, though more often the festivities occur in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood, near the Cultural Center's headquarters. The celebration typically includes francophone musical performers, dancing, and French cuisine.
  • Chicago has hosted a variety of Bastille Day celebrations in a number of locations in the city, including Navy Pier and Oz Park. The recent incarnations have been sponsored in part by the Chicago branch of the French-American Chamber of Commerce and by the French Consulate-General in Chicago.
  • Houston has a celebration at La Colombe d'Or Hotel. It is hosted by the Consulate General of France in Houston, The French Alliance, the French-American Chamber of Commerce, and the Texan-French Alliance for the Arts.
  • Milwaukee's four-day street festival begins with a "Storming of the Bastille" with a 43-foot replica of the Eiffel Tower.
  • Minneapolis has a celebration in Uptown with wine, French food, pastries, a flea market, circus performers and bands. Also in the Twin Cities area, the local chapter of the Alliance Française has hosted an annual event for years at varying locations with a competition for the "Best Baguette of the Twin Cities."
  • Montgomery, Ohio has a celebration with wine, beer, local restaurants' fare, pastries, games and bands.
  • New Orleans has multiple celebrations, the largest in the historic French Quarter.
  • New York City has numerous Bastille Day celebrations each July, including Bastille Day on 60th Street hosted by the French Institute Alliance Française between Fifth and Lexington Avenues on the Upper East Side of Manhattan,] Bastille Day on Smith Street in Brooklyn, and Bastille Day in Tribeca. The Empire State Building is illuminated in blue, white and red.
  • Orlando has a boutique Bastille Day street festival that began in 2009 in the Audubon Park Garden District and involves champagne, wine, music, petanque, artists, and street performers.
  • Philadelphia's Bastille Day, held at Eastern State Penitentiary, involves Marie Antoinette throwing locally manufactured pastries at the Parisian militia, as well as a re-enactment of the storming of the Bastille.
  • San Francisco has a large celebration in the downtown historic French quarter.
  • Seattle's Bastille Day Celebration, held at the Seattle Center, involves performances, picnics, wine and shopping.




 
 
 

One-time celebrations

  • 1979: A concert with Jean-Michel Jarre on the Place de la Concorde in Paris attracted one million people, securing an entry in the Guinness Book of Records for the largest crowd at an outdoor concert.
  • 1989: France celebrated the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution, notably with a monumental show on the Champs-Élysées in Paris, directed by French designer Jean-Paul Goude. President François Mitterrand acted as host for invited world leaders.
  • 1990: A concert with Jean-Michel Jarre was held at La Défense in Paris.
  • 1995: A concert with Jean-Michel Jarre was held at the Eiffel Tower in Paris.
  • 1998: Two days after the French football team became World Cup champions, huge celebrations took place nationwide.
  • 2004: To commemorate the centenary of the Entente Cordiale, the British led the military parade with the Red Arrows flying overhead.

HOW TO MAKE PAPER CLAY!!

How to make Paper Clay



 
 
 
I fell in love with sculpting with paper mache during my first project five years ago. However, I never really found a recipe that was worth the time and effort and mess that it took to get what I wanted. As a result, I used Celluclay for most projects. However, I recently stumbled upon an incredible blog called, Ultimate Paper Mache where Jonni (the artist and blogger) shares all sorts of tips, tutorials and recipes to help anyone on their way to successfully paper mache-ing. I am blown away by what Jonni can create, but I was especially grateful for the recipe she shared on how to make your own paper mache clay. Hot dog! It is easy as pie, quick, and works like charm!

For my purposes, I ended up altering the recipe just slightly so that I could get the thicker consistency that I like. Here's my version of the recipe but I strongly suggest popping over to Jonni's site where she posts all sorts of details that you might find handy):

Paper Clay:
2 Cups toilet paper
1 Cup regular joint compound (the premixed kind. Jonni recommends not using Dap brand since they changed their product and it doesn't work for the recipe anymore).
3/4 Cups paper mache paste or Elmers glue (much cheaper to use your own paste).
3/4 Cups flour
(The original recipe calls for Linseed Oil, but I didn't really find much difference, other than it was smelly and one more thing to keep out of reach of my boys.)

Start off by soaking your toilet paper in water:


 
 
 
 
 
When it is fully wet, remove cardboard center, squeeze out as much water as you can and break up into chunks.



 
 
 
 
Add all ingredients and mix on medium-high for 2-3 minutes and viola! You are ready to sculpt your heart out! Recipe yields 3 Cups of paper clay.



 

Thursday, July 14, 2016

CHRISTMAS IN JULY!!






   Christmas in July is an event which is unofficially celebrated as a holiday by people. It is especially popular among the young people. A Christmas in July dinner usually includes Christmas Decorations Christmas Candles, colorful streamers, bonbons, Christmas hats and whistles.
   During the summer months in the northern hemisphere, the weather becomes increasingly warm and many people crave for the atmosphere of cooler temperatures, gift giving, and holiday spirit. To satisfy this craving, some people throw parties during the month of July that mimic the holiday of Christmas.

History of Christmas In July









    It's hot, you're sweaty and longing for some relief from the heat. Aren't you? And while thinking about winter, you're probably also dreaming of all those snowy nights of Christmas celebrations? Well well, you can't actually change the season now, but the closest you can get to doing so is reduce the time left for Christmas and celebrate it now, in July. That's what many are doing year after year. An unofficial holiday, Christmas in July imitates the festivities of the actual Christmas and signifies our yearning for the coolness of winter amid the scorching summer months. Do you have any idea when Christmas in July celebrations started popping up? No?









    Come July, and there is an air of festivity all over. Everywhere we find people making a mad rush to nearby stores, shops and malls to buy gift items, apparels and all other articles traditionally linked to festal occasions. Those out of the loop may wonder at the reason for this sudden shopping though such people are a rarity. It is hard to come by anyone who has not heard about or celebrated the much talked about occasion - "Christmas In July".






Even Santa needs a little amusement with his buds



 
But how did this festival originate?

   The precise beginnings of the Christmas in July tradition is not very clear, although it is commonly believed that it actually started in Europe, as a way to celebrate Christmas in summer. During the summer months in the northern hemisphere, the weather becomes increasingly warm and many people crave the coolness of winter. Amid the scorching summer months, people miss the gift giving, and holiday spirit of the Christmastime. Though it is not known when it started exactly, it is probably from the 80s that the festival began to be celebrated. The earliest Christmas celebrations in July saw people throwing parties that imitate the actual Christmas festivities in December. The celebrations also included other Christmas traditions like Santa Claus, ice cream and other cold foods, and gifts. It was held that celebrating in the warm season would ensure a strong, happy winter Christmas season.









    This untimely Christmas festival is also often ascribed to a group of Irish tourists who went for a vacation in Sydney's Blue Mountains in the summer months of July in 1980. Away from the summer temperatures in their country, they were overjoyed at the sight of snow there. It is believed that they convinced the proprietor of a local hotel in the Blue Mountains in New South Wales to hold a party called "Yulefest". The idea was an instant hit and caught on the imagination of everyone present there. The proprietor saw a golden opportunity in this and henceforth held a Christmas Party each year in July.




Keeping it real with some of his "little" peeps



    The local businessmen too jumped in to cash in on this unique festival and it continues to this day. Today, the tradition is so well entrenched in Australia that most restaurants, clubs and dining halls, have an official advertised annual catered menu for Christmas in July, and are often booked in advance. Most hotels, restaurants, bars, apparel stores, gift shops offer special discounts for the occasion. During this time, you can find the local gift shops brimming with figurines of Santa and Snowmen. Resorts have special events connected with their Christmas in July celebrations. The whole occasion has come to be utilized as amarketing gimmick as much elsewhere in Australia as in its snowfields where the month of July coincides with the high season in the Australian skiing resorts.










    But the market opportunity is, undoubtedly, the most plausible reason behind "Christmas in July" celebrations. it is commonly said that the occasion was dreamed up by retail merchants in the western countries who wanted to benefit from a holiday in July, which is otherwise a dull season for business and has few marketing opportunities. That makes a lot of sense, specially when we see how so many “holidays” are emerging these days ranging from Boss’ Day to Grandparent’s Day. Many people embrace these special days as they emerge which surely spells a fortune for retail merchants as well as greeting card companies.








    These days, Christmas in July seems to be mainly a time for retail sales. In the United States, like all other festivals, this event too has become highly commercialized. is more often used as a marketing tool than as an actual holiday celebrated by ordinary people. But these days, many American families have started celebrating Christmas in July. An unofficial holiday, the event is especially popular among the young people. Restaurants offer special discounts on this time. Many nightclubs host on this time Christmas parties open to the public. Drinks are guzzled and food items eaten up like crazy. Television stations show the recent blockbuster flicks on this occasion or re-run Christmas specials, and many stores throw special "Christmas in July" sales. Many however, choose to spend the time all by themselves or with their families.




Santa and his "Old Lady", on Holiday




    Some families love the concept of Christmas in July, especially if their family members are scattered across the states, because it is easier for them to have a get-together in July, which is a summer month and when the weather is favourable for a vacation, rather than in the freezing winter months when long distance journeys are really hard.
    And then there are others who does not celebrate during this time. They are reluctant to acknowledge the event in July are opposed to having such an occasion. They argue that this untimely celebration of Christmas makes a mockery of the actual festival that is held on December 25th and commemorates Lord Jesus Christ's birth.
However, the precise date of Christ’s birth is subject to a lot of date. No one really knows when the messiah was really born. Hence, celebrating Christmas in July shouldn’t be a huge issue so long as the holiday doesn’t lose its meaning.
    Despite it's rampant commercialization, Christmas in July remains primarily an occasion to remember the nothern hemisphere's snow blanketed Christmas nights. It is a fun way to satisfy the craving for cooler weather and holiday cheer that many people experience during the hottest month of the year.




 
 

    Christmas in July is an event which is unofficially celebrated as a holiday by people. It is especially popular among the young people. The event is greatly exploited as a marketing opportunity in the middle of the year to uplift the slack in the market situation. It is celebrated sometime during the month of July. There are many people who does not celebrate during this time and are reluctant to acknowledge the event in July. Even among those who mark this time, it is far less important than The Christmas in December. A Christmas in July dinner usually includes Christmas Decorations Christmas candles, colorful streamers, bonbons, Christmas hats and whistles.
During the summer months in the northern hemisphere, the weather becomes increasingly warm and many people crave for the atmosphere of cooler temperatures, gift giving, and holiday spirit. To satisfy this craving, some people throw parties during the month of July that mimic the holiday of Christmas.



Watch out for Seagulls!



Celebration of Christmas in July (the whole month)...

    Did you know that most people have a love hate relationship with Christmas? Read on to know more... They love giving presents but hate the crowds; Love the true meaning but hate the commercialism that seems to engulf it; Love the music, but hate having six weeks of it. They love the food but hate the weight gain. Is it not funny that, despite all of that, we still hope Christmas comes more than once a year?! And the best part is we have a way to do exactly that - Celebrate it in July and leave the rest behind.. Its not about asking you to give up the late December festivities but adding an extra zing to your holidays and celebrations in the Summer heat. So soak up the sun and celebrate Christmas in July. Surprise your friends, family or mates you really care for with a one night of bonus Christmas celebration in the middle of Summer. Drag out the artificial tree while your love is away for the day or weekend and decorate it. Go to a nursery and find a small potted evergreen to light up, if you get a real one. Bake a couple of your favorite holiday goodies. Put a few presents under the tree. Turn the air conditioner on high and light a crackling fire in the fireplace while listening to your favorite Christmas tunes. And Folks! Its Christmas in July. Ho! Ho! Ho!




Singing a little "Take Me Out To The Ballgame".



    Often nightclubs host parties open to the public. Although its sometimes attributed to an Irish group who enjoyed the winter snow in Sydney's Blue Mountains and decided to party, the precise beginnings of the Christmas in July tradition is not totally clear as it is taken as a simple idea that has been enjoyed by many who remember the northern hemisphere's snow blanketed Christmas nights and wants to just have a jolly good time associated with gift-giving and loads of holiday cheer. Features of Christmas in July include: Santa Claus, ice cream and other cold foods, and gifts.





HAUNTED CASTLES OF EUROPE!!!

  Ancient or just simply old castles are some of the most interesting man-made places on Earth. They are often grand structures that are rich in history, but sometimes their history is dark and violent. This causes some people to look at these great historical sites in a different light. You can almost guarantee that if a person has been tortured, killed, or died of old age in a castle, that someone will claim it is haunted.
    European castles have been the home to ruling monarchs, both bad and good. They have seen the hardship, pain, tragedy and triumph of mankind. They have also served as prisons and torture chambers and in some instances, even tombs.
    Many believe this is why castles are so closely associated with ghosts and haunting's. With so much agony being born within, it makes sense that some of that might permeate into the very structure itself.



Tower of London



    Perhaps no castle known to man holds the possibility of ghostly apparitions than that of the Tower of London. It was there that many of Henry VIII's wives awaited their execution along with the likes of Sir Thomas More. Many of England's most famous figures-Princes Elizabeth, Sir Thomas Beckett, Sir Walter Raleigh and Guy Fawkes-were imprisoned there.
    Prisoners were tortured relentlessly, beaten, stretched and nearly drowned. Others were eventually beheaded, drawn and quartered, hung or impaled.
The figure of Anne Boleyn is but one of the many tower inhabitants that supposedly resurfaces to make her presence known from time to time. But she is not alone. Others that suffered the king's wrath such as the Countess of Salisbury also linger re-enacting with precise accuracy the events that led up to their deaths.
    These ghostly apparitions have even been caught on film. In 2003, a photographer commissioned to do a photo shoot there, reported many different incidents. While some refused to believe him, he proved his claims with oddly blank pictures; pictures of apparitions and one of an eerie ball of light.



Windsor Castle



    Windsor Castle has been home to many rulers and still is. Three of these rulers may still be heard and see in the castle. The infamously cruel ruler, King Henry VIII can supposedly be heard walking about and groaning. How people know it is he by his footsteps and groans is anyone's guess. King Charles I was beheaded before his death. Apparently some ghosts are given back their heads after their death because Charles has been seen with his in the library and in the canon's house at Windsor Castle.



Glamis Castle


    Glamis Castle is supposedly haunted by two ghosts. One of these ghosts is that of the Second Lord of Glamis or the "Wicked Lord". He is said to have been a heavy drinker, a gambler and a violent guy. Legend has it that one night he was without a gambling opponent and so he sought to gamble with none other than the Devil. He supposedly got his wish and was predictably relieved of his soul. Makes you wonder why the Devil let his soul wander around a castle.
    The other ghost that haunts Glamis Castle is that of the wife of the Sixth Lord of Glamis. She was found guilty of witchcraft and conspiracy to kill the king and was subsequently executed in 1537. She probably wasn't really a witch.



Trifels Castle




    Germany's Trifels Castle causes many visitors to wonder if its most famous resident, Richard the Lionheart, left a piece of himself there during his imprisonment following the crusades. While there is no proof the castle is actually haunted, many people have reported discomfort or tenseness while inside the structure.


Eltz Castle




    Eltz Castle in Germany supposedly houses the ghosts of medieval knights. Some say that Mad Ludwig still haunts his German castles.


Ballygally Castle




    In Ballygally Castle, it is said that Lady Isobel Shaw remains behind to torment the structure's annual visitors.



Kinnitty Castle



    Kinnitty Castle in County Kildare is believed to carry the spirits of dead Druids who refuse to leave the only home they knew.



Leap Castle




    Leap Castle was home of the O'Carroll Clan, it was the battle for power among the patriarch's two sons that eventually led to the castle's outrageous history. One day, while mass was being said in the castle chapel, one of the brothers rushed in and slew the other while he worshipped at the altar. After that, the Bloody Chapel was born and became home to more than 400 years of tragedy.
    In the 1800's renovation of the castle uncovered something of which no one was previously aware. Hidden behind the altar of worship was a hidden room with a trap door. When construction workers opened the door they discovered it fell several feet to a bed of spikes.
    It seems that the O'Carrolls used the room to rid themselves of their enemies or anyone else who angered them. Most people died upon impact. Those who did not; however, eventually died of blood loss or starvation. Three carts of bones were removed from the room.



Charleville Castle




   Charleville Castle is located in Northern Ireland and it has been verified that paranormal activity has taken place in the early morning hours. It has been said that the ghost of the former owner haunts the grounds every night. In addition, the ghost of a little girl who fell to her death from a high staircase. The girl is said to be about 6 years old and walks the corridors crying and asking for help.



Ardgillan Castle




    Ardgillan Castle is located 20 miles north of Dublin on the coast between Balbriggan and Skerries. The castle was built in 1737 and Robert Taylor was the original owner. A woman dressed in white is said to haunt the library and maids quarters. The woman doesn't speak but seems to wander about as if she is looking for something.




Killua Castle




   Killua Castle Clonmellon is located in Northern Ireland. The castle is said to be haunted by Jacky Dalton, a land steward from the 18th century who swindled his master out of money, silver and gold coins. Dalton was eventually put to death for his crime of theft in the 18th century. It is believed that Dalton's restless spirit haunts the property. In addition, voices have been heard and doors appear to open and close by themselves.



Clonony Castle




    Clonony Castle is located on Shannon Harbor and was built i the 16th century. A man has been seen in a hazy light standing at the top of the tower dressed in peasant type clothing. Locals are not sure as to why a spirit seems to be making its presence known. No story really exists concerning any tragic events taking place at this location.



Edinburgh Castle



    Edinburgh Castle also fails to escape its bloody history. An unusual amount of violent deaths took place there over the centuries, leading some to believe the castle could never be free of its ghostly visitors. Others believe it goes back to the fact that the castle was built on top of a once active volcano that claimed the lives of thousands of people. Still others say it has to do with the plague known as the Black Death, which claimed untold lives.
    Rather than remove the bodies, new structures were simply built on top of them; a new city covering the old but unable to erase its horrendous past. Uncovered in the early 90's, the subterranean city is believed to be home of hundreds of apparitions who simply cannot rest.