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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 08/01/13

Thursday, August 1, 2013

DIY VINTAGE HALLOWEEN PLACECARDS YOU CAN PRINT YOURSELF!!

Printable Halloween Place Cards

I had a ton of fun today putting together these new printable Halloween decorations – despite the fact I’m coming down with a miserable cold. Although they are technically made as place cards, you could also use them as napkin holders, too. I just love the funky vintage look of the art I used – these were definitely inspired by the old-fashioned Halloween decorations that are super-hard to find!



halloween party decorations Printable Halloween Place Cards
Printable Halloween Party Decorations

halloween placecards 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Retro Place Cards - Cat and Demon
halloween namecards 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Vintage Place Cards - Jack o' Lantern and Skeleton
vintage halloween decorations 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Halloween Monsters Place Cards - Dracula and Phantom of the Opera
printable halloween decorations 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Retro Place Cards - Pumpkin and Witch
retro halloween decorations 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Vintage Place Cards - Black Cat and Owl
printable halloween namecards 231x300 Printable Halloween Place Cards
Halloween Monsters Place Cards - Werewolf and Mummy

ORANGE PUSH UP SMOOTHIE!


   I thought I would throw a little bit of a curve ball your way and post a nice smoothie recipe (I love smoothies, of the non alcohol variety.  This recipe comes from www.loveveggiesandyoga.com.  Enjoy this nice refreshing drink  for breakfast or lunch.  Enjoy yourself!


When I was growing up, one of my favorite things to do was ride my bike with my friends to the local gas station’s mini-mart and reach into their freezer case and pull out an Orange Push-Up.






I loved Push-Ups and seeing those brightly colored dots meant that creamy orange goodness was soon going to be mine.






I love it when Push-Ups begin to melt because they taste even sweeter, creamier, and better.
The same was true with this smoothie. As it began to melt, it got even better.






This smoothie is a dead ringer for Orange Push-Ups.
Don’t skimp on the sugar if you want it to taste exactly like an Orange Push-Up and I promise, it does.






Sweet oranges ‘n creamy perfection.






I used this mango-orange from Hawaii’s Own brand for the concentrate. It was on sale for 99 cents for the can at my grocery store and I was

being cheapbeing budget conscious and didn’t want to buy the Minute Maid which was $3.29 for one can.
If you can’t find this concentrate, I’m sure any OJ concentrate or citrus juice concentrate blend should be fine. I really didn’t taste mango per se, just an orangey citrus flavor.






This recipe made three good-sized smoothies and since I wasn’t going to drink them all at once, I popped the leftover smoothie mixture in the freezer and realized after the fact that I should have poured the extra into Popsicle molds for homemade Push-Ups. Next time, I’ll do that.
For now, I’ve been eating it like orange sherbet style with a spoon from the glasses I poured it into and then froze.






And doing lots of slurping.
The variations of what I’m going to do with this addictive orange mixture is exciting and has my wheels turning:






1. Pour it into molds and freeze like traditional Push-Ups (or frozen into ice cube trays or poured into paper Dixie cups with a makeshift stick inserted and peel off the paper cup after it has frozen)
2. Freeze it and eat in a bowl as orange sherbert
3. Drink it smoothie style



Now if the weather could just warm up a bit so my teeth don’t chatter while I slurp copious amounts of orange sugary liquid.



But I’ll shiver and chatter for this stuff any day.






THE JACKALOPE FESTIVAL FROM DOUGLAS, WYOMING!




    Home to the infamous "Jackalope", Douglas Wyoming is a popular stop when traveling in the Wild West! The town of Douglas ... is small town America at its best!     In fact, we were rated "One of the Best small towns" in America!
    This area of east central Wyoming is the home of many historic trails rich in their history and rugged scenery. The mountain ranges and foothills offer refuge to elk, bear and deer with herds of antelope foraging on the the diverse landscape.
   The town of Douglas sits on the banks of the North Platte River, on the path from/to Denver, Colorado, Yellowstone National Park, or the Black Hills of South Dakota.
Other attractions of the area are: the Wyoming State Fairgrounds, the Wyoming Pioneer Memorial Museum, Douglas Railroad Interpretive Center, Oregon Trail and Historic Marker, Fort Fetterman, Ayres Natural Bridge, Sir Barton Memorial Statue - the First Triple Crown Winner in the United States, Laramie peak in the medicine Bow






   National Forest, Esterbrook Recreational Area and Friend Park Campground.
The town of Douglas celebrates the Jackalope the first weekend of June with many activities, such as, vendor entertainment, various events and mudbogging. Come join the fun!

The Origin of the Jackalope

    Douglas Herrick, creator of the "jackalope" — that curious critter with a jack rabbit's body and an antelope's antlers that could turn downright vicious when threatened yet sing a gentle tenor along with the best of the campfire cowboys —died Jan. 3, 2003 in Casper, WY. He was 82.






    In the 1930s, the Herrick brothers — Douglas and Ralph, who studied taxidermy by mail order as teenagers — went hunting. Returning home, they tossed a rabbit into the taxidermy shop.
    The carcass slid right up to a pair of deer antlers, and Douglas Herrick's eyes suddenly lighted up.
    "Let's mount it the way it is!" he said, and a legend was born — or at least given form.
Jackalope, thanks to the Herrick brothers, have taken their place in modern mythology right alongside Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster.






    As "proof" of the jackalopes’ presence now and in the past, they cite:
Fact or fiction, legend or lark, the jackalope the Herricks stuffed and mounted gave their native Douglas, WY., a reason to be.
    Before discovery of uranium, coal, oil and natural gas doubled the town's population to about 7,500 in the mid-1970s, Douglas specialized in selling jackalope souvenirs. The Herrick’s fed the increasing demand for the stuffed and mounted trophies. Tens of thousands have been sold.
    That first jackalope was sold for $10 to Roy Ball, who installed it proudly in the town's LaBonte Hotel. The mounted horned rabbit head was stolen in 1977.






    The town of Douglas erected an 8-foot-tall statue of the jackalope on one of Center streets islands, which met its demise when a four wheel drive pick up tried to run it over. The statue was re-constructed in Jackalope Square in the center of Douglas, where it stands to this day. Proud city fathers later added a 13-foot-tall jackalope cutout on a hillside and placed jackalope images on park benches and fire trucks, among other things. Now the largest jackalope in the world resides at the Douglas Railroad Interpretative Center.
    Acknowledging the animal's purported propensity to attack ferociously anything that threatened it, the city also posted warning signs: "Watch out for the jackalope."
The Douglas Chamber of Commerce has issued thousands of jackalope hunting licenses, despite rules specifying that the hunter can hunt only between midnight and 2 a.m. each June 31.






    Tourist-shop clerks in Douglas told and retold tales of cowboys who remembered harmonious jackalope joining their nightly campfire songs. Visitors rarely have left Douglas without buying jackalope postcards and trinkets.
    The state of Wyoming trademarked the jackalope name in 1965. Twenty years later, Gov. Ed Herschler, crediting Douglas Herrick with the animal's creation, designated Wyoming the jackalopes’ official home. The governor proclaimed Douglas to be the "Home of the Jackalope".
    Mr. Herrick made only about 1,000 or so horned rabbit trophies before going on to other things. His brother kept churning out jackalopes.






    Mr. Herrick grew up on a ranch near Douglas and served as a tail gunner on a B-17 during World War II. He worked as a taxidermist until 1954, when he became a welder and pipe fitter for Amoco Refinery until his retirement in 1980.

Myth of The Jackalope

    The myth of the jackalope has bred the rise of many outlandish (and largely tongue-in-cheek) claims as to the creature's habits. For example, it is said to be a hybrid of the pygmy-deer and a species of "killer rabbit". Reportedly, jackalopes are extremely shy unless approached. Legend also has it that female jackalopes can be milked as they sleep belly up and that the milk can be used for a variety of medicinal purposes. It has






also been said that the jackalope can convincingly imitate any sound, including the human voice. It uses this ability to elude pursuers, chiefly by using phrases such as "There he goes! That way!" It is said that a jackalope may be caught by putting a flask of whiskey out at night. The jackalope will drink its fill of whiskey and its intoxication will make it easier to hunt. In some parts of the United States it is said that jackalope meat has a taste similar to lobster. However, legend has it that they are dangerous if approached. It has also been said that jackalopes will only breed during electrical storms including hail, explaining its rarity.






    Jackalope legends are sometimes used by locals to play tricks on tourists. This joke was employed by Ronald Reagan to reporters in 1980 during a tour of his California ranch. Reagan had a rabbit head with antlers, which he referred to as a "jackalope", mounted on his wall. Reagan liked to claim that he had caught the animal himself. Reagan's jackalope hangs on the ranch's wall to this day.